I'm in the Game!! Now, what vehicles to use it in?? Race Car? Motor Home?

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Mi
After reading about the Greatness of Green for quite some time, I could no longer resist. On our first wedding anniversary this weekend, my wife and I took a trip to Chicago for the weekend. We live in Grand Haven, Michigan, which is about a 2.5 hour drive. At breakfast that morning, I explained to her the wonderful properties, and the many online stories of GC. I told her about the little elves who toiled so hard to make it so unique. I also explained to her that it is no longer made..... [Cool] My wife was hooked. She knew we had to have our own private stash of Pre Amber GC. As part of our drive to Chicago and back last weekend, we stopped at most every Autozone along the way. We found a few quarts here, and a few quarts there, for a final grand total of 61 quarts. My wife was more into it than I was, and we would race through the store to the oil racks, searching for that special Green Elixer. Now, I wonder, what vehicles should I use it in. Other than my new cars, which I know it will work well in, I have a few older Chrysler products with Big Blocks. I have a 63 Dodge with a 440 and solid cam in it that runs mid 11's at 120 mph in the quarter. It's mostly a show car, but sees a fair amount of street and strip duty. I have used Rotella T 15-40 in it since the motor was new (currently 730 miles since I built it). I also have a 68 Dodge Truck with 50,000 original miles, that has a factory 383, factory air, and was from out West. Rotella T in that too. It's not used very often, and mostly sits in storage. Should I auto RX this one and go synthetic or stay with the Rotella T? Lastly, I have a motorhome that I recently transplanted a fresh 440 that I built for it. I designed this engine for TORQUE. It dynoed at 364 horsepower @ 4200 RPM, but more important, produced 511 ft-lbs of torque at a low 2200 RPM. The motorhome was also broke in and has used only Rotella T 15-40 since new. Only the 63 Dodge has solid lifters and sees over 6000 RPM. The truck and the motorhome are hydraulic lifter vehicles, and don't see more than 4,000 RPM. I've been a fan of custom blending oils for my applications in the past. Would a little green and Rotella serve me well in these older Big Block Mopars? I have cases of Rotella T 10-30 and 15-40 in my garage, as well as some Royal Purple, a variety of M1, and the 61 quarts of GC. I know most on BITOG don't like self blending. Is GC suitable for these vehicles, or a blend of it. I could use the green only in our new vehicles, but would love to incorporate it into my classic Mopars as well. [Big Grin] [ May 19, 2005, 12:10 AM: Message edited by: 11secondoldmopar ]
 
Messages
181
Location
New York
quote:
Originally posted by 11secondoldmopar: After reading about the Greatness of Green for quite some time, I could no longer resist. On our first wedding anniversary this weekend, my wife and I took a trip to Chicago for the weekend. We live in Grand Haven, Michigan, which is about a 2.5 hour drive. At breakfast that morning, I explained to her the wonderful properties, and the many online stories of GC. I told her about the little elves who toiled so hard to make it so unique. I also explained to her that it is no longer made..... [Cool] My wife was hooked. She knew we had to have our own private stash of Pre Amber GC. As part of our drive to Chicago and back last weekend, we stopped at most every Autozone along the way. We found a few quarts here, and a few quarts there, for a final grand total of 61 quarts. My wife was more into it than I was, and we would race through the store to the oil racks, searching for that special Green Elixer. Now, I wonder, what vehicles should I use it in. Other than my new cars, which I know it will work well in, I have a few older Chrysler products with Big Blocks. I have a 63 Dodge with a 440 and solid cam in it that runs mid 11's at 120 mph in the quarter. It's mostly a show car, but sees a fair amount of street and strip duty. I have used Rotella T 15-40 in it since new. I also have a 68 Dodge Truck with 50,000 original miles, that has a factory 383, and air in it. Rotella T in that too. It's not used very often, and mostly sits in storage. Lastly, I have a motorhome that I recently transplanted a fresh 440 that I built for it. I designed this engine for TORQUE. It dynoed at 364 horsepower @ 4200 RPM, but more important, produced 511 ft-lbs of torque at a low 2200 RPM. The motorhome was also broke in and has used only Rotella T 15-40 since new. Only the 63 Dodge has a solid lifters and sees over 6000 RPM. The truck and the motorhome are hydraulic lifter vehicles, and don't see more than 4,000 RPM. I've been a fan of custom blending oils for my applications in the past. Would a little green and Rotella serve me well in these older Big Block Mopars? I have cases of Rotella T 10-30 and 15-40 in my garage, as well as some Royal Purple, a variety of M1, and the 61 quarts of GC. I know most on BITOG don't like self blending. Is GC suitable for these vehicles, or a blend of it. I could use the green only in our new vehicles, but would love to incorporate it into my classic Mopars as well. [Big Grin]
Wow! 61 Qts.! That's a score. I found 15 and I thought I hit the jackpot. I talk to my girlfriend about stuff like oil and she is not very enthusiastic, to say the least [Frown] Wait for the relies from the pro's, pscholte in particular.
 
Messages
181
Location
New York
quote:
Originally posted by V8Blitz:
quote:
Originally posted by 11secondoldmopar: After reading about the Greatness of Green for quite some time, I could no longer resist. On our first wedding anniversary this weekend, my wife and I took a trip to Chicago for the weekend. We live in Grand Haven, Michigan, which is about a 2.5 hour drive. At breakfast that morning, I explained to her the wonderful properties, and the many online stories of GC. I told her about the little elves who toiled so hard to make it so unique. I also explained to her that it is no longer made..... [Cool] My wife was hooked. She knew we had to have our own private stash of Pre Amber GC. As part of our drive to Chicago and back last weekend, we stopped at most every Autozone along the way. We found a few quarts here, and a few quarts there, for a final grand total of 61 quarts. My wife was more into it than I was, and we would race through the store to the oil racks, searching for that special Green Elixer. Now, I wonder, what vehicles should I use it in. Other than my new cars, which I know it will work well in, I have a few older Chrysler products with Big Blocks. I have a 63 Dodge with a 440 and solid cam in it that runs mid 11's at 120 mph in the quarter. It's mostly a show car, but sees a fair amount of street and strip duty. I have used Rotella T 15-40 in it since new. I also have a 68 Dodge Truck with 50,000 original miles, that has a factory 383, and air in it. Rotella T in that too. It's not used very often, and mostly sits in storage. Lastly, I have a motorhome that I recently transplanted a fresh 440 that I built for it. I designed this engine for TORQUE. It dynoed at 364 horsepower @ 4200 RPM, but more important, produced 511 ft-lbs of torque at a low 2200 RPM. The motorhome was also broke in and has used only Rotella T 15-40 since new. Only the 63 Dodge has a solid lifters and sees over 6000 RPM. The truck and the motorhome are hydraulic lifter vehicles, and don't see more than 4,000 RPM. I've been a fan of custom blending oils for my applications in the past. Would a little green and Rotella serve me well in these older Big Block Mopars? I have cases of Rotella T 10-30 and 15-40 in my garage, as well as some Royal Purple, a variety of M1, and the 61 quarts of GC. I know most on BITOG don't like self blending. Is GC suitable for these vehicles, or a blend of it. I could use the green only in our new vehicles, but would love to incorporate it into my classic Mopars as well. [Big Grin]
Wow! 61 Qts.! That's a score. I found 15 and I thought I hit the jackpot. I talk to my girlfriend about stuff like oil and she is not very enthusiastic, to say the least [Frown] Wait for the replies from the pro's, pscholte in particular.

 
quote:
Originally posted by 11secondoldmopar: I designed this engine for TORQUE. It dynoed at 364 horsepower @ 4200 RPM, but more important, produced 511 ft-lbs of torque at a low 2200 RPM.
[Eek!] [Eek!] Is that thing a diesel or what? [Big Grin] Or rather, a gas engine with a heart of a diesel [Wink] . I wouldn't hesitate to use the Green in any of your vehicles. However, since the Green is of limited availability, I wouldn't put it in anything that won't make good use out of it. Meaning, don't "waste" it for a car that get limited use...would be a shame to change it every year and only get a few thousand miles out of it. Just my $.02 [Cheers!]
 

11secondoldmopar

Thread starter
Messages
33
Location
Mi
quote:
Originally posted by bighead: [QUOTE]Originally posted by 11secondoldmopar: [qb] I designed this engine for TORQUE. It dynoed at 364 horsepower @ 4200 RPM, but more important, produced 511 ft-lbs of torque at a low 2200 RPM.
[Eek!] [Eek!] Is that thing a diesel or what? [Big Grin] Or rather, a gas engine with a heart of a diesel [Wink] . It took little extra amount of thought to design/assemble this combo. It has a split duration custom comp cam, and had the cylinder heads ported and gone through by an NHRA and IHRA multiple class world record holder. MSD, Edelbrock, port matching, all the stuff you do with a performance engine assembly. The exhaust on it is a thing of beauty. Headers dump into a hand fabricated 2 into 1 merge collector, and exhaust is handled through a single, rediculously large 3 ft long Dynomax Super Turbo Muffler.(designed for big diesels) By not using a simple dual exhaust setup,(better for horsepower) we again focused on torque, the exhaust on the motorhome is quiet, but very freeflowing. And kept it's torque and grunt. It's fun to see the expressions on the faces of people you pass going up a grade in this beheamoth. [Eek!] [Eek!] They usually just stare, jaws hanging open, as they downshift trying to keep up. [Duh!]
 
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