Hyundai/Kia ATF Volume Tolerance?

DxC

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May 25, 2018
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3
Location
San Diego, CA
Hi all,

I'm maintaining my GF's 2012 Kia Forte LX 2.0L with (I think) 6 speed AT.

It was overdue for an ATF change, so I opted for a drain and fill. Local mechanic quoted $250 for the job and dealer wanted even more. Times are tough, so I opted to do it myself.

So, some background:
I had the time to do the job today and went for it. But I was not as responsible as I should have been and have some potential mistakes:
  • I opted not to follow the process described in the video, instead going for drain-measure-fill.
    • I did this using 2 measuring cups, made for cooking (they were brand new) -- one for old oil, one for new. After draining the old oil, I poured as much of it as I could into one cup, then matched the amount of old oil with new oil in cup #2. Poured new oil into fill hole, old oil into container, repeat process until drain pain is empty.
    • In case you didn't watch the video, I went this route because the fill-via-level-check-hole process was nuanced. Has to be the correct temp, completely level, and doesn't just not leak if it's full -- a "small stream" pours out when it's at the correct fill level, and you're meant to refill the amount bled. Weirdly subjective measures, and I don't have a lift. I figured that the fact that "small stream" is so loosely defined means that there's at least some wiggle room designed into the AT.
  • Part ways through, I realized I didn't have the right socket (24mm) and decided to proceed loosening the drain bolt with an adjustable wrench, which means I didn't torque it to spec on replacement.
    • I retightened by hand, and checked for leaks after warming up the engine for 30mins at high speeds. There were none.
  • I screwed up the first "fill" by going a bit too fast, underestimating just how slowly you have to drizzle the new oil in without a breather (the level check hole).
    • I realized this quickly, and ended up with only a really small puddle on my garage floor. A few drops at most.
    • I "compensated" by adding like maybe 50-100mL or so during the fill according to the measuring cup.
  • After finishing as accurately as I thought I could, I went for a 30ish minute drive, scaling up the speed as I went to see if anything would explode. Got nervous about the few drops of difference between old and new oil and ended up draining via the level check afterward.
    • More came out that expected. I repeated the drain-measure-fill process and replaced what came out after realizing that the excess heat (supposed to be 10-15min at lower speeds) affected the viscosity and probably nullified the check.
Now, accounting for the extra ATF I poured in (the 50-100mL) and the amount of ATF that sticks to the pan, funnels, and measuring cups, I'm assuming that the amount of fluid replaced isn't EXACTLY the same. Which leads to my question:

Should I be worried about that discrepancy? How much tolerance for fluid level do these sealed transmissions usually have? Should I let the tranny cool and try to do the PITA level check properly tomorrow?

And also: I'm thinking about going out and get the ****ed 24mm socket to torque the bolt. Would you all say it's worth it, given there are no leaks?

Thanks, folks.
 
Joined
Aug 21, 2012
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On my Hyundai / Kia vehicles, I just fill what I drain. On my sons Kia Rio it is three quarts on the button. Haven’t done it yet on the Tucson. Has 35K. Doing it for first time next oil change. I do the job cold. Use the same Valvoline Maxlife ATF. Never had any issues.
 
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Same thing happened to me. Youre over thinking on the level check. Get a cheap obd2 reader (bafx on amazon) and car scanner elm app and do a level check at spec temp after adding half a quart. Check while idling and vehicle level. If you get a slow light stream, the level is fine. If it's
 
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Yeah, you’re probably overthinking it. It sounds like you did a pretty good job of putting back what came out. Interestingly, I’ve read and heard that most Hyun/Kias are actually a bit under-filled from the factory.
 
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IIRC, 122f is the magic temp. Buy an IR thermometer from HF and err on the cooler side if in doubt. That should get you pretty close.
 
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ottawa
Hi all,

I'm maintaining my GF's 2012 Kia Forte LX 2.0L with (I think) 6 speed AT.

It was overdue for an ATF change, so I opted for a drain and fill. Local mechanic quoted $250 for the job and dealer wanted even more. Times are tough, so I opted to do it myself.

So, some background:
I had the time to do the job today and went for it. But I was not as responsible as I should have been and have some potential mistakes:
  • I opted not to follow the process described in the video, instead going for drain-measure-fill.
    • I did this using 2 measuring cups, made for cooking (they were brand new) -- one for old oil, one for new. After draining the old oil, I poured as much of it as I could into one cup, then matched the amount of old oil with new oil in cup #2. Poured new oil into fill hole, old oil into container, repeat process until drain pain is empty.
    • In case you didn't watch the video, I went this route because the fill-via-level-check-hole process was nuanced. Has to be the correct temp, completely level, and doesn't just not leak if it's full -- a "small stream" pours out when it's at the correct fill level, and you're meant to refill the amount bled. Weirdly subjective measures, and I don't have a lift. I figured that the fact that "small stream" is so loosely defined means that there's at least some wiggle room designed into the AT.
  • Part ways through, I realized I didn't have the right socket (24mm) and decided to proceed loosening the drain bolt with an adjustable wrench, which means I didn't torque it to spec on replacement.
    • I retightened by hand, and checked for leaks after warming up the engine for 30mins at high speeds. There were none.
  • I screwed up the first "fill" by going a bit too fast, underestimating just how slowly you have to drizzle the new oil in without a breather (the level check hole).
    • I realized this quickly, and ended up with only a really small puddle on my garage floor. A few drops at most.
    • I "compensated" by adding like maybe 50-100mL or so during the fill according to the measuring cup.
  • After finishing as accurately as I thought I could, I went for a 30ish minute drive, scaling up the speed as I went to see if anything would explode. Got nervous about the few drops of difference between old and new oil and ended up draining via the level check afterward.
    • More came out that expected. I repeated the drain-measure-fill process and replaced what came out after realizing that the excess heat (supposed to be 10-15min at lower speeds) affected the viscosity and probably nullified the check.
Now, accounting for the extra ATF I poured in (the 50-100mL) and the amount of ATF that sticks to the pan, funnels, and measuring cups, I'm assuming that the amount of fluid replaced isn't EXACTLY the same. Which leads to my question:

Should I be worried about that discrepancy? How much tolerance for fluid level do these sealed transmissions usually have? Should I let the tranny cool and try to do the PITA level check properly tomorrow?

And also: I'm thinking about going out and get the ****ed 24mm socket to torque the bolt. Would you all say it's worth it, given there are no leaks?

Thanks, folks.
No worry.......
Hakuna matata
 
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I've wondered why the temperature when changing out fluid is so critical. If the fluid expands when at operating temp and is measured and the replacement fluid is at ambient temp shouldn't they be unequal volumes? My method (for cvt fluid) is to drain out a measured amount with a fluid extractor (say three quarts) at ambient temperature and replace that with an equal amount at ambient temperature. Same amount of fluid exchange at same temp. Same volume. Drive a day or two and repeat procedure.

valvoline.jpg
 
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IIRC Hyundai and Kia ATF change procedure and level checks call for 500-700ml overfill first, run engine (to and at operating temp) and open level port, let it drain till slow almost dripping stream?
In both my Kias (6AT) I saw 200ml difference in volume where ATF level drops when engine is running. So technically one can check level when engine is off, close port, then just add another 200ml and be done.
 

blupupher

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IIRC Hyundai and Kia ATF change procedure and level checks call for 500-700ml overfill first, run engine (to and at operating temp) and open level port, let it drain till slow almost dripping stream?
In both my Kias (6AT) I saw 200ml difference in volume where ATF level drops when engine is running. So technically one can check level when engine is off, close port, then just add another 200ml and be done.
Yup.
I want to say my Santa Fe basically says drain, add 5 qts atf, get it up to temp, shut off, then remove side port and let drain till "slow" stream.
Plan on doing it at next change (40,000 miles)
I did a drain and fill on my mom's Soul, I think it was 4 quarts, but same procedure.
Really not that hard, I think easier than my F150 or Scion xB where I am always guessing how much drained out and how much I need to add.
 
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Yup.
I want to say my Santa Fe basically says drain, add 5 qts atf, get it up to temp, shut off, then remove side port and let drain till "slow" stream.
Plan on doing it at next change (40,000 miles)
I did a drain and fill on my mom's Soul, I think it was 4 quarts, but same procedure.
Really not that hard, I think easier than my F150 or Scion xB where I am always guessing how much drained out and how much I need to add.
That's how I did it once I had access to a lift at the shop I work at, simple and no guessing, but the drain, measure, and refill with similar amount method worked perfectly fine for me prior to that, a little over or a little under doesn't make a difference in these transmissions.

Also have to add, do not do it shut off, the engine should be running in park after cycling from park to drive and back twice. If you measure it with the engine shut off you will underfill it.
 
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