HUH?

MolaKule

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I came across a Title of a Chemical Paper: Ionic liquids in embalming and tissue preservation. Can traditional formalin-fixation be replaced safely? HUH? Can any undertakers please explain?
 
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MolaKule

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Originally Posted By: Rosetta
Nuclear emitting ions products to mummy making, in spite of traditional liquid formal embalming.
You may be on to something. I mean, safety for whom, the dead person or the embalmer?
 
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Originally Posted By: MolaKule
Originally Posted By: Rosetta
Nuclear emitting ions products to mummy making, in spite of traditional liquid formal embalming.
You may be on to something. I mean, safety for whom, the dead person or the embalmer?
Probably for the embalmer. Formalin is extremely toxic, and finding a replacement that is less so, is probably not a bad idea.
 
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You must be talking about 1-methyl-3-octyloxymethylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate. It's use in path labs to eliminate hazardous vapors that are emitted by formalin. It's salt content matches that of human tissues and is not vaporous. Using this stuff means that med students can go to the school cafeteria just like everyone else.
 
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Originally Posted By: Nick R
Probably for the embalmer. Formalin is extremely toxic, and finding a replacement that is less so, is probably not a bad idea.
How about first year biology students who are exposed to large amounts of the stuff, too? wink
 

MolaKule

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Quote:
Probably for the embalmer. Formalin is extremely toxic, and finding a replacement that is less so, is probably not a bad idea.
I know the formalin compound is formaldehyde gas in water and stabilized by methyl alcohol and used as a biological "fixant." It just struck me as odd the way the title was stated. grin2
 
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Well, duh, think about what you are trying to accomplish. It's like people complaining that the metals used to treat wood to prevent decay are toxic. That's the point.
Originally Posted By: Nick R
Formalin is extremely toxic, and finding a replacement that is less so, is probably not a bad idea.
 
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