how do you change the oil in a 18 wheeler???

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What equipment do i need to change the oil in a big rig?. Is it just like changeing the oil in a car.....but bigger. Whats the differance? We are about to open a on site oil change place and would like to add big rigs to our list. But, we have never done it. This is part of my research on this topic, so I would be gratefull for any advice.
 
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My son has his own truck, he lets the truck stops change it, its not worth it and there is more to it then draining the oil, so spend the 275 dollars and let them do it. I suppose u could go to a truckstop and they may let u watch, imho
 
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10-12 gallons of oil and other accessories needing to be changed, such as fuel/water seperator filter, air filters, fuel pump filters, oil filters. This is often standard procedure for a Schedule B oil change is a Full Service oil change. Done 12,000 to 20,000 miles.
 
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yep about the same. Just expect between 5 to 12 gallons of oil depending on engine. some may have more than 1 full flow filter and possibly a bypass filter. tho most will probably have 1 large full flow. clearance wise I would have at least 13.5 or a 14ft roof.
 
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There's 3 rigs on our farm, I do the service on all of them myself. Just like a big car, except the international has two (different sized) oil filters instead of just one like the Pete and Ford. I use the bottom third of a 55 gallon drum as a oil drain pain. The best advice I can give is to have storage for the used oil. I have a 250 gallon chemical tote I pour it into, and a oil recycler comes by from time to time and takes it. With 3 semis, 9 tractors, a combine, and a skid steer it fills up fast.
 
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Originally Posted By: antonmnster
I don't think I'd trust my investment with someone who's looking for technical training here.
It's just an oil change. duh how hard can it be?
 
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I used to change the oil in my truck. It held 12 gallons of oil. I used a 5 gallon bucket and had to make 3 trips to the barrel to get it all out. The filter is pretty heavy when full of oil so I poked a hole in it first.
 
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My wife's Grandfather wass an owner-operator. Being a BITOGER, I asked him about the truck OC's once, and he said he took it to a shop to have it done always, said it wasn't worth the hassle to do it himself.
 
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Originally Posted By: antonmnster
I don't think I'd trust my investment with someone who's looking for technical training here.
Well, this may not be a place to receive technical training, but it's a good place for opinions and views on the issue - a great starting point. There are people on this board who do or have owned, managed, and maintained fleets, after all.
 
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Originally Posted By: antonmnster
I don't think I'd trust my investment with someone who's looking for technical training here.
x2 - I would be quite embarrassed if I was in that business and had to ask that question. Truckers are pros and don't want amateurs working on their rigs.
 

dnewton3

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Originally Posted By: Artem
Originally Posted By: antonmnster
I don't think I'd trust my investment with someone who's looking for technical training here.
It's just an oil change. duh how hard can it be?
Following that logic, there's no known risk of an OCI a a quicke-lube, either .... Like they've never not changed oil even though they said they did, drained oil but not refilled, filled with wrong oil, filled to wrong level, installed the wrong filter, not changed filters, etc. An "on site" oil change is a nice convience for some folks, but I do agree that big rigs present unique tasks. If one has to ask, perhaps they many not up to the challange. In theory, it's just as easy; drain and fill, and replace filters. Any fleet operation is likely not going to utilize this service; they will have their own maintenance crew. This service might be used by owner/operators, but I'm not sure they would get a warm, fuzzy feeling when the supposed "expert" rolls up and asks if he can see the Peterbuilt owner's manual to find where the filter is and how many quarts (gallons) it takes ...
 
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Years ago, I worked for a mobile fleet service company. I drove a one-ton Ford truck with an enclosed body. It had two 100 gal. tanks inside with air-powered pumps and hose reels to meter out the oil. First, that's a tough way to make a living. We serviced small fleets, usually five to twenty vehicles. We had to work around their schedules. One customer was a laundry service. We had to change oil while they were unloading and loading the trucks when they came back in the afternoon. The biggest hassle was filling semis in the winter. Pumping 12 gallons of 30 wt HDMO could take 30 - 45 minutes in very cold weather. Using 2 six gallon drain pans, we had to switch halfway through the drain. Always a mess to clean up. (I like the idea of the end of a 55 gal drum on wheels.) I wouldn't do it again, but if it's what you want, go for it. It won't be easy, but there's money to be made. (Get big enough to hire somebody else to do the dirty work!!!)
 
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Quote:
on site oil change place
On site means what?...their site? So it's not a place...or is it? Anyway, find somebody with a big truck who will let you do an oil change for just the cost of the products. Find out how much bother and hard work it is. Find out what filters you'll be expected to change--oil, maybe fuel, maybe air, maybe coolant--and if you want to have those on hand. The only difference is in scale. Bigger trucks, bigger tools, bigger waste oil tanks, bigger fresh oil tanks, more space to store bigger filters, bigger opportunity for an expensive mess and clean up. I've changed the oil in sumps that ranged from six ounces to six hundred gallons. Just a difference of scale. Is there a market for your services? That needs to be your number one investigation.
 
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I'm going to tell you one thing, and one thing only; you have a LOT to learn before you can start messing around with big rigs. I would recommend.......no......it is mandatory that you receive some serious training, do some serious research, and get some serious hands on experience before undertaking this task. I hope this business is still early on in the planning stages. If you are going to pull the trigger on this idea anytime soon, the round will likely end up in your foot.
 
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Originally Posted By: user52165
Originally Posted By: antonmnster
I don't think I'd trust my investment with someone who's looking for technical training here.
x2 - I would be quite embarrassed if I was in that business and had to ask that question. Truckers are pros and don't want amateurs working on their rigs.
With a mentally like this no one would ever learn. The best advice I can give you if this something you want to explore get a maintenance job at a local truck stop. Many are willing to train also.
 
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