How do I hook up a generator to the house panel?

JLawrence08648

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Jan 20, 2017
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NJ
I like an Interlock and come spring, I will be going with that, price, easy to install, simple, seldom will be used as we have a very good electric supplier.
 
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Dec 31, 2017
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Isn't turning off your Main Breaker an isolation? And then connect below. (works for me)
It’s against the code, mostly because you can electrocute a line worker if some moron forgets to throw the breaker. Having said that, if you are caught in an emergency I guess you do what you have to do. However, people who carry on with this long term are in the wrong.
 
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Oct 4, 2010
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Midwest
I look at my Generator as a short term living arrangement.

I have an interlock installed to a 30A double breaker in my panel with 10g wire running to a 30amp inlet box outside of the house. I have a Generac 6500running 8250surge home line generator. I can power my freezers and fridge, water heater (gas power vent), oven (gas), lights (led), HE furnace, and my sump pump with no issues. Just have to be cognizant of what you’re running at one time. If I know my sump pump will be cycling, I’ll power less things. Make sure if you buy a portable generator that’s going to power anything with sensitive electronics, that it’s an inverter ($$) or a low THD generator.

I spent around $800 for the generator and installation parts. I can’t justify the thousands of dollars for a once a week event once every few years.
 
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Jun 9, 2005
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Vermont
Something I’ve been contemplating along these lines...oil-fired furnace providing forced hot water heat. The power wire for the furnace disappears into a hole in the wall.

Could I just shut off the circuit, cut the wire, install a regular female plug receptacle in the wall, install a male plug on the end of the furnace wire, and be able to plug the furnace into a generator after that?
 
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Ohio
It’s against the code, mostly because you can electrocute a line worker if some moron forgets to throw the breaker. Having said that, if you are caught in an emergency I guess you do what you have to do. However, people who carry on with this long term are in the wrong.
True, not up to code. The one thing the naysayers concerned about electrocuting line workers seem to overlook is that everyone else doesn't magically disconnect from the grid during a power failure. If you actually forgot to disconnect your main, you would be trying to power your house and EVERYONE ELSE who has lost power. Your generator would be severely overloaded, and would be tripping breakers or it would just stall outright long before any linemen would be at risk. It can be done if you know the risks and take the precautions. Kept my heat, refrigerator, and lights going a couple years ago when a tree took out the power lines to our street, and power wasn't restored for a couple days.
 

wdn

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Aug 6, 2018
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I view owning a standby generator as part of a contract with society that includes me not killing a man to save a dollar. That means a transfer switch with individual switched breakers sized to each circuit the generator will power, UL listed, installed by a licensed electrician, and that meets every bit of the electrical code.
 
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