How dangerous are wheel spacers (1/4”) for oem rims?

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I thought you were worried about thread engagement?

And what do you do with the excess stud. Still need wheels with pockets in the hub, and not many OEM wheels have that.
Can you post a picture as an example of what you mean ?
 
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Yes I understand what you mean now. If the stock studs protrude from the spacers then the easiest solution is a thinker spacer
 

1 SX

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Update on this, i decided against using spacers for multiple reasons.. I could not even find a shop to touch it and install spacers while swapping over the new tires to the mazda rims, that was my first red flag. Im going to keep the current rims, bite the bullet and have them fixed. While at one of these shops they recommended a rim repair shop that is local-ish to me for about $100/rim. Thanks for all the feedback.
 
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Update on this, i decided against using spacers for multiple reasons.. I could not even find a shop to touch it and install spacers while swapping over the new tires to the mazda rims, that was my first red flag. Im going to keep the current rims, bite the bullet and have them fixed. While at one of these shops they recommended a rim repair shop that is local-ish to me for about $100/rim. Thanks for all the feedback.
Need to find a performance shop. Or a euro shop. Spacers and weird fitments are the name of the game.
 
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Because you don't run the risk of the wheel coming off because you did not have enough threads on the bolt to secure the wheel on. Spacers are installed on the bolts of the hub and then the wheel is installed on the bolts of the spacers.

You have 2 set of bolts. It is not as installing a shim between the hub and the wheel
Any reputable company has specific bolts that make up for size of the spacer.
 

1 SX

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Decided to not go with the spacers and Mazda rim set up. I had the oem Hyundai rims repaired for $350 and they are perfect now and no vibration even at above highway speeds… I’m not a fan of slip on spacers and feel like it was a safety issue, but under certain conditions I “could” see them working okay ish.
thanks for the feedback
 
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on my 2001 TT225Q i used quality adaptec apacers that come with the proper longer bolts for MY aftermarket wheels. they are on for several years + thousands of miles without issue. i put them on for looks, to push the wheels out farther + close the gap. you pick your size + they are made in usa with 6061T billet alum with a lifetime warranty. there are different types of spacers + adapters for various uses. wheel repair is generally NOT good as i learned unless its a small imperfection + most factory wheels are cheap + heavy weak castings!!
 
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This Hyundai has options from 15” steel wheels to 17” alloys with off set around 40? Does that sound correct?

it appears the Hyundai has a offset of 46mm while the Mazda is 50mm?
you have to be careful as offset is from centerline and those are different width wheels.
 
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This whole thread is a disaster waiting to happen. If you thought you had vibration problems before, you probably will now too. I would start over and buy the correct wheels for your car. It will be much cheaper overall.
 
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There are 10mm bolt on spacers too
I remember there was one building's "bridge" collapsed because the design changed from one long bolt going from 1/F through 2/F to top, to 1/F to 2/F, then 2/F to top. The amount of extra weight causes the bolt to break off in a party.

The adapter with a bolt now has the adapter holding the wheel instead of just as a "spacer" dealing only with compression forces. It has to deal with rotational force, pulling out of the wheel, between the bolts in both directions.

Having longer bolt going through the spacer is IMO safer because of this.
 
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Spacers tend to be made out of aluminum. I would not trust a spacer that has some studs on it, because the aluminum is on the weak side of things... and that is what is holding the wheel to the car, so, I would be worried about the studs shearing off of the aluminum spacer.

Plus, a little late, but for the op's sake, I can't see them working on a car with lug studs, especially if they are press-on studs.

I ran spacers before on a car with lug bolts. Putting on the first lug bolt is a PITA unless you have at least 2 lug stud assist tools (that are long enough)... and then on top of that... you have to put anti-seize on them, so it doesn't seize to your wheel and the brake rotor.
 
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