Honda rims on Nissan?

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Yuk

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I want to plus size the tire/rim combo on my Nissan Sentra from stock 13" rims to a scavenged set of steel 15" rims, from a Honda Civic. Both sets have a 4-100 bolt pattern, but I'm not sure about the centrebore or offset measurements. Does anyone know whether I can get away with this swap?
 
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My son has put his tire/rims on his 92 240sx from his totalled rear ended 97 Honda accord. They're working just fine right now. I think they are Tenso rims. Don't have more specifics unless I check with him.
 
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yeah one thing that might not match up is the hubcentric ring size. if they dont match up, then you may have vibration problems because the wheel wont be perfectly bolted on center relative to the hub.
 
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it doesn't matter if the centerbore isn't the correct size. It's only there to help put the wheel on. As far as them being "off balence", that's total crap. With the use of conical seat lug nuts (if the wheel requires them) it will center itself properly. I have Toyota wheels on my Nissan and Nissan wheels on my Honda.
 
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I also used Nissan wheels on my '99 Civic. I think the brand may be "Denso" not "Tenso" but I don't really know (just trying to add info). I thought that most modern rims use the hub-centric design which placed the bulk of the force the wheels encounter on the center ring rather than the lugs? Greg (I found an application guide from a wheel manufacturer in 2002 that lists bolt patterns for many cars since 1980 if you'd like to see it. Turns out the 13in wheels from a 1981 BMW will fit my Honda)
 

Yuk

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Thanks for the replies.
quote:
I thought that most modern rims use the hub-centric design which placed the bulk of the force the wheels encounter on the center ring rather than the lugs?
I don't know much, but I think I've read/heard this too. It does make sense to me that the hub would be able to support the forces better than the lugs. Greg, I'd love to see that guide! [Cheers!]
 
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if that is the case, then why do wheel manufactures give poeple plastic hub pieces so that it fits tightly. Does plastic that I can break with my pinky support the weight of the car? No. It's entirely the lug nuts.
 
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