Honda coolant

Joined
Jun 18, 2013
Messages
73
Location
Mississippi
I have a 2007 honda rubicon and I'm gonna change all fluids from front to back and was wondering about the formulation of coolant. I was thinking about using zerox Asian formula but I got a lot of peak amam that I need to use so can use that. Looking for opinions and knowledge on this. Thanks.
 
Joined
Mar 12, 2010
Messages
1,052
Location
SE Wisconsin
Originally Posted By: Snowball
I don't have a manual so ? That's why I'm asking..
Zerex Asian is probably OK to use, but I'd gather some more information to confirm. What color is the coolant? What (if anything) does it say on the radiator cap/coolant tank? Can you download a copy of the owner's manual online and check what it says?
 
Joined
Sep 20, 2014
Messages
2,468
Location
Seattle-ish, WA
What Honda says:
Quote:
RECOMMENDED ANTIFREEZE: Pro Honda HP coolant or an equivalent high quality ethylene glycol antifreeze containing silicate-free corrosion inhibitors
The "red" Asian mix (Toyota LLC, Zerex Asian, Pentosin Pentofrost A1) are for their automotive applications. Does not appear they adhere to the same rigidity with power sports. AMAM is an OAT coolant and silicate-free. You are good to go w/that per their statement. The reason there's big concern with this is that some AMAM coolants have a chemical called 2-EHA in it that can eat into some gasket compounds. Here's a thread on that: 2-ethylhexanoicacid
 
Last edited:
Joined
Dec 31, 2012
Messages
343
Location
Wisconsin
I just use the Pro honda stuff, the total amount the system holds isnt going to break the bank. Join us at hondaatvforums.com and get the service manual.
 
Joined
Jul 14, 2009
Messages
1,647
Location
SF Bay Area
You have a Honda.. personally I'd plunk the few extra dollars down for the Honda antifreeze and NOT have any concerns.
 

Snowball

Thread starter
Joined
Jun 18, 2013
Messages
73
Location
Mississippi
I went ahead and used the amam stuff. What came out looked good and was dark green. Totally flushed and even took off over flow reservoir and cleaned it out. This is my dad's four wheeler that I keep at my shop and seldom gets road but I get it out and crank and make a few rounds as I know just sitting just aunt good for nothing. This is its first total service and was really easy. I did call an old friend that used to work at honda where we bought it and he said the peak stuff would be fine. He said he never seen any problems with different coolants with honda machines just do a good flush to keep from mixing to much of 2 types of coolant together he said. Thanks for replies. I will update if any problems arise.
 

JHZR2

Staff member
Joined
Dec 14, 2002
Messages
47,020
Location
New Jersey
Originally Posted By: EricF
You have a Honda.. personally I'd plunk the few extra dollars down for the Honda antifreeze and NOT have any concerns.
+1
 
Joined
Mar 20, 2014
Messages
677
Location
USA
Use Honda fluids. Your engine won't know the difference, plus that is what is used by many on this forum..
 
Joined
Sep 20, 2003
Messages
1,620
Location
Austin, TX
I would stick w/ OEM coolant. My brother had a 97 Civic and it was totaled w/ Sears dropping something into it. Now, if that were to happen to your vehicle do you happen to know which wall u intend to bark at
 
Joined
Nov 20, 2006
Messages
27,007
Location
MA, Mittelfranken.de
Originally Posted By: EricF
You have a Honda.. personally I'd plunk the few extra dollars down for the Honda antifreeze and NOT have any concerns.
+3
 
Joined
Dec 23, 2006
Messages
9,577
Location
Canuck - moved to —> California —> Texas —> ???
To be honest, my biggest worry is mixing coolant types, but if one is doing a complete flush, not a drain and fill, I cannot find any credible information that a different, modern coolant formula caused any problems, except in some heavy duty diesel applications. I understand that going OEM is the safest bet, but on the other hand, most of the components used in the cooling system follow industry standards, so chances of having incompatible materials with a specific type of coolant are very low. Perhaps that is why a lot of owner's manuals have some sort of generic statement about coolant like in my Mazda: "The engine has aluminum parts and must be protected by an ethyleneglycol- based coolant to prevent corrosion and freezing. DO NOT USE coolants Containing Alcohol, methanol, Borate or Silicate. These coolants could damage the cooling system." Although I find the low low silicate G-05 works excellent in my Mazda.
 
Joined
May 29, 2013
Messages
70
Location
KY, USA
Originally Posted By: KrisZ
...but if one is doing a complete flush, not a drain and fill, I cannot find any credible information that a different, modern coolant formula caused any problems, except in some heavy duty diesel applications. I understand that going OEM is the safest bet, but on the other hand, most of the components used in the cooling system follow industry standards, so chances of having incompatible materials with a specific type of coolant are very low.
You are correct. As long as you don't exceed the coolant life span, virtually all chemistries are effective.
 
Joined
Sep 20, 2003
Messages
1,620
Location
Austin, TX
Originally Posted By: KrisZ
To be honest, my biggest worry is mixing coolant types, but if one is doing a complete flush, not a drain and fill, I cannot find any credible information that a different, modern coolant formula caused any problems, except in some heavy duty diesel applications.
My engg mind tells me one CANNOT get a complete flush and that is why sticking w/ OEM is the safest best. Now there is the block bolts (which almost certainly is in the most assinie place in the world), IACV and the heater core (this is a big deal there is nothing that keeps it OPEN) that are in the path of coolants, IMO there is never ever a "complete flush".
 
Joined
Dec 23, 2006
Messages
9,577
Location
Canuck - moved to —> California —> Texas —> ???
Drain as much as you can and run distiller water few times and the flush will be as complete as it gets. The goal is not to get 100% of old stuff out because we all know it not possible, but the majority of it. I agree with the "safe bet" approach, but I always ask why? It's easy to say "why risk it?", but then why risk keeping a car after warranty? Why risk not going to the dealer for service? Why risk other non OEM items like tires, brakes, oil, washer fluid? Why risk keeping a car beyond 150k miles when we know ther are designed for 150k miles? I'm interested in the technical reasons for "why risk it?" and not because everyone says so.
 
Last edited:
Top