Glock 42? Spring tension wow?

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Went to look at a Glock 42 and racking the action was really stiff. Couldn't believe how tight the action was. The thing was so small I couldn't get a good grip on it. Are all the Glocks that tight? My last automatic was a Browning Hi Power and that was smooth as silk. But that was also 35 years ago and now I have some arthritis and carpel tunnel pain from banging away on a PC for 25 years. Maybe I'm just a revolver guy at heart. Am I crazy? shrug
 

AMC

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957
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South Eastern, CT
The glock pistols are normally fairly easy to rack. The reason the glock 42 is so hard to rack is the fact that the pistol is not a true locked breech design and relies on spring pressure to keep the breech shut. The fact that the slide is so light weight also means you need a stronger recoil spring to help the slide cycle reliably. Almost all .380 auto pistols suffer from a hard to rack slide. One of the many reasons I do not like or recommend .380 auto.
 
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Nashville, TN via Memphis
If you think the G42 is hard to rack, just try one of the little Kahr .380s or 9mms. I looked at the Kahrs, then the Glock. I was pleasantly surprised at how easy the Glock was in comparison. Ultimately I went with a SigSauer P938, and love it. 250 rounds so-far with zero malfunctions. If you really like Glocks, I'd wait a few months for the rumored micro-9mm.
 
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Central IA
As others have said, blowback principle guns rely on the mass of the slide and the resistance of the recoil spring to delay the extraction process until the bullet has left the barrel and the pressure in the chamber has dropped. So simple Newtonian physics means a small gun with a low mass slide will need a very very stiff spring. My mom, who has carpal tunnel and arthritis has trouble with her Walther PP in 32acp. I am looking into a Beretta Tomcat to replace it.
 
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I had a G42 and it never malfunctioned once but I couldn't get used to the trigger. Tested a Ruger LCRS...new version with softer trilegger.... and traded the G42. I'm 80yo and have no diff with slides. Try holding it in your right hand while placing the entire left hand over the top of the slide, hold firmly, push with your right hand. You get more leverage that way rather than using a couple finger to pull back on the slide. The LC9S has 4-5 boxes thru it now with zero malfunctions. Soft trigger makes for much better accuracy, however, I miss the lightness of the G42 for carry purposes. BTW, the G42 and the LC9S both have very mild recoil.
 
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Originally Posted By: AMC
Almost all .380 auto pistols suffer from a hard to rack slide. One of the many reasons I do not like or recommend .380 auto.
Completely agree, and that's why I scratch my head when a .380 is recommended to small statured shooters.
 
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Central IA
Originally Posted By: whip
Originally Posted By: AMC
Almost all .380 auto pistols suffer from a hard to rack slide. One of the many reasons I do not like or recommend .380 auto.
Completely agree, and that's why I scratch my head when a .380 is recommended to small statured shooters.
I think it is recommended simply based on the recoil. It is a softer shooting round in a ultra compact lightweight gun than a more powerful round that requires a locked breach. Also, blow backs are pretty darn reliable and accurate on average for their size.
 
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My wife is on the weaker side, she can't rack my 9mm M&P full size or 9mm Shield without struggling but racks her Bersa 380 in a flash. The Bersa is reliable and accurate. I think she would have a hard time with the Glock 42.
 
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Nashville, TN via Memphis
Originally Posted By: tc1446
I had a G42 and it never malfunctioned once but I couldn't get used to the trigger. Tested a Ruger LCRS...new version with softer trilegger.... and traded the G42. I'm 80yo and have no diff with slides. Try holding it in your right hand while placing the entire left hand over the top of the slide, hold firmly, push with your right hand. You get more leverage that way rather than using a couple finger to pull back on the slide. The LC9S has 4-5 boxes thru it now with zero malfunctions. Soft trigger makes for much better accuracy, however, I miss the lightness of the G42 for carry purposes. BTW, the G42 and the LC9S both have very mild recoil.
Good info...thanks... And I think it's awesome that you're on your computer and posting up on message forums at 80 years young! And going to the shooting range! There are plenty of folks a lot younger than you who dont even know what a message forum is! That LC9S is intriguing... I dismissed the standard, hammer-fired LC9 out of hand because of the super-long trigger pull. You like the trigger pull of your LC9S?
 
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1,345
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Lexington, NC
Originally Posted By: john_pifer
Originally Posted By: tc1446
I had a G42 and it never malfunctioned once but I couldn't get used to the trigger. Tested a Ruger LCRS...new version with softer trilegger.... and traded the G42. I'm 80yo and have no diff with slides. Try holding it in your right hand while placing the entire left hand over the top of the slide, hold firmly, push with your right hand. You get more leverage that way rather than using a couple finger to pull back on the slide. The LC9S has 4-5 boxes thru it now with zero malfunctions. Soft trigger makes for much better accuracy, however, I miss the lightness of the G42 for carry purposes. BTW, the G42 and the LC9S both have very mild recoil.
Good info...thanks... And I think it's awesome that you're on your computer and posting up on message forums at 80 years young! And going to the shooting range! There are plenty of folks a lot younger than you who dont even know what a message forum is! That LC9S is intriguing... I dismissed the standard, hammer-fired LC9 out of hand because of the super-long trigger pull. You like the trigger pull of your LC9S?
I like it a lot; however, it is very easy and smooth trigger, but often outside shooting, the first round will let off quicker than I anticipated. I wouldn't mind it having just a tad harder pull. I do like the smoothness of the trigger...nothing quirky like the Glock (don't flame me Glock lovers) and this allows me to shoot reasonably accurate, unlike the G42. Consequently, I enjoy shooting it. I've been shooting 115gr but today shot a few 124gr and couldn't tell the diff. Recoil on both the G42 and Lc9s is pretty soft, and I've got soft hands. If you have large hands, Ruger makes a mag that holds 2 extra bullets with a longer extension. I got one, but prefer just the pinkie extension that comes with standard mags. Eight rounds, one in the pipe and 7 in the mag. Today I ordered a Kahr CW380. WAnted a smaller gun for pockets and liked the smooth trigger of the Kahr. Its like my P45, long super smooth pull, no raspiness when it lets off. I know a bunch of folks have had issues with this model, but I decided to take a chance. I was lucky with the P45 and had no issues with it. It will be a week or more before it comes in. I have several boxes of 380 on hand for testing.
 
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Mahzurrah!
I carry a Kahr CW380 and am a huge fan of the gun. It shoots great and is crazy reliable, but the slide is very very stiff no doubt. Now I know why. I definitely think many females or slighter build shooters could have trouble with the slide. I've been toying with a G42 idea for the better half or maybe just to have now I need to rack one and see how it compares.
 

AMC

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957
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South Eastern, CT
Originally Posted By: Robenstein
Originally Posted By: whip
Originally Posted By: AMC
Almost all .380 auto pistols suffer from a hard to rack slide. One of the many reasons I do not like or recommend .380 auto.
Completely agree, and that's why I scratch my head when a .380 is recommended to small statured shooters.
I think it is recommended simply based on the recoil. It is a softer shooting round in a ultra compact lightweight gun than a more powerful round that requires a locked breach. Also, blow backs are pretty darn reliable and accurate on average for their size.
I agree. I don't want to start a caliber debate buy my advice to most people who want something "low recoil" and easy to handle is just to take their time and learn to shoot 9mm. IMO, anything less than 9mm is really in the poor stopping power category. To make matters worse, .380 acp, 32 acp and 22 magnum cost almost as much if not more than 9mm ammo and availability of all those choices is poor too. If they can't train themselves to shoot light 9mm loads at least, they need to understand their options are pretty limited and stopping power is going to be poor.
 
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I put 380 and 38 special on the threshold for stopping power. The only reason I let my mom have a 32acp is because her hands are just that bad anymore. It can still stop a bad guy but you really have to be a good shot. Luckily for her, she is a former sheriff's deputy and trained back in the day on a Colt Trooper revolver, so she is learned to pull a trigger the right way back in the 60's. I see browning is coming out with a 380 1911. Sadly it is not to spec and uses a poly frame. I think a fullsize or commmander size 1911 in 380 would be an awesome gun for those who need low recoil and have poor hand strength. Be almost like shooting a 6 inch full steel 357 with 38 special loads.
 
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Mahzurrah!
I've been shooting a LOT of .380 (practice with a small pistol is critical) and it is definitely more costly than 9mm, substantially so. I don't consider the .380 underpowered for self defense, especially if you do a little research as to load performance and practice. But the biggest advantage to .380 is I always have it on me. I frankly think a larger .380 would be a hoot but of course a 9mm makes much more sense.
 
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The cost of 380 is a little less in my area than 38 special and about as much as 45acp. So it is more pricey than 9mm, but pretty much everything short of 22lr is.
 
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Originally Posted By: Robenstein
I put 380 and 38 special on the threshold for stopping power. The only reason I let my mom have a 32acp is because her hands are just that bad anymore. It can still stop a bad guy but you really have to be a good shot. Luckily for her, she is a former sheriff's deputy and trained back in the day on a Colt Trooper revolver, so she is learned to pull a trigger the right way back in the 60's.
If she can pull the trigger on a 4 inch revolver, I would think that would be better than the .32ACP. Plus she is familiar with it and properly trained on the platform already. Load 38 wadcutters if she cant handle the recoil anymore.
 
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Originally Posted By: bubbatime
Originally Posted By: Robenstein
I put 380 and 38 special on the threshold for stopping power. The only reason I let my mom have a 32acp is because her hands are just that bad anymore. It can still stop a bad guy but you really have to be a good shot. Luckily for her, she is a former sheriff's deputy and trained back in the day on a Colt Trooper revolver, so she is learned to pull a trigger the right way back in the 60's.
If she can pull the trigger on a 4 inch revolver, I would think that would be better than the .32ACP. Plus she is familiar with it and properly trained on the platform already. Load 38 wadcutters if she cant handle the recoil anymore.
Her gun before was a Ruger Police Service Six. We had to go away from that. The long DA pull made it impossible. Poor lady is a tack driver but her hands are awful. frown
 
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Doog

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Originally Posted By: Slick17601
Not at all, revolvers are way cooler than tupperware.
LMAO...I just got that joke....very funny... crackmeup
 
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