gelled fuel - change filter?

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Living here in Northern Minnesota, I would think the local stations would watch their winter blend of diesel, but apparently not. So I've had my rig (Jeep Grand Cherokee built in Austria with the 2.7L 5 cyl Mercedes diesel) inside an insulated attached garage for a week now after having it not start at -15 degrees. Garage temp is about +30 and I can heat it up beyond that. I seriously suspect a gelled fuel problem, despite the Power Service I also use. Will the garage heat fix my fuel problem, or is there so much wax in the filter that it just plain needs to be changed? I am planning to run straight #1 from here on out in the winter! Unfortunately the tank is full now.

So what about that filter?
 
Have you tried starting it since you placed it in the garage? I would think the heat would re-liquify the wax so it would fire up

I think running it off straight #1 is a bad idea. Have you tried the diesel 911 product? worth a try...
 
If the paraffin came out of suspension, it would all get caught in the filter. You're going to have to move gallons of warm fuel (which ain't gonna' happen until spring) through the filter to dissolve all of it.

I would change the filter, in the warm garage, and start it up in there.

How full is the tank? What fuel do you have in there?

When caught in the sudden cold, if I couldn't fill my diesel (I had a Mercedes 240D in Colorado years ago) with winter fuel, I would cut the existing fuel with 1/4 straight kerosene. The kerosene reduced the power somewhat, but kept the fuel from gelling up. You simply can't heat the block or engine enough to prevent untreated fuel from gelling when you get near zero. It's the temperature in the tank and lines that you've got to worry about. Changing the filter on that MB was a 30 second job, and I hope it's not much worse in your vehicle.
 
Use Power Service White Bottle REGULARLY at fill ups and if you think the diesel is not treated, double the dose. My VW starts in all temps using this and in almost five years, no problems.
 
Originally Posted By: Boomer
Use Power Service White Bottle REGULARLY at fill ups and if you think the diesel is not treated, double the dose. My VW starts in all temps using this and in almost five years, no problems.


So, change the filter?

Or not?
 
It probably couldnt hurt to change the filter, but Im still surprised at the gelled fuel at 30, i always assumed 20 or below was when the problems start. Id try cranking it now, maybe get a charger on it to keep it up, to try and move some of the warmer fuel into the filter. Otherwsie get a small heater under the engine, or let a hair dryer blow towards the fuel filter for an hour or so, hood mostly down to keep heat in. Then get it running and head over to find some diesel 911, and then a decent ride to get it to work its way through the fuel system.
 
I'd also say if you have a metal housing fuel filter, get one of the epoxy-on electric heat pads normally used on oil pans, and plug it in every night. I second the Diesel 911 (red Power Service bottle), unscrew the filter and dump out what's in it, then fill it up with D911 and screw it back on, and start it that way.
 
Originally Posted By: Audios
It probably couldnt hurt to change the filter, but Im still surprised at the gelled fuel at 30, i always assumed 20 or below was when the problems start. Id try cranking it now, maybe get a charger on it to keep it up, to try and move some of the warmer fuel into the filter. Otherwsie get a small heater under the engine, or let a hair dryer blow towards the fuel filter for an hour or so, hood mostly down to keep heat in. Then get it running and head over to find some diesel 911, and then a decent ride to get it to work its way through the fuel system.

No, it was -15 when I had trouble. And I do use Power Service winter treatment. But Minnesota also legislated use of B-5 in the winter, which doesn't help. So now there are two stations I won't buy fuel from in the winter! I haven't tried it for a week, because it's been 10 below for daytime highs all week. I think Astro14 is correct about the filter being full of paraffin. Next Sunday is predicted highs of +19, so I'll go a head and change fuel filter and (hopefully) take it for a drive Sunday.
 
The filter doesn't need to be changed.

Originally Posted By: Astro14
You're going to have to move gallons of warm fuel (which ain't gonna' happen until spring) through the filter to dissolve all of it.


Wrong, this is EXACTLY what the vehicle's fuel system does!

What you need to do is add a little more anti-gel additive, start it and warm it up, then go on a road trip. Fill the tank with winter blend diesel and you're good to go.

Let me guess, the fuel filter is about $100?
 
Originally Posted By: Linctex

The filter doesn't need to be changed.

Originally Posted By: Astro14
You're going to have to move gallons of warm fuel (which ain't gonna' happen until spring) through the filter to dissolve all of it.


Wrong, this is EXACTLY what the vehicle's fuel system does!

What you need to do is add a little more anti-gel additive, start it and warm it up, then go on a road trip. Fill the tank with winter blend diesel and you're good to go.

Let me guess, the fuel filter is about $100?


How much experience do you have with diesels in below zero weather?

The problem is that because cold air is moving over it all the time, the tank itself stays at -15F (or whatever this guy is experiencing) so all that return fuel that bypassed the injectors gets cooled right back down to ambient temperature.

He needs to get a winter blend in the tank, or cut the fuel with Kerosene, because if the fuel has had paraffin come out of solution, it'll take warm fuel or thinner fuel to dissolve it back into solution.

For the OP, if it's been at 30F in the garage for a while, just running might work. You might as well try that first...
 
Siphon out at least 1/4 tank of diesel, put in a FULL bottle of Diesel 911 (MUCH stronger antigel than the PS White Bottle), get it started, drive straight to the closest station and top it off with kerosene. I just had this problem on the GMC 6.2 in my sig, even with the factory heated fuel filter. It actually clogged the frame lift pump & took out two oil pressure sensors-and it was only 6F above zero when it did it.
 
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I'm in your neck of the woods and know how the waxed up filter issue goes. First I've found that any diesel I buy from a BP station isn't treated properly for the temps we see and I'm changing a fuel filter before the end of the tank, Holiday fuel has so far been the best and has never gelled on me. Second, if you can't get fuel that'll stay liquid go with straight #1 and add PS white bottle. It's pretty much kerosene but can be a little harsher on the injection components, the PS white bottle gives you some added gel protection and lubes the injection pump.

Seeing that you've already gelled up, change the fuel filter and use the warm weather this weekend to run down the tank some and refill with good fuel.
 
Originally Posted By: bullwinkle
Siphon out at least 1/4 tank of diesel, put in a FULL bottle of Diesel 911 (MUCH stronger antigel than the PS White Bottle), get it started, drive straight to the closest station and top it off with kerosene. I just had this problem on the GMC 6.2 in my sig, even with the factory heated fuel filter. It actually clogged the frame lift pump & took out two oil pressure sensors-and it was only 6F above zero when it did it.


Wow, that's bad
 
When this happens. fuel filter change is required. Once the filter pleats get clogged up, nothing is going to correct that but a new filter.

Count yourself lucky. About a week and a half ago, I was running Hwy 20 in northern Iowa. A bit chilly. Must have gotten a bad batch of fuel in Des Moines. Even with using additive, I had total shut down twice on Hwy 20 and had to replace filter each time. Nothing like doing this along side the road in the dark. Goes with the territory of using diesel and living up north. Sooner or later, it happens to all of us. This is why I have always advocated that everyone with a diesel carry at least one spare filter and tools to change it during the winter months. And of course, learn how to do it so that they can do it under less than ideal conditions. Kinda like this, the wrong time to learn how to take apart a weapon and fix it is when one is already in the fight. You learn how to do it before hand.

This is one of the major reasons why I will never understand some folk's almost starry eyed wonderment over diesel. Just the mere mention of it and they get all ooh and ahh and seem to exhibit the idea that it is superior to all other fuel and engines on the road. It is just a fuel and engine choice that has a specific place and purpose. If I could totally live without it, I would. Just far and away too many hassles. Somewhat tolerable when there is no other choice, but not worth it a bit if there is a choice.
 
"This is one of the major reasons why I will never understand some folk's almost starry eyed wonderment over diesel. Just the mere mention of it and they get all ooh and ahh and seem to exhibit the idea that it is superior to all other fuel and engines on the road. It is just a fuel and engine choice that has a specific place and purpose. If I could totally live without it, I would. Just far and away too many hassles. Somewhat tolerable when there is no other choice, but not worth it a bit if there is a choice."

I totally agree. I would never buy a diesel powered personal vehicle. I quite honestly can't stand the noise of then and the extra maintenance that goes along as well as having fuel filter clogging issues in really cold weather. I drive a 550HP diesel powered truck at work and at the end of the day, I'm glad to go home in my quiet, gas powered pick-up.
 
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