FYI: 2011-2014 Honda Odyssey Front Brake Rotors

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If you drive a 2011-13 Odyssey (and some 2014's), there is an updated front brake rotor available. According to Honda, the updated front brake rotors have more mass and smaller air vents. Logically, I would expect this to translate to cooler brake temps which would mean more mileage before vibration develops. Brake vibration (due to front rotors) seems to be a huge issue with any of the heavier Honda vehicles (Odyssey, Pilot, etc.); some people have experienced issues as early as 15K. If you are purchasing an aftermarket brake rotor, most of the aftermarket manufacturers have not updated their catalogs for the 2011-13 models. In order to get the updated design front rotors you will need to order rotors for a 2015 Odyssey. I purchased mine from Centric - their part # was 120.40092. I have attached a few pictures of what the updated rotors look like.

Honda Odyssey New Front Brake Rotor.jpg


IMG_6508.jpg


IMG_6512.jpg
 
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Quote
….If you are purchasing an aftermarket brake rotor, most of the aftermarket manufacturers have not updated their catalogs for the 2011-13 models....
Based on a search of the Centric/ APC Auto Technologies parts site itself, they would be included in the "not updated" online catalog listing. Using the part # listed I would not expect other sites like Rock Auto,Tire Rack, etc. to make any change until/unless Centric does. Using RA and TR, looks like ~$12-20 more than the current Centric listed.
 
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That bulletin is from <span style="font-weight: bold">5 years ago</span>. How do aftermarket parts makers not have updated/matching designs yet ? Or, they feel it's not necessary.
 
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I purchased 2 tires from Tire Rack ( I think ) . No problems that I remember . Do they sell brake parts , also . I can guess they sell wheels . What other automotive products do they sell ? Thanks , :-)
 
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Originally Posted by hallstevenson
That bulletin is from 5 years ago. How do aftermarket parts makers not have updated/matching designs yet ? Or, they feel it's not necessary.
A lot of them don't bother to update their listings.
 

The Critic

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Originally Posted by FlyNavyP3
Does the same part apply to 2013 Pilot's?
Not sure. This brake rotor size is used on the 2016+ Pilot's, but the 2016+ is a new body style/platform compared to the 2013's.
 
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Originally Posted by The Critic
Originally Posted by FlyNavyP3
Does the same part apply to 2013 Pilot's?
Not sure. This brake rotor size is used on the 2016+ Pilot's, but the 2016+ is a new body style/platform compared to the 2013's.
The Pilot forum is full of 2016+ owners complaining about their junk rotors. Honda just can't seem to build robust enough rotors for their heavier vehicles.
 
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That screw. grrrr..... once its out, does anyone put it back? I would think that could effect runout if you have to align with the screw?
 
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Originally Posted by LeakySeals
That screw. grrrr..... once its out, does anyone put it back? I would think that could effect runout if you have to align with the screw?
A dab of anti-seize and don't over tighten. All good. Unless the screw is messed up...
 
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And, often it is NOT a Phillips screw. Really. It is a JIS screw, which means if it is really tight, your Phillips will cam out and strip it ... A JIS screw ( Japanese industrial standard ) is close to a Phillips screw, but different enough to be a problem with really tight screws. Any import mechanic will have a set of JIS screwdrivers, or grind off the tip of a regular Phillips.
 
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I bought a set of JIS screwdrivers a few years ago to avoid stripping these type of screws. For Honda's rotor screws, I learned a long time ago to not crank them down as tight as I could. I'd use one hand on with just 2-3 fingers on the driver to snug them up.
 

The Critic

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Originally Posted by hallstevenson
I bought a set of JIS screwdrivers a few years ago to avoid stripping these type of screws. For Honda's rotor screws, I learned a long time ago to not crank them down as tight as I could. I'd use one hand on with just 2-3 fingers on the driver to snug them up.
I remove them using a manual impact screwdriver. Several whacks with a small sledgehammer and they will come out. For installation I do the same- manual impact driver and several hits. Tightening by hand doesn't work for me - the screws will come loose.
 
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Originally Posted by The Critic
Originally Posted by hallstevenson
I bought a set of JIS screwdrivers a few years ago to avoid stripping these type of screws. For Honda's rotor screws, I learned a long time ago to not crank them down as tight as I could. I'd use one hand on with just 2-3 fingers on the driver to snug them up.
I remove them using a manual impact screwdriver. Several whacks with a small sledgehammer and they will come out. For installation I do the same- manual impact driver and several hits. Tightening by hand doesn't work for me - the screws will come loose.
Why are they needed? How do you optimize runout with them there?
 
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Originally Posted by mclasser
Originally Posted by The Critic
Originally Posted by FlyNavyP3
Does the same part apply to 2013 Pilot's?
Not sure. This brake rotor size is used on the 2016+ Pilot's, but the 2016+ is a new body style/platform compared to the 2013's.
The Pilot forum is full of 2016+ owners complaining about their junk rotors. Honda just can't seem to build robust enough rotors for their heavier vehicles.
Lol, going all the way back to at least my 2003 Accord. Big motor (for the time) tiny brakes. I'd replaced the factory pads and rotors by 20,000 miles and haven't looked back. Caused by an overly soft/quiet pad material that would deposit on the rotors if you looked at it sideways and small rotors that ran on the hot side, making the pads deposit on them. Most of the time a more robust pad will cure the problem. And not doing full stops from highway speeds in the big heavy vehicles and coming to a complete stop letting the hot pads deposit on the rotors. That's the one thing I love about my TL, it finally has the right sized brakes for a big car.
 
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I helped a cousin do brakes on a 2005 Buick Lacrosse . It is the first vehicle I personally have worked on to have the little screw . Some were difficult to remove . When we went to go back with them , we oiled the screws and put them in with the head just below the surface of the rotor . Once the wheel in installed , the screws can not come out . The rotors can not come off / get loose as ling as the lug nuts are tight . As far as the end user is concerned , a solution in search of a problem . They are necessary .
 

The Critic

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Originally Posted by LeakySeals
Originally Posted by The Critic
Originally Posted by hallstevenson
I bought a set of JIS screwdrivers a few years ago to avoid stripping these type of screws. For Honda's rotor screws, I learned a long time ago to not crank them down as tight as I could. I'd use one hand on with just 2-3 fingers on the driver to snug them up.
I remove them using a manual impact screwdriver. Several whacks with a small sledgehammer and they will come out. For installation I do the same- manual impact driver and several hits. Tightening by hand doesn't work for me - the screws will come loose.
Why are they needed? How do you optimize runout with them there?
If runout is out of spec, you are supposed to use an on-car lathe. Or correction shims.
 
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Ohio
Originally Posted by The Critic
I remove them using a manual impact screwdriver. Several whacks with a small sledgehammer and they will come out.
I've had to use an impact screwdriver the first time after getting a vehicle but rarely after that. Never had a problem with the screws backing out or falling out though.
 
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Ohio
Originally Posted by LeakySeals
How do you optimize runout with them there?
You can index the rotors 180º to get better runout I think but not 90º like without the screws.
 
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