Ford 3.5L at 31k miles / SuperTech 5w-20 at 11.8k miles

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Because you bought two. Lol. Because you’re going to have kids and tell them to buy Toyota. Because your neighbor has one and told you how good it was. Because Toyota made the decision to build a high quality vehicle, and that works for them. Because Toyota’s (most of them) will run for well past a warranty on 10,000 mile intervals (for some people), and Toyota will hedge their bet by specifying a 5,000 mile interval for almost every driving condition OTHER THAN IDEAL. That would mean cold weather. Hot weather, dusty conditions, extended idling, towing, hauling, city, short trips, hills. They consider all that^^outside of ideal driving or “normal” driving.

Because after the third owner hits at 120,000 miles for most of their cars, it’s way past game over for Toyota’s obligations for the original buyer. That’s a fact.
Yes I bought two but it was because the particular dealership was honest and didn't screw around on the sale (they even dissuaded me from purchasing an extended warranty). But if you notice my latest vehicle is a VW, again mostly because of the dealership. None of my kids own a Toyota, they have a Ford and a Honda, nor do any of my neighbors as far as I know. A lot of domestic trucks in this neighborhood.

But beyond that I'm not sure what the rest of your post means. It's hard to argue that Toyota and Honda aren't exceptionally reliable in the general marketplace. If you wish to pick on a particular manufacturer for not caring what happens after the warranty it might be easier to chose a different one.
 
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Na, actually I use Amsoil SS, 12-15k mile oci's. I'd never go to your shop to get suckered in. You'd probably try to sell me a new air filter and pcv every 5k along with the oil and filter. C'mon man...
No I wouldn't, you're so wrong it's not even funny and I'm glad I don't do that job anymore so I don't have to deal with guys like you. Nobody is going to dissuade you from your opinion and that's fine. Likely nothing will blow up as long as you keep enough oil in it. But don't forget about all the oil burning Toyota's with rings that plug up and get stuck. Everyone blames a design defect but the truth is it's not going to happen if you change earlier and use a good synthetic. If you don't care about a little oil burning or engine noise 20k/a couple years probably won't kill a Toyota. But other engines are much more likely to not tolerate it. Also most modern engines don't have replaceable pcv valves, so I might have sold one the entire time I worked there. Air filters when you can't see light through them anymore.
 
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No I wouldn't, you're so wrong it's not even funny and I'm glad I don't do that job anymore so I don't have to deal with guys like you. Nobody is going to dissuade you from your opinion and that's fine. Likely nothing will blow up as long as you keep enough oil in it. But don't forget about all the oil burning Toyota's with rings that plug up and get stuck. Everyone blames a design defect but the truth is it's not going to happen if you change earlier and use a good synthetic. If you don't care about a little oil burning or engine noise 20k/a couple years probably won't kill a Toyota. But other engines are much more likely to not tolerate it. Also most modern engines don't have replaceable pcv valves, so I might have sold one the entire time I worked there. Air filters when you can't see light through them anymore.
This is why I tape seal my air cleaner shut to prevent techs and doing qualitative checks Based on perception. 30k before I even look at mine but I want to put a vacuum minder on the air box So I don’t open it unnecessarily.
 
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Yes I bought two but it was because the particular dealership was honest and didn't screw around on the sale (they even dissuaded me from purchasing an extended warranty). But if you notice my latest vehicle is a VW, again mostly because of the dealership. None of my kids own a Toyota, they have a Ford and a Honda, nor do any of my neighbors as far as I know. A lot of domestic trucks in this neighborhood.

But beyond that I'm not sure what the rest of your post means. It's hard to argue that Toyota and Honda aren't exceptionally reliable in the general marketplace. If you wish to pick on a particular manufacturer for not caring what happens after the warranty it might be easier to chose a different one.
I’m not picking on a manufacturer or Toyota, I own a Toyota. It’s my daily driver and I am considering doing 10,000 mile oil changes with it. I’ve also owned Lexus in the past, tried the extended oil changes and ended up with an oil burner at 120,000 miles, Lexus didn’t care. And my next car two years later was another Toyota product. If this one becomes an oil burner at 120,000 I can guarantee Toyota will laugh me right out the dealership door if I asked them to pay for a new engine because my rings were stuck in the lands because of their 10,000 mile oil change intervals. But that would be my fault...for not doing research, or doing them when I didn’t meet the stringent perfect driving scenario. I think Toyota and Honda make fantastically reliable vehicles. Yet its up to you to maintain them.

Having said that, I’m going to extend my oil changes out past 5,000 miles because my engine is well maintained, I do a lot of highway driving, I’ll be using a quality synthetic, and my engine historically is “easy on oil”. I don’t think it’ll hurt to experiment, however experimenting with my Lexus I believe did lead to massive amounts of oil consumption Further down the road. But that was my fault for trying (but I never did go beyond Toyota’s recommended maintenance Mileage).

Here’s a tech on YouTube telling us how much Toyota cares.

 
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This is why I tape seal my air cleaner shut to prevent techs and doing qualitative checks Based on perception. 30k before I even look at mine but I want to put a vacuum minder on the air box So I don’t open it unnecessarily.
If it was a regular customer and I knew that the filter looked good the last time I would skip checking it until the next visit, but otherwise checking the air filter is part of a normal oil, filter and lube as I'm sure you are aware. Without always knowing the mileage on the air filter how would you suggest a lube tech decide whether to recommend replacement?
My truck has the vacuum minder so I don't need to needlessly open it and I will change it around 20k or less just because it idles and drives in major dust clouds on construction sites way too often.
 
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If it was a regular customer and I knew that the filter looked good the last time I would skip checking it until the next visit, but otherwise checking the air filter is part of a normal oil, filter and lube as I'm sure you are aware. Without always knowing the mileage on the air filter how would you suggest a lube tech decide whether to recommend replacement?
My truck has the vacuum minder so I don't need to needlessly open it and I will change it around 20k or less just because it idles and drives in major dust clouds on construction sites way too often.
I think we are way in the weeds for this thread. Why not use a sticker on the air box indicating the last air filter change. i worked oilfied road with heavy caliche dust and never had a filter out of service prematurely. I think opening the box is a higher risk than having a filter holding a lot.
 
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I think we are way in the weeds for this thread. Why not use a sticker on the air box indicating the last air filter change. i worked oilfied road with heavy caliche dust and never had a filter out of service prematurely. I think opening the box is a higher risk than having a filter holding a lot.
I agree that it's not ideal to open it anymore than required but I think expecting that it would last just as long under dusty conditions is quite unrealistic.
A sticker is a great idea, too bad they didn't have any where I worked, the oil change stickers only stuck to glass.
Luckily the setup we had was that I would write up the work order and deal directly with the customer, so if you have specific requests, such as "don't touch my air filter" I would have no problem with that as you're just making my job easier.
It was a minimum wage job with no commission so I really had no incentive to sell anything that I didn't feel should be done.
 
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If it was a regular customer and I knew that the filter looked good the last time I would skip checking it until the next visit, but otherwise checking the air filter is part of a normal oil, filter and lube as I'm sure you are aware. Without always knowing the mileage on the air filter how would you suggest a lube tech decide whether to recommend replacement?
My truck has the vacuum minder so I don't need to needlessly open it and I will change it around 20k or less just because it idles and drives in major dust clouds on construction sites way too often.
In general with air filters it's probably better to just leave well enough alone. Air filters usually have a good long lifespan, most of the time the airbox is opened so the shop can upsell.
They're not being diligent for the customers sake. Sometimes in their haste to get to the next victim they don't even button up the airbox properly. @Bryanccfshr has the right idea. Seal it with " Do Not Touch" stickers.
 

dnewton3

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In general with air filters it's probably better to just leave well enough alone. Air filters usually have a good long lifespan, most of the time the airbox is opened so the shop can upsell.
They're not being diligent for the customers sake. Sometimes in their haste to get to the next victim they don't even button up the airbox properly. @Bryanccfshr has the right idea. Seal it with " Do Not Touch" stickers.
Better yet, do your own maintenance at home, and they have no chance to mess with it in the first place.

Bryanccfshr: I think we are way in the weeds for this thread.
You're right; we are.


Here's a summary of this discussion:
- Some, but not all, OEM OCIs are too short
- Some, but not all, OEM OCIs are too long
- Generally it's safe to follow OEM OCIs, though it likely wasteful to do so
- Knowing the history of your engine series, and personal equipment care, helps one understand if longer OCIs are worth the risks
- Using tools such as UOAs, PCs, observations, etc. can help make that OCI decision, IF one understands the risks/benefits
- Some oils, even conventional ones, are far more capable than people would give them credit for
- Some engines are far more tolerant of extended OCIs than some folks give them credit for
- Some engines, regardless of the care, will be at risk because of design issues

Here's what folks should take away from this UOA:
- the n/a Cyclone v-6 engines are very clean running (no history of sludging or combustion-related issues)
- these engines are very tolerant of OCI extensions (very low wear rates; I have over 600 UOAs to show this is true)
- the Walmart ST conventional oil, when used in the right applications, is way more capable of controlling wear and contamination than most folks are willing to admit


That being said, we're done here. The personal bickering and off-topic banter has nothing to do with the engine and oil in this discussion, and since I doubt anyone has any proof that this engine and UOA are at risk, there's nothing to add.
 
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