Food sources. Hunting vs. Farm Raised Meat.. a discussion

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Sep 23, 2008
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Watch Supersize Me 2, the definition of free range means they give access to outdoor but broiler these days got so big so fast they don't want to go outside (obese kids), and they get heart attack under stress.
That is a pretty funny commercial. There are a few chicken barns here with one little door on the side of the barn 200' long barn, and no sign a chicken has ever used it. I suspect they keep the door closed until they get big enough that they can't really travel that well, then pop it open and pray one doesn't go out and catch something. I used to work in a small commercial chicken farm and and for the first 4 weeks they are pretty agile and actually seem to enjoy themselves but after that they have been bred to overfeed themselves and just slog their mass back and forth from the feeder to waterer and try not to injure themselves.
We raise a couple dozen female broilers(because they grow slower and are less injury prone) outside once in a while here, by just stuffing a dozen chicks under a broody hen and they do quite well outside under the care of a hen. They do actually get to run around wherever and eat whatever they can catch and can live quite well for up to 4 months, but even on a reduced diet they get too big and start dislocating legs, so we put them in the freezer after that.
 
Joined
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There are a few places around here where we can buy "live" poultry. I mean - you can't take it home alive, but they're constantly butchering and preparing them. I tried it a few times and was handed a bird carcass that was still warm.

It's a far cry from the time when one would see chickens in cages on the sidewalk in Chinatown. I don't believe it's specifically illegal, but the locations are limited based on zoning.
 
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Silicon Valley
There are a few places around here where we can buy "live" poultry. I mean - you can't take it home alive, but they're constantly butchering and preparing them. I tried it a few times and was handed a bird carcass that was still warm.

It's a far cry from the time when one would see chickens in cages on the sidewalk in Chinatown. I don't believe it's specifically illegal, but the locations are limited based on zoning.
They are now considered "specialty" chicken. I know a friend's friend who still bread them ONLY for the Chinatown sales. The real free range instead of the broiler these days in the refrigerated section.

It is changing in Asia as well. Bird flu can leads to farmers killing all the birds for vector control and butchers closing for a couple days for disinfection. It is just too expensive even if the meat is the same, so they are really used only for high end restaurants or special dishes where freshness is key (chicken soup, sous vide plain whole chicken (flavored when dipping), etc. You don't waste them for orange chicken.
 
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They are now considered "specialty" chicken. I know a friend's friend who still bread them ONLY for the Chinatown sales. The real free range instead of the broiler these days in the refrigerated section.

It is changing in Asia as well. Bird flu can leads to farmers killing all the birds for vector control and butchers closing for a couple days for disinfection. It is just too expensive even if the meat is the same, so they are really used only for high end restaurants or special dishes where freshness is key (chicken soup, sous vide plain whole chicken (flavored when dipping), etc. You don't waste them for orange chicken.

There's the legend here in the San Francisco Bay Area about an old Chinese woman buying a live chicken in San Francisco Chinatown. It changes depending on who tells it, but this gist is that she bought a chicken and tried to take it on MUNI's 30 Stockton bus. When the driver says "You can't bring a live chicken on the bus", she wrings its neck or slams it on a fire hydrant and says "chicken's dead now".

I'm familiar with "yellow skin chicken" and "brown chicken". However, the place I went to didn't really have any like that. Looks like they have online ordering. They have a fairly wide selection including red or white, although they don't say the specific breed. Also turkey, pheasant, quail, duck, geese, etc. Also rabbits, although they're pretty expensive.

 
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There's the legend here in the San Francisco Bay Area about an old Chinese woman buying a live chicken in San Francisco Chinatown. It changes depending on who tells it, but this gist is that she bought a chicken and tried to take it on MUNI's 30 Stockton bus. When the driver says "You can't bring a live chicken on the bus", she wrings its neck or slams it on a fire hydrant and says "chicken's dead now".

Sounds like an urban legend to me.

I used to go to chicken butcher when I was a kid and the process is a lot harder than a fish. You do want the butcher to do it for you. Even in Asia most people don't do it themselves.

Also you don't snap the neck of a chicken on a fire hydrant. You can just twist it 360 degree if you insist. It would taste bad if you just leave it like that on a bus ride without draining the blood though. That sort of defeat the purpose of buying a fresh chicken. Even in Asia people don't do that.
 
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Sounds like an urban legend to me.

I used to go to chicken butcher when I was a kid and the process is a lot harder than a fish. You do want the butcher to do it for you. Even in Asia most people don't do it themselves.

Also you don't snap the neck of a chicken on a fire hydrant. You can just twist it 360 degree if you insist. It would taste bad if you just leave it like that on a bus ride without draining the blood though. That sort of defeat the purpose of buying a fresh chicken. Even in Asia people don't do that.

Well - I know it's just an urban legend, but some might have insisted on bring it home alive and doing it themselves. But it's just a silly story. However, I specifically remember when there were chickens in cages right there on the crowded sidewalk next to all sorts of vegetables.

This place does the slaughter in a room with a closed door, but I've seen it open. They're also halal, so I guess there's a specific ritual. I know they have to bleed it out and then scald the chicken to remove the feathers. I also got the giblets, but I wasn't aware that the gizzard has a yellow membrane. That's usually pulled off when packed with most chickens or when they're sold separately.

Dana Carvey used to have this somewhat racist recurring sketch on Saturday Night Live of a Chinese live poultry seller in Manhattan's Chinatown who just couldn't stand to sell them for slaughter. NBC doesn't seem to have any clips of those sketches in the SNL website.
 
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I live in an area where there's lots of hunting, both for food and sport. I've hunted in the past and would again to provide food if needed. There are people who enjoy hunting just for the sport of it. I disagree with killing and just letting it lay for the buzzards to eat. We have a lady friend that we go to church with that has several people every year bring her deer that they've killed just for the sport of hunting. She processes them for herself and others that want the meat free. I've put venison in my freezer every year for about the past 5 years that was killed by people who just wanted to hunt for the sport of it. I've got shotguns, small caliber rifles, and high power large caliber rifles that could take about any kind of game I wanted but for me it's better and easier to take meat that has been killed by sportsmen instead of letting it go to waste. Hunting is a good thing it helps keep the animal population regulated. I don't know what the deer population is here in KY now but I remember reading an article 25-30 years ago that estimated the deer population in KY was over 1/2 million. Just think what that number would be now if thousands of them were not killed for food/sport every year.
 
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I have no issue with game that is hunted for food. The deer population in NC is a constant danger to motorists. When I lived on a farm in very rural South Dakota we were overrun with rabbits. We hunted them and my aunt and grandmother were both very adept at cooking them. The local river was full of catfish and we fished there frequently. In the fall the pheasants got fat in the cornfields and we took plenty of them too.

Scuba divers in the warm waters of the Caribbean have a new source of food, Lion fish. They are non-indigenous and are voracious feeders. They are destroying the habitat. Spear fishing takes a tiny amount compared to how many there are. They are very edible but should be handled with care.
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Joined
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I have no issue with game that is hunted for food. The deer population in NC is a constant danger to motorists. When I lived on a farm in very rural South Dakota we were overrun with rabbits. We hunted them and my aunt and grandmother were both very adept at cooking them. The local river was full of catfish and we fished there frequently. In the fall the pheasants got fat in the cornfields and we took plenty of them too.

Scuba divers in the warm waters of the Caribbean have a new source of food, Lion fish. They are non-indigenous and are voracious feeders. They are destroying the habitat. Spear fishing takes a tiny amount compared to how many there are. They are very edible but should be handled with care.
View attachment 45998

The toxin in those spines hurts like crazy. The National Park Service is having one heck of a time dealing with them.

 
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I'm an unapologetic gun nut who has never hunted for trophy in my life. I have hunted varmint-coyotes in particular-but as a favor for a farmer friend as he was loosing cattle left right and center despite keeping donkeys or llamas in all of his pastures.

I love meat-not dear in particular but I will eat it if offered-but I have a hard time being the one doing the killing. I know that's potentially hypocritical of me, but I honestly have no desire to hunt. I am an advocate in general of eating what you kill, or at least making sure it's eaten(aside from the coyotes I've killed).

There again, I also don't like a lot of the commonly hunted animals in my area. Dear is a take it or leave it for me. I'd eat turkey, but that's about it.

In a survival situation, sure I'd kill and eat whatever I needed to survive.

I've seen African big-game trophy hunting mentioned here a few places. It's not something I'd ever do, and to me the way it's done legally involves no sport. Still, though, there is evidence that countries that legalize big game hunting overall see a positive impact on their endangered animal populations, and elephants in particular. To summarize it, elephants can be beyond a nuisance, as there's really no practical way to keep them out of your fields and an elephant or two can destroy a year's crop in a day. Consequently, local residents are likely to turn a blind eye to poaching if not encourage it. The countries that allow big game hunting return a significant portion of the proceeds of the(not inexpensive) tags to the local communities where the elephant is selected for harvest, so the locals have an incentive now to protect the local population. The tags are for a specific animal(not the first one you see) that is carefully selected as one beyond breeding age. On one hand, to me it's still not a great practice, but I recognize the benefit and overall value of it.
 
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