Flooded electric ratchet

JHZR2

Staff member
Messages
46,286
Location
New Jersey
Yes, flooded, more or less. Had some tools in a plastic bin, spring downpours.... bin filled with water by an inch or so, ratchet head submerged... you probably get it.

Totally my mistake, forgot to put stuff away.

Good news is it dried and works fine. Bad news is this:

DB268A1A-3AFC-4ABF-AEA7-F9CE1D52AAEE.jpeg


I don’t know if there was a brownish grease in there to begin with, or if there is some level of rust on the internal parts. I’m sure I can take it apart, but not sure if something else might be a good move. Like dunking it in ATF or something. How would you proceed?
 

JRed

Site Donor 2021
Messages
2,311
Location
Virginia
Don't those just have a snap ring holding the mechanism in place? Pull the snap ring off, pull it apart, clean it up, regrease, reassemble. They do have a generic brown grease in them usually.
 
Messages
2,167
Location
missouri
There is evaporust, and several others now that the patent has expired you can use to clean the rust with no after corrosion.

I have had motors with the rotor locked by rust, a week submerged in that stuff, and dry it. Motor runs. Still runs several years later, no disassembly. Motor, bearings, windings, brushes etc. Just blew it out with air, and dried a week.

Try it.

Rod
 
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JHZR2

Staff member
Thread starter
Messages
46,286
Location
New Jersey
There is evaporust, and several others now that the patent has expired you can use to clean the rust with no after corrosion.

I have had motors with the rotor locked by rust, a week submerged in that stuff, and dry it. Motor runs. Still runs several years later,

Try it.

Rod
As of now no signs of rust. Just nasty grease.

But others don’t necessarily share the idea that grease is best for this sort of stuff. Maybe because it’s an electric it doesn’t matter? Not like we’re moving at 2 degree arcs on sensitive fasteners with a tool like this...
 
Messages
13,250
Location
North Carolina
I think I would try and get it hot, not too hot. But hot enough for long enough to get the moisture and any thinned out grease to leak out.
I would put a socket on it, and put it on a hot exhaust manifold bolt and let it heat sink a bit.
 
Messages
1,165
Location
Arizona
get some M1 diff oil in a Dixie cup. submerge the head in there and run it back and forth a few mins. change the oil and do it again till clear. wipe off and good as new. if you really want grease follow up with white lithium afterward.
 
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