Flash point question?

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Why does M1 10W-30 has a higher flash point then thicker M1 0W-40? M1 10W-30 is 244 C M1 0W-40 is 230 C I assume higher flash point means less deposits right?
 
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I think the NOACK volatility rating might be more meaningful. Both flash points are excellent. The NOACK might tell more about potential consumption/burn-off. Do you have these numbers?
 
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quote:
Originally posted by zoomzoom: Why does M1 10W-30 has a higher flash point then thicker M1 0W-40? M1 10W-30 is 244 C M1 0W-40 is 230 C I assume higher flash point means less deposits right?
My guess is that flash point is much more strongly correlated with the base oil (or front "W" number) than the back number.
 
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10W-30 probably uses no VI's and the 0W-40 for sure uses some. This could be it. [I dont know] I don't see a reason to be concerned about deposits with either.
 
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The 10w-30 NOACK is 6% and the 0w-40 is 8.8%. It seems like higher flash point relates to lower NOACK. In theory; high FP and low NOACK numbers mean less VII or better/thicker base stock therefore less varnish IMHO. Most varnish forms in the hottest areas; in the ring-lands, just below the oil control ring, on the valve stems and lifters. So it makes sense with a higher FP there's less burn off in these "hot" areas, so lower NOACK % & less varish! I wonder how redline would perform in these areas? Steve [ April 21, 2004, 04:23 AM: Message edited by: 69 Riv GS ]
 
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quote:
Originally posted by zoomzoom: Motorbike I belive that result was a fluke..There is no way 0W-40 would have higher flash point then their 15W-50?
That does seem odd. Perhaps a different combo of base oil explains the apparent discrepancy. Just a thought.
 
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ekpolk I feel certain that more of something is blended into the 0w-40 that raises the flash point be it base oil or ? This oil has been ridiculed here at BITOG far too long IMO . It's been said here that it uses cheap VII's that will dirty up the engine it's ran in and more when in fact it is an proprietory formula to include the VII's used in it that really not too much is known about . My personal testing of this oil in a family members LS1 shows this oil is just getting in stride at around 6k miles and the only reason I'm not using it is because the low performance engines I use synlubes in are doing just fine on 10 and 12 cSt oils currently but as the miles accumulate I'll probably switch to the 0w-40 at least for the warmer 6 months of the year where I live .
 
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I don't think either the flash point or volatility have much to do with the deposits from the oil. It is not like water spots when you wash your car, or limed up radiators from high mineral water. Fill a radiator with antifreeze and distilled water, and it will never lime up, no matter how long you let it go. You will eventually have corrosion problems when the additives are depleted. The deposits from the oil are not something that was in the oil you added. They form from a lack of oxidative stability. This relates to inherent properties of the base stock and is fortified by additives. Other additives, including the VI improvers, make things worse. Even the most stable hydrocarbons will burn readily if exposed to flame when hot enough to vaporize enough. It is the less stable material in the oil that oxidizes or breaks down and causes deposits. This is why the less stable it was, and older you let the oil get in the engine, the more deposits you have. Use good stuff, and change at appropriate intervals, and all of your engine will stay clean.
 
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MOTORBIKE: It's my understanding that the quick "closed cup" test isn't nearly as accurate as the ASTM D 92 standard. I think the 0w-40 is a good choice in sone applications. It's tweaked somehow(maybe more Alkylated Napthalene)[guessing] to achieve the 0w and wide viscosity spread, but I have a hard time believing its anything that extra trick at its price point(same as the other weights). The whole idea of SuperSyn technology was to improve performance while reducing manufacturing costs. Steve [ April 21, 2004, 12:59 PM: Message edited by: 69 Riv GS ]
 
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