External wall faucet/spigot help

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I've been trying since fall to get this brass hose connector off the spigot/faucet. I gave up and cut the hose. I may as well replace the whole thing. Anyone know what type of faucet/spigot this is? Twist on or welded pipe? I can't tell by looking at it.

20190206_030026.jpg
 
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whats on the other side of of the outside wall? Can you get to the pipe coming in from the faucet? Copper pipe? I would put in a freeze-proof faucet. New faucets will have a backflow presenter so you cannot siphon insecticide in a hose end sprayer back into your home water pipes and drink it.
 
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I bet it is welded. You could have someone brace the spigot with a pipe wrench while you use an adjustable wrench on the brass collar. Maybe some penetrating oil for good measure.
 
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Two pipe wrenches should spin it off. One holding the spigot to keep it from turning, and another to turn the brass fitting off.
 
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Originally Posted by cjcride
I bet it is welded. You could have someone brace the spigot with a pipe wrench while you use an adjustable wrench on the brass collar. Maybe some penetrating oil for good measure.
Originally Posted by old1
Do what cjcride says. It looks like you have been using a pliers on it. PS, pliers are not wrenches.
+2
 
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Can't you check from the other side? Crawlspace or basement or is this slab construction? Did the contractors nail that hose Bibb in place or screw? If they nailed it they should be nailed themselves. Hacks. To add: my guess is it was a premade package with the hose Bibb and pipe coming out the back. If that's the case then cut it from the back and run a stub out thru the siding with a proper threaded fitting. Then get a new Bibb.
 
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U have a bigger problem than that hose. That is not a freeze proof faucet. It is just a hose bib. You are New Hampshire? It gets cold there. It can freeze and break the pipe in the wall. If you are in the south, then carry on. Rod
 
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Never welded, can't weld copper, it would be soldered or threaded. You have to go to the other side and you have to turn the water off. Buy a freeze proof faucet!!! Peerless is a good name.
 
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Yup that is not freeze proof because of how the handle is angled upward, and not straight out. This means the part that shuts off the water supply is exposed to outside air.
 

LeakySeals

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Will look into changing both in the spring. They are the same. It was the coldest since the house was built last Month. We keep the heat on in the basement so everything is warm all the way to the spigot. Also I have a valve to shut the water off. I need to move stuff to get close take a pic. I was using 2 channel locks on that true value hose repair fitting. Its like butter. Stuck. Should have just bought a new hose. I do have one real pipe wrench will try with that and a large adjustable. See what happens
 
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When you say you have a valve for shutoff are you talking about this faucet in particular? Since you have a basement, all outside faucets shout have shutoff valves inside. That's the best solution.
 
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Best move is to turn off the shutoff inside & leave the outside faucet open slightly, and the hose off of it to allow the water to drain out. I agree with the guys above that said 2 pipe wrenches, one to hold, one to turn. It'll come off! If it breaks off, it's a good excuse to get a frost-free one-which moves the shutoff to the inside, where it is warm-but you still have to disconnect the hose to allow it to drain. It is possible to break a frost-free one, I've had to replace them when somebody used the hose to do something during a warm snap & forgot to disconnect it again.
 

LeakySeals

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I just tried it with two pipe wrenches. Nothing. 2 vice grips large. Nothing. Feels like I could rip it right off the wall if I wanted to. Something must have happened between the two metals because I've never had something like this happen before. I'm pretty good with my grinding wheel. Should I try cutting into it? Or just wait till spring and cut the whole thing off from inside the house?
 
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Have you got a Dremel handy? You could cut several grooves in the brass part you're trying to get off. 3 or 4 cuts just to the point of hitting the faucet threads will do wonders to loosen the connectors resolve. Use a thin blade screwdriver to spread the cuts helps too.
 
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I'm with the others - -you really want a "freeze proof" faucet that's about a foot long when looking at it in the store. Not just a plain hose bib like that.
 
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Originally Posted by double vanos
Have you got a Dremel handy? You could cut several grooves in the brass part you're trying to get off. 3 or 4 cuts just to the point of hitting the faucet threads will do wonders to loosen the connectors resolve. Use a thin blade screwdriver to spread the cuts helps too.
This works great - I've removed MANY rusted nuts with a cut off wheel this way
 
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Generally speaking, hose bibs that look like that are threaded. However, I can't guarantee that, and I wouldn't want you to twist something off inside the wall. As far as getting the hose connector off, yeah, I'd cut it. Sometimes if you cut a slot in it, you can spread it enough with a screwdriver to get it off. It looks like brass, but manufacturers have been known to color other metals to look like brass. Zinc, in particular, will freeze tight to the brass and be almost impossible to unscrew. Anyway, if you cut it, you can remove it. If you do slight damage to the hose threads on the hose bib, it shouldn't matter - garden hoses seal with a gasket rather than the threads.
 
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Originally Posted by Linctex
Originally Posted by double vanos
Have you got a Dremel handy? You could cut several grooves in the brass part you're trying to get off. 3 or 4 cuts just to the point of hitting the faucet threads will do wonders to loosen the connectors resolve. Use a thin blade screwdriver to spread the cuts helps too.
This works great - I've removed MANY rusted nuts with a cut off wheel this way
Yep just go slow. I have a mini hitachi 12v "dremel" works great.. if its bigger I use the dewalt brushless grinder with the 1/8" wide wheel to slow me down cutting it. I have probably cut off 50 tire valvestem caps with the hitachi dremel. those stupid metal ones that sieze up solid and you end up turning the whole valve stem instead of the cap Same principle with the hose. Also you dont really need to replace you can drain it.. or even buy one of those $2 Styrofoam outside covers if its piped in from a heated basement.
 
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