Experiment comparing G12, Dex-Cool and Peak

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Never seen it before but it's interesting. Not sure how much relevancy it has in comparison to how it would perform in the engine but still interesting.
 

ChiaroBlue

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I am guessing that the results of the test reasonably accurately reflect the relative anti-corrosion properties of the fluids... The test could of course be improved by redoing the test with hot fluids as well, and by using the same alloys as are typically used in engines. The fact that cold fluids were tested is less of problem (imho) because most cars sit longer unused in the garage anyway than at operating temperature.
 
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likely these results would be extremely different at high temps, under pressure, and without the electricity applied to the sample metals.
 

ChiaroBlue

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Presumably, the voltage applied (and the resulting electrical current) accelerates the process of galvanic corrosion. Is it reasonable to assume that a fluid could the (relatively) best at preventing corrosion at low voltage but the worst when higher voltage is applied? In both cases, would it not matter how well the fluid impedes electrical current (whether applied or resulting from galvanic process itself)? Likewise, I assume a higher temperature would result in faster corrosion. Is there any reason to expect that a fluid that is not very good at preventing corrosion when cold would be any better when hot? I am not saying that this cannot be the case, just asking for the reasoning behind such an expectation.
 
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Please note that I like the experiment. But the electricity is not always present in properly isolated radiators and other components of the cooling system. The fact is there are a lot of inferential deductions made and no real proof. The only way to do that would be to use real vehicles in real service, which of course would be expensive. I have a lot of experience with Dexcool in very high mileage fleet trucks with heat exchangers in the system for aftermarket equipment. Even at ridiculous mileages (even up to 1/2 million miles!) there is zero corrosion, pitting, etc. YMMV. Great post, though...
 
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Yep, interesting experiment. After having seen what he did, I'd like to see the same setup, but now without the electrical voltage applied. Instead, bridge the copper wires with a digital voltmeter, and then replace it with a microammeter. Presumably the one that produces the highest voltage potential and the highest current generated would be the worst coolant protector. Conversely, the one with the lowest voltage and current developed is presumably the best. I recall a crude test mentioned somewhere in these forums years ago of an engine coolant's remaining protection was to measure the voltage with a digital meter between the coolant itself through the radiator filler hole and an engine ground. IIRC, anything over 1.2 volts was not acceptable.
 
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Originally Posted By: SteveSRT8
Please note that I like the experiment. But the electricity is not always present in properly isolated radiators and other components of the cooling system. The fact is there are a lot of inferential deductions made and no real proof. The only way to do that would be to use real vehicles in real service, which of course would be expensive. I have a lot of experience with Dexcool in very high mileage fleet trucks with heat exchangers in the system for aftermarket equipment. Even at ridiculous mileages (even up to 1/2 million miles!) there is zero corrosion, pitting, etc. YMMV. Great post, though...
Same here. In spite of Dexcool's life rating, several GM techs told me never to do anything to the cooling system, ever, unless there was a failure or repair to necessitate it. Trucks and vans have since gone on to the scrappers (never for drivetrain failure) with factory fill Dex, and when finally drained, showed nothing inside.
 

ChiaroBlue

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Originally Posted By: Greasymechtech
Fast acting vs slower acting antifreeze additives.... water movement....heat cycling.....
...cavitation damage, acids introduced into the coolant by exhaust gas leakage, motor oil contamination... Point taken, there are other things happening in a real engine. Nevertheless, being an owner of a collectible car (with an aluminium engine) that sits the great majority of its life in the garage being trickle charged, the test would seem somewhat relevant. Less so for a fleet of trucks being driven 24/7.
 
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