European Ext Drain: Gas vs Diesel

Status
Not open for further replies.
Joined
Nov 15, 2002
Messages
8,937
Location
SC
I admit to being a bit perplexed when comparing the extended drain numbers for the various European auto makers. The ones that produce both gas and diesel cars all list LONGER drain intervals for DIESEL engines. I'd always assumed that diesel engines were actually harder on oil than gas engines, so what is behind the longer recommended drain interval for European auto diesels? Larger sump capacity? Do these engines utilize bypass filters, where the gas engines are just full-flow? Any ideas?
 
Joined
Dec 2, 2002
Messages
6,388
Location
Washington St.
Are these extended drains for diesels using ACEA B oils or ACEA E oils? The B oils are for light duty diesels while the E oils are much more robust oils suitable for heavy duty engines. I agree with a diesel engine being harder on oil than a gasoline engine, but also consider the oil usage here in the U.S. If you account for the larger sump in a heavy diesel and figure the number of gallons of fuel burned between oil changes as a way to figure the "work" on an oil, a diesel engine still gets lots longer on an oil fill than a gasoline engine. Ken [ July 07, 2003, 05:01 PM: Message edited by: Ken2 ]
 
Joined
May 28, 2002
Messages
2,480
Don't know if these 2 things mean anything...but, 1. diesel engines usually recommend a thicker oil grade eg. 15-40 and 2. diesel engines usually work on the lower end of the rpm spectrum...some have 4.5k as the rpm red line.
 

G-MAN

Thread starter
Joined
Nov 15, 2002
Messages
8,937
Location
SC
quote:
Originally posted by Ken2: Are these extended drains for diesels using ACEA B oils or ACEA E oils? The B oils are for light duty diesels while the E oils are much more robust oils suitable for heavy duty engines.
I'm talking more about an oil (for example, Mobil 1 0w40) which meets the extended drain specs for a given mfg for both gas and diesel (for example, GM's European LL spec for gas and diesel) but the spec itself allows for longer drains for diesels than for gas engines, but it's still the SAME oil.
 
Joined
May 24, 2003
Messages
811
Location
Greece
diesel engines have taken a big proporsion in almost all european countries.In some of them over 50% .Lower consumption-emissions and engine longevity are factors you can't ignore.
 
Joined
May 24, 2003
Messages
811
Location
Greece
[Off Topic!] "The percentage of new cars bought in western Europe which are diesel-engined rose from 22% in 1997 to 30% in 1999 and is expected to reach 42% in 2005 (Le Monde, 19 December 2000, quoting figures from the French Ministry for Economic Affairs). In 2000, diesel-engined cars accounted for 34% of car sales in Italy, 49% in France, 54% in Spain and 56% in Belgium (ibid.). Even in Germany, where the Greens have long fought against diesel, because of its carbon particle emissions, 30% of sales last year were of diesel-engined cars, perhaps because they produce less of the CO2 emissions thought to produce climate change (ibid.). In many EU countries diesel is 20% to 25% cheaper per litre than petrol and less duty is paid on it. Moreover, diesel engines consume less fuel per mile."
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top