Espresso

95% of the time I'm making lattes, so the espresso I use from it works out well.
 
Originally Posted by GSCJR
thumbsup No need to complicate things!
Certainly true. I remember being very happy with my old $60 Mr. Coffee espresso machine back in the day and using previously ground beans. Then I became a snob, but it's more work, and I'm not totally sure that it tastes all that much better.
 
Umbria beans are as good as Italian products. Roasted in USA. You can give them a try, especially their Gusto Crema blend. They do not overfry and burn the bean like most US roasters do. or... switch to Japanese green teas and live longer smile
 
Originally Posted by Quattro Pete
Originally Posted by GSCJR
thumbsup No need to complicate things!
Certainly true. I remember being very happy with my old $60 Mr. Coffee espresso machine back in the day and using previously ground beans. Then I became a snob, but it's more work, and I'm not totally sure that it tastes all that much better.
I agree with you, it can be a lot of work to make a good espresso. Sometimes I can't be bothered so I use my Nespresso or put a moka on the stove. Right now I'm using a vintage Saeco automatic that uses pre-ground coffee. I grind it fresh, dump it into the hopper and it delivers a crema like you've never seen! Here's one in action but mine doesn't have the passive cup heater on top so I use the hot water function to heat my demitasse right before brewing. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TMXZba3QJZI
 
The problem with espresso that doesn't come from a good machine is heat. The water needs to be between 190-195 F for the proper extraction without the nasty by-products. A good stable PID is great. Hotter water from lesser machines/stovetop cookers etc unleashes the acids that start occurring above 195F. I have no issue with what someone uses and likes and support whatever that may be. My folks used a percolator growing up for crissakes. If there ever was a way NOT to make coffee that was it. MJB,Yuban,Maxwell House,Folgers, C&S....etc Whatever was on sale and boiled in that percolator is what we got and you best not complain.
 
Originally Posted by sloinker
The problem with espresso that doesn't come from a good machine is heat. The water needs to be between 190-195 F for the proper extraction without the nasty by-products.
Extraction temperature depends on the particular beans that you're using. Some beans call for higher extraction temps. For example, the roaster of Malabar Gold stuff I bought recently recommends using 202-205F. General rule of thumb is lower temperatures for darker roasts and higher temperatures for lighter roasts. And sometimes you just have to experiment and see what you like best.
 
Originally Posted by Quattro Pete
Originally Posted by sloinker
The problem with espresso that doesn't come from a good machine is heat. The water needs to be between 190-195 F for the proper extraction without the nasty by-products.
Extraction temperature depends on the particular beans that you're using. Some beans call for higher extraction temps. For example, the roaster of Malabar Gold stuff I bought recently recommends using 202-205F. General rule of thumb is lower temperatures for darker roasts and higher temperatures for lighter roasts. And sometimes you just have to experiment and see what you like best.
Fair enough, not quite the 212+ on the stove top. I've been using Italian roast for over a decade now. Many machines max out temp wise at 205F iirc.
 
Originally Posted by sloinker
Many machines max out temp wise at 205F iirc.
Yup. The little Breville I use defaults to 200F, and I can go 4F up or down from there.
 
The temperature discussion had me curious to see what the temperature of my espresso is but I'm not sure how accurate my test was. I used my digital multi-meter with a an instant read temperature probe and the hot water function only delivered 150F.
 
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Originally Posted by GSCJR
The temperature discussion had me curious to see what the temperature of my espresso is but I'm not sure how accurate my test was. I used my digital multi-meter with a an instant read temperature probe and the hot water function only delivered 150F.
FYI, the temp we're talking about is at the head. By the time it comes out of the head and flows into the cup, it'll be quite a bit lower.
 
Okay, I'll redo the test; Thanks QP. What if I take a reading at the aluminum block where the water enters the brew group in behind the filter screen? I can easily remove the front cover do do this. Just did it 194 F.
 
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I think for temperature measuring accuracy and consistency that you need to do a raw water pull followed by the actual espresso pull. By the time the water exits the group head and contacts the basket and grounds which are relatively cool the temperature diminishes rapidly.
 
Good information. For now I'm happy with what I'm using, but that has a lot to do with the fact that I'm making lattes and just adding the espresso into steamed milk. Therefore, it's not espresso on its own and the quality or lack of, is masked. Still comes out great and far cheaper then going to a coffee place.
 
BTW, I don't drink straight espresso either. I mix it with hot milk and hot water, and a bit of sugar. The key is to find beans that are strong enough (without being acidic or burnt tasting) so that coffee flavors don't get drowned in milk. Took me a while, but I finally found a local roaster that offers something that works for me, so that I don't have to order it online all the time. I typically pull a 30g espresso shot (from 17-18g of beans), and mix it with 60g of hot whole milk and 60g hot water.
 
Originally Posted by sloinker
I think for temperature measuring accuracy and consistency that you need to do a raw water pull followed by the actual espresso pull. By the time the water exits the group head and contacts the basket and grounds which are relatively cool the temperature diminishes rapidly.
I was unsuccessful at getting an accurate temperature this morning but I'm not giving up! Just have to find a way to hold the temp probe while pulling water then an espresso shot all with one hand! Maybe it's time to invest in a super automatic, NOT!
 
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Originally Posted by buster
Good information. For now I'm happy with what I'm using, but that has a lot to do with the fact that I'm making lattes and just adding the espresso into steamed milk. Therefore, it's not espresso on its own and the quality or lack of, is masked. Still comes out great and far cheaper then going to a coffee place.
That sounds like a flat white.
 
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