Ebola Information

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I know the last thread about Ebola went off the rails like a crazy train, but I think that there should be some real information posted about it for informational purposes. This website has some real definitions, data and maps regarding the previous outbreak in 2009 as well as 2014 from WHO. I found the maps particularly interesting as there is a definite similarity on its paths. Anyways, loads of information to process. http://www.who.int/csr/disease/ebola/en/
 
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What is odd to me is that we bring the very sick people through the Atlanta Airport. Almost everyone who travels has to go through Atlanta. Maximum possible exposure. Just say'in. A small medical jet could land almost anywhere.
 
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I was scheduled to go thru Atlanta airport that day but hearing the news in time allowed me to change my travel plans. When it comes to a situation with these possible consequences, no matter how small the risk I find that not being there is the best option. Somehow I just don't trust government officials when it comes to a technical decision.
 
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Ebola holds no risk of ever being a Great Plague. If it did, it would have taken place long ago. These viruses can flourish only under a narrow set of conditions. If I was in an airport where someone with it were being brought into the States, I would not be concerned at all.
 
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More than half the danger of Ebola is the Fear generated since the book 'Hot Zone' was published. If there was an outbreak in the U.S. I think I would be more afraid of the hysteria than the risk of the disease itself
 
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Originally Posted By: BigBird57
What is odd to me is that we bring the very sick people through the Atlanta Airport.
Pretty sure neither one of the two ebola-sick Americans were brought in through the Atlanta terminal. They were taken directly from the plane and into a quarantine vehicle. And they actually landed at Dobbins Air Reserve Base, not at Hartsfield-Jackson.
 

Astro14

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Originally Posted By: Cristobal
Ebola holds no risk of ever being a Great Plague. If it did, it would have taken place long ago. These viruses can flourish only under a narrow set of conditions. If I was in an airport where someone with it were being brought into the States, I would not be concerned at all.
Really? That's your professional medical opinion? You're saying that we don't even need precautions against it, because, it can't flourish here? Further, if there is no risk, then please explain how two health care providers, who followed the precautions, contracted the disease...
 
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Originally Posted By: BigBird57
What is odd to me is that we bring the very sick people through the Atlanta Airport. Almost everyone who travels has to go through Atlanta. Maximum possible exposure. Just say'in. A small medical jet could land almost anywhere.
Are you planning to touch the bodily fluids or blood? Is the patient just walking through the airport in their street clothes? Or is said patient isolated by use of biohazard measures?
 

Smokescreen

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Lets not get all crazy here and stick to what they know: ************************** From http://www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/lab-bio/res/psds-ftss/ebola-eng.php MODE OF TRANSMISSION: In an outbreak, it is hypothesized that the first patient becomes infected as a result of contact with an infected animal (15). Person-to-person transmission occurs via close personal contact with an infected individual or their body fluids during the late stages of infection or after death (1, 2, 15, 27). Nosocomial infections can occur through contact with infected body fluids due to the reuse of unsterilized syringes, needles, or other medical equipment contaminated with these fluids (1, 2). Humans may be infected by handling sick or dead non-human primates and are also at risk when handling the bodies of deceased humans in preparation for funerals, suggesting possible transmission through aerosol droplets (2, 6, 28). In the laboratory, infection through small-particle aerosols has been demonstrated in primates, and airborne spread among humans is strongly suspected, although it has not yet been conclusively demonstrated (1, 6, 13). The importance of this route of transmission is not clear. Poor hygienic conditions can aid the spread of the virus (6). INCUBATION PERIOD: Two to 21 days, more often 4 - 9 days (1, 13, 14). COMMUNICABILITY: Communicable as long as blood, secretions, organs, or semen contain the virus. Ebola virus has been isolated from semen 61 days after the onset of illness, and transmission through semen has occurred 7 weeks after clinical recovery SURVIVAL OUTSIDE HOST: The virus can survive in liquid or dried material for a number of days (23). Infectivity is found to be stable at room temperature or at 4°C for several days, and indefinitely stable at -70°C (6, 20). Infectivity can be preserved by lyophilisation. ***************************** My opinion from the readings: They describe how communicable it can be. Under optimal conditions like a lab Ebola can be spread from direct contact to airborn...which indicates an atomization of secretions. Sneezing atomizes saliva. Secretions left on a surface, then ingested or in touch with a mucous membrane of an unaffected person via the eyes, nose is a known possibility.
 
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Viruses mutate, change, and adapt. Just because it isn't airborne today doesn't mean it won't be tomorrow. Figuratively speaking. There could be scenarios where this things gains traction and starts rolling. And always count on that whatever the government is releasing about something, there is half again as much about it they are not releasing to avoid the public jumping to conclusions.
 
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Well, it looks like this thread is going to be yet another train wreck because of all the panicked people. The only people for the most part who get this virus get body fluids or blood on them in large amounts, or needle sticks. Medical personnel. Caregivers. Funeral personnel. In parts of Africa, people will touch the dead. Even so, there are few infections. In the early eighties, I saw crazies flip out because of AIDS. It was totally unnecessary and caused a lot of innocent people to be bullied in various forms.
 
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Since you're good with it, then you'd be good with having someone infected with the virus come to your kid's classroom and speak, and then sit with your child in the cafeteria at lunch time? Yeah, I bet. CDC should have consulted with you before escalating to level 1 emergency response yesterday I guess.
 

Astro14

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Originally Posted By: Cristobal
The only people for the most part who get this virus get body fluids or blood on them in large amounts, or needle sticks. Medical personnel. Caregivers. Funeral personnel. In parts of Africa, people will touch the dead. Even so, there are few infections.
For the most part....except when those who take precautions get sick, even though they shouldn't get sick, because those precautions prevent transmission of the disease. Those precautions work and you are safe because we understand the transmission vector completely...except that we don't...because even the CDC and WHO are currently "hypothesizing" the vector (their words). And you're safe, and this is all silly over reaction....that's why the CDC just went to its highest alert posture, giving them more authority to act....
 
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Originally Posted By: LoneRanger
Since you're good with it, then you'd be good with having someone infected with the virus come to your kid's classroom and speak, and then sit with your child in the cafeteria at lunch time? Yeah, I bet. CDC should have consulted with you before escalating to level 1 emergency response yesterday I guess.
The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Wednesday issued its highest alert for an all-hands on deck response to the Ebola crisis in West Africa. That's on the other side of the Atlantic, in case you didn't know.
 
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