Duct tape as temporary rustproofing? Good, bad, waste of time?

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25,050
Location
ON, Canada eh?
Originally Posted by Glam_Stachee
Originally Posted by StevieC
This vehicle was from 1986. It was 22 years old when it was scrapped. It's not 22 years old now. grin2 FWIW = For What It's Worth (sorry)
Alright, my bad, thanks a bunch.
It's ok... I should have listed it as 1986 Caravan, I see how my post could have been confusing and referencing the vehicle being 22 years old now.
 

4WD

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17,387
Location
Texas
If it's small gravel … something like this is good but not sure if you can find it there or order some

148A19E1-A893-46C8-991A-10AE5D9E8C09.png
 

Glam_Stachee

Thread starter
Messages
40
Location
Bosnia and Herzegovina
Originally Posted by 4WD
If it's small gravel … something like this is good but not sure if you can find it there or order some
Alright, that seems promising, I think there should be some similar products over here.
 
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1,073
Location
Northern New York
Try just tacky oil( chain saw bar oil) mixed with old or new Auto tranny fluid. Heat it up and spray. I bet you could use a pump spray bottle or cheap garden sprayer as well. Do it a few times a winter . I have seen few things that protect like good old auto tranny fluid. I had an old GMC which had a tiny tranny leak. It misted under there just a tiny bit and it was so small I just added some occasionally. That truck was a rust bucket but all around that leak and behind it looked like it just rolled out of the factory. The paint was perfect as well. There's a YouTube showing how to keep your inner door lowers from rusting using petroleum jelly and ATF as well . It all works better than nothing and is vert easy to apply and stores indefinitely, just shake it up. Same goes for penetrating oil, save your money just mix ACETONE / DEXTRON 50/50 and shake before spraying. It's all I've used for years so save the old ATF when you change it because it's useful!
 
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26,411
Location
MA, Mittelfranken.de
Originally Posted by Glam_Stachee
Originally Posted by 4WD
If it's small gravel … something like this is good but not sure if you can find it there or order some
Alright, that seems promising, I think there should be some similar products over here.
Teroson should be available where you are their product is WT S3000 AQUA chip and undercoating.
 
Messages
1,357
Location
Lexington, NC
Do you have access to linseed oil? I once had a motorcycle trailer badly rusted, painted with Linseed oil (takes long time to dry) but several years later the trailer had no rust. It was sitting all that time outside, but never used, so it had no road time on it. What year/type car do you have? Just curious.
 
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3,646
Location
Worst Case, Ontario
Originally Posted by tc1446
Do you have access to linseed oil? I once had a motorcycle trailer badly rusted, painted with Linseed oil (takes long time to dry) but several years later the trailer had no rust. It was sitting all that time outside, but never used, so it had no road time on it. What year/type car do you have? Just curious.
Bingo! Boiled linseed oil (BLO) should be pretty easy to find. It takes a while to dry, but you can build it up with several coats over time. You might have to wait until the summer, it takes a while to dry even in the heat. I coated a vise with it after immersion in a molasses bath. It flash rusted immediately (very humid in Toronto during the summer) but once I coated it with BLO, it stopped rusting. Interesting fact: Apparently BLO can be painted over, but I've only seen that mentioned on stationary objects, not vehicles.
 
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Messages
36,639
Location
ME
I'd get a can of that rubberized undercoating *just for* the inner fenders as that's a very high wash area. Also the undercoating there is noise reduction. I'd also get one can of "fluid film" every fall and spray down the sub-frame, suspension bolts, and brake lines where they go through various clips, connections, and other funky spots where salt collects. Feel free to substitute used oil at will. I have considered melting down stupid candles-in-jars that seem to appear every holiday season and mixing that wax with old oil but haven't gotten to it yet.
 

JC1

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6,169
Location
Oshawa, Ontario Canada
To the OP (Original poster) are you going to fix the body work eventually or its not worth it given the amount of gravel on the roads? Any pics of the vehicle?
 
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3,669
Location
St. Charles County, Missouri
Originally Posted by Cressida
Originally Posted by KrisZ
Since you're obviously into the redneck solutions, get a manual pump sprayer and spray the entire underside with used oil. If you do it annually the rust will be kept at bay.
I don't think the redneck comment added anything to the otherwise helpful comment. He said he lives in "one of the poorest regions in an already poor country"
The Joplin of Europe.
 

JHZR2

Staff member
Messages
46,403
Location
New Jersey
Originally Posted by Donald
Bad idea. Spray some oil based rust proofing. Or spray used oil.
+1. Or since oil is so $$$ in the EU, smearing grease, chainsaw bar oil, vegetable oil, etc would help at least a bit. Wouldn't put vegetablle oil where it couldn't be washed though.... could get rancid.
 

Glam_Stachee

Thread starter
Messages
40
Location
Bosnia and Herzegovina
Originally Posted by JC1
To the OP (Original poster) are you going to fix the body work eventually or its not worth it given the amount of gravel on the roads? Any pics of the vehicle?
Originally Posted by tc1446
Do you have access to linseed oil? I once had a motorcycle trailer badly rusted, painted with Linseed oil (takes long time to dry) but several years later the trailer had no rust. It was sitting all that time outside, but never used, so it had no road time on it. What year/type car do you have? Just curious.
1.) Yes I'm going to fix the body work eventually, where I live it's not worth it of course, unless this was just a project car and I'd get another car for daily driving, which is not the case. But I'm hopefully going to be moving to a much warmer climate by next year where rust is not a problem, and I hate winter anyway. 2.) I heard that linseed oil is pretty good, but hard to find where I live, especially in a small rural town. 3.) It's a 1991 Peugeot 309, 1.4 liter carbueratted engine, most basic trim model but I prefer it like that, less electronic crap to go wrong. It was kept by one single owner since then and he was already retired when he bought it in '91, so it was used very little and taken care of, only has 89 000 km on it, interior is basically new, seats aren't torn, steering wheel and pedals aren't worn, and it even smells like a new car. Only issues were a non-opening door, it was stalling when cold even at full choke, the alternator squeaks and need replacing and the blinkers just glow, they don't blink. I fixed the 2 first issues, and the other 2 aren't too important right now. Also there are some dents in the car from parking lot collisions, at least they were repainted in time but with a non-matching color, some minor rust dots and some paint cracking, and the paint is faded on the entire car due to sitting in a yard for the last 2 years since the owner could not renew his license. https://gyazo.com/8ba1d6d58f9c18cd42b5581c422b7a4f https://gyazo.com/aa39bc8863dd0128de242ae5886daf29 https://gyazo.com/244b6d922a2a19080047f4db66b11f29 Those are some pictures from the sale listing, which do make it look a bit nicer than it actually is, I haven't taken any yet since the weather is so crap you can't see anything on the camera.
 
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The car looks to be in great shape, so it's worth the extra effort to protect it. Can you look if plastic wheel well liners are available for this car. That would probably be the best solution to guard from rock damage. Or perhaps modify some other liners to fit your car.
 
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Glam_Stachee

Thread starter
Messages
40
Location
Bosnia and Herzegovina
Originally Posted by KrisZ
The car looks to be in great shape, so it's worth the extra effort to protect it. Can you look if plastic wheel well liners are available for this car. That would probably be the best solution to guard from rock damage. Or perhaps modify some other liners to fit your car.
Yep, first thing I looked into, I was pretty sure the car had them originally and they've been taken off before I checked this one out, but the owner says it's never had any. It does have some strange holes which you could probably stick something into, some of them I'm sure is just for mudflaps but some others I'm not sure about. I imagine maybe the top trim options had them, but so far I've never seen one of these with that, even after talking to a local Peugeot fan club. Also retrofitting another car's liner is pretty much impossible, only option is maybe molding a brand new liner but no mechanic or anyone really has the software and tools for that, except possibly 3D printing it if I can find the original dimensions.
 
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