Did you need Break in oil back in the 60s?

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I think to remember having read somewhere that back in the days there was no such thing as break in oil because the regular oil was good enough for the job. I guess because of the way higher ZDDP content it had back than. So lets say i got a conventional 10w30 oil with high zddp (specifications like back than) would it be possible to use this not only for regular driving but also for break in? Or did i got something wrong here? Dont have an engine to break in at the moment. It just interests me. smile
 
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I don't think most new cars (except honda) get a break in oil I do remember my dad talking about going back to the dealer for an oil change,various adjustments and a head retorque.
 
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Break- in was necessary due to the camshaft with flat non-roller lifters. And yes the oils had more zinc. I don't know how much break-in you need with roller lifter cams. With flat tappets,we used to run them at 2000rpm for 20 minutes or so. That made sure the cam was splash lubricated with zinc rich oil
 

Michael_

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> Break- in was necessary due to the camshaft with flat non-roller lifters. That was what i meant. Can you break in those engines with regular conventional 10w30 with high ZDDP?
 
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Originally Posted by Michael_
> Break- in was necessary due to the camshaft with flat non-roller lifters. That was what i meant. Can you break in those engines with regular conventional 10w30 with high ZDDP?
Yes. Flat tappet cams need to be broken in. 10w30 with a dose of break in lube does the job. It is wise to have timing very close and prime the carb for quick starting and ability to bring up the rpms. I put a window fan in front of the car to help with cooling; a lotta heat is generated during cam break in.
 
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You used to (and probably still do) lube the cam up with this break-in grease that was chock full of zinc and other goodness, which would dissolve into the oil.
 
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Yes, new cars had break in oil back then. I remember my dad having to take his new car back to the dealer at 500 miles to have the break in oil changed to regular oil.
 
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Originally Posted by ka9mnx
Yes, new cars had break in oil back then. I remember my dad having to take his new car back to the dealer at 500 miles to have the break in oil changed to regular oil.
Manufacturers' break-in instructions in owner's manuals back in the day were not as different from today's instructions as people like to imagine. My manual for 1962 Chevrolet recommends the same interval for the first oil change as for subsequent ones. It says "Sound design and precision manufacturing methods will permit you to operate your new Chevrolet in a normal manner from its very first mile without adhering to a formal 'break-in' schedule." It goes on to recommend varying speeds and avoiding hard stops during the first few hundred miles---as is still conventional wisdom today.
 
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Originally Posted by CR94
Originally Posted by ka9mnx
Yes, new cars had break in oil back then. I remember my dad having to take his new car back to the dealer at 500 miles to have the break in oil changed to regular oil.
Manufacturers' break-in instructions in owner's manuals back in the day were not as different from today's instructions as people like to imagine. My manual for 1962 Chevrolet recommends the same interval for the first oil change as for subsequent ones. It says "Sound design and precision manufacturing methods will permit you to operate your new Chevrolet in a normal manner from its very first mile without adhering to a formal 'break-in' schedule." It goes on to recommend varying speeds and avoiding hard stops during the first few hundred miles---as is still conventional wisdom today.
I guess that's the difference between Ford and Chevy?
 
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