Dehumidifier icing up

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JHZR2

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I have a 2006 LG dehumidifier (50pt, IIRC) in my workshop, which is segregated from the rest of the basement (which has a big Santa fe dehumidifier). I've run it with the same settings since then, so I have a lot of history with it. This year, first time ever, it will run for long periods of time, and ultimately build up a ton of ice on the top of the case. It never did anything like this before over the years, and nothing has changed. Ice starts at what looks like a small solenoid before wheree the tubing connects to the forward heat exchanger. It grows in that top corner, not sure where it goes to in the end. Fan blows well over the coils, which are spotless. The filter and all is clean too. Here is the machine with front off and some closer up phone pictures. So again, nothing has changed. Basement isn't cooler than any other year. Compressor does cycle, and humidity does drop slowly. But I can't imagine that ice is good. Currently have it on timer setting so that the ice can melt. But it isn't keeping humidity to where I want it, and tools will surface rust if not lower. Suggestions/ideas? Thanks!
 

JHZR2

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I was thinking that low refrigerant would cause excess cold. Thing was I was under the impression that these things don't leak much (like refrigerators that last for years and years. I don't have the gear to DIY, but I'm all for fixing stuff when I can. Is it worth the time/cost? Will it be practical to find a leak on such a small device? What kind of a service should I call to work on this? Or should I just buy another one? Any good, low-temp, US made units designed for small spaces (don't need a big, $1200 unit like the Santa fe that we have in the house - the space is only maybe 10x25.
 
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I would agree that a new one is cheaper. To offset the cost, pull the coil and sell it for scrap. You might get $30-40 - maybe more. For a little more money, you can separate the copper and aluminum - they generally pay more when you present the metal this way.
 

JHZR2

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There is still refrigerant inside though... And then I need to find a new US made one that isnt way oversized. Wonder if Im better off just running a small AC unit in there on a timer... since I know I can get small US made AC units.
 
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Air conditioners are not good at controlling humidity.An A/C with a source of heat will work,that is what a dehumidifier does.Other wise space is cool but still damp,especially if A/C unit is has to much capacity,I dehumidify my R.V.by running the A/C and an electric heater in the winter time.It is not inexpensive to dehumidify a space.
 
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[censored] that's nothin'. You should see my 220 air conditioner on hot days. I've had over 3" of solid ice on those coils! Had to get rid of it though, it was a PITA to defrost overnight!
 
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Be happy yours lasted as long as it did. I went through 2 LG units exactly like yours - the first died and was replaced under warranty after 1 season, and the second failed two years later in the same fashion as yours. The cost of repairs was about the same as a new unit. I bought a new one that was not an LG, but was still made in China. There were zero options not made in China when I bought mine, at least that could be sourced locally. The replacement unit (can't recall the brand) is now on its third season and works like the day we bought it...
 

JHZR2

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santa fe, which I have in the big part of the basement is US made. My thought about an AC was because I have a freidrich that is US made. Even if it just heated the room, if it condensed water, it would kind of be doing the same thing... hopefully there is a small US made dehumidifier.
 

JHZR2

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Originally Posted By: Al
An amp meter would show low amps. Freezing in the outlet of the orifice points toward low freon.
Are you implying that low freon = low compressor load so lower ampere draw? Or are you saying that low amps means something isnt actually operating? I know for certain that the fan is blowing perfectly across the coils, so it isnt that.
 

Al

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Originally Posted By: JHZR2
Originally Posted By: Al
An amp meter would show low amps. Freezing in the outlet of the orifice points toward low freon.
Are you implying that low freon = low compressor load so lower ampere draw? Or are you saying that low amps means something isnt actually operating? I know for certain that the fan is blowing perfectly across the coils, so it isnt that.
Low amps means low charge (generally). Generally the fan draws little current compared to the compressor. Sorry for not making that clear. These things are ideal for 120V
 
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JHZR2

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OK, thanks. Yeah, I have a kill-a-watt, thing is, I dont have the baseline steady state load from when it was working right (which isnt necessarily the load rating on the sticker on the unit).
 
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