Could small metal particles gotten past my piston rings and damage my crank after cleaning pistons?

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Do like Trav says and clean it best you can. Then maybe try something similar to one of these:



I looked at one of these for my 3500 Ram Cummins 6.7L, but sold the truck before I got to it.

Maybe you can adapt something like this to your particular vehicle.
 
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UFoh

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So these metal particles are microscopic, like when they’re on my finger i can only see them at the right angle. I only used the scotchbright pad a few times and when i did i always cleaned the surface of what I was cleaning. Considering this is a steel block, do you think taking the oil pan off and spraying some brake clean down the oil passages will be enough? Considering the wheel is made out of nylon surely the liquidized material from that can go through the engine without issue(aren’t those chain guides that wear out in the engine made of a similar plastic material?) and I was thinking the tiny metal flakes won’t make it through my oil filter, and considering they’re so small I can’t feel them with my finger hopefully they can’t scratch my bearings between the 10w60 it runs.

I could also pop the pistons out and maybe spray some brake clean on the crank (and then oil) and then put it all back together. That would be significantly easier than trying to get this block out of the car.
 
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What’s funny is y’all seem concerned about the rings, I’m honestly not concerned about the pistons, rather the main/rod bearings

I wouldn't be as concerned about the main/rod bearings. Let's think about how that oil will get there... Oil will be sucked up from the oil pan, through the oil pump, passed through the filter and then into the oil galleries to the mentioned bearings... Seems to me like you will have a bigger issues with piston and rings than with bearings IMO.

just my $0.02
 
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So these metal particles are microscopic, like when they’re on my finger i can only see them at the right angle. I only used the scotchbright pad a few times and when i did i always cleaned the surface of what I was cleaning. Considering this is a steel block, do you think taking the oil pan off and spraying some brake clean down the oil passages will be enough? Considering the wheel is made out of nylon surely the liquidized material from that can go through the engine without issue(aren’t those chain guides that wear out in the engine made of a similar plastic material?) and I was thinking the tiny metal flakes won’t make it through my oil filter, and considering they’re so small I can’t feel them with my finger hopefully they can’t scratch my bearings between the 10w60 it runs.

I could also pop the pistons out and maybe spray some brake clean on the crank (and then oil) and then put it all back together. That would be significantly easier than trying to get this block out of the car.

no way would I spray brake cleaner which will dissolve and disperse the oil. This will lead to a dry start causing more damage. Again read my previous post, pressured oil will pass through the filter before any engine parts except the oil pump which is gear driven and doesn't care anyway.

just my $0.02
 
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no way would I spray brake cleaner which will dissolve and disperse the oil. This will lead to a dry start causing more damage. Again read my previous post, pressured oil will pass through the filter before any engine parts except the oil pump which is gear driven and doesn't care anyway.

just my $0.02
The scotch brite particles are small enough to go through a filter without being trapped.
 
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And people called me OCD for citing the GM training video warning of the dangers of abrasive contaminants getting into the crankcase :unsure:

Aluminum oxide particles will kill an engine before it's time

What was this pad you were using made of?
 

UFoh

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The scotch brite particles are small enough to go through a filter without being trapped.
Every time I happen to use a Scotch-Brite pad I wiped the block down pretty well afterwards, i have a feeling there’s not a lot of scotch bright particles, just metal and nylon shavings
 
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The scotch brite particles are small enough to go through a filter without being trapped.

so if they pass through a filter without being trapped, then by default hasn't the engineering team determined these size particles are not detrimental to the oiling system? I gotta believe if the OP changes the oil and moves on it will be good for the most part...

just my $0.02
 

UFoh

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Astro14

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Every time I happen to use a Scotch-Brite pad I wiped the block down pretty well afterwards, i have a feeling there’s not a lot of scotch bright particles, just metal and nylon shavings
So, how do you think Scotch Brite works?

How does the soft, gentle nylon scratch the steel?

There are abrasives embedded in the nylon. Whether or not you see them, they are there and they did the work.

Pure nylon won’t scratch steel. Scotch Brite does.
 
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mostly used an already dulled harbor freight nylon wheel a la https://www.harborfreight.com/4-in-80-grit-nylon-abrasive-wheel-with-14-in-shank-60325.html

And

Read the product description 80 grit silicon carbide. There are no non abrasive pads that I am aware of, even the Norton 45600 white pad which many sites claim to be non abrasive is not correct, it is but Saint-Gobain does not state what type in their spec sheet.
so if they pass through a filter without being trapped, then by default hasn't the engineering team determined these size particles are not detrimental to the oiling system? I gotta believe if the OP changes the oil and moves on it will be good for the most part...

just my $0.02
Particles less than 2 microns can pass when the engine is operating anything larger cannot, the abrasive particles are small enough to pass through full flow filters which filter down to about 20 micron but they larger than 2 microns.

The Following Is A Summary Of The
Society Of Automotive Engineers (SAE)
Paper Number 881825 Entitled
"Correlating Lube Oil Filtration Efficiencies
With Engine Wear"
Written by David R. Staley of General Motors Corp.
AC Spark Plug and Detroit Diesel Corp. performed a joint study of the relationship between the level of engine oil filtration and Engine wear rates, and found finer filtration reduced the rate of Engine wear.

Diesel and Gasoline Engine wear rates were established by building a Diesel and Gasoline Engine with fully inspected wear components and inspecting them after the test. In both Engines, the upper and lower main bearings, oil rings and compression rings were inspected. In the Diesel Engine, the cam lobe profile and cylinders were also inspected, while the piston pin bushings, piston pins and cylinder liners of the Gasoline engine were inspected.

The total test duration was eight hours. To accelerate wear, 50 grams of AC Fine Test Dust was added, in slurry form, to the crank case every hour.

Diesel Engine wear tests were performed using filters with high efficiency ratings for particle sizes: 40 Microns, 8.5 Microns and 7 Microns.

Gasoline Engines wear tests were performed using filters with high efficiency ratings for particle sizes of the following sizes: 40 Microns, 30 Microns and 15 Microns.

ANALYSIS

The researchers found clearances in the Diesel and Gasoline Engines varied between 2 and 22 Microns during engine operations. That means particles in the 2 to 22 Micron size range are most likely to damage Engine parts. Particles smaller than 2 Microns will slip through the clearances without damaging bearing surfaces.

CONCLUSIONS

The researchers drew the following conclusions:
Abrasive Engine wear can be substantially reduced with an increase in single pass efficiency. Compared to a 40-Micron filter, Gasoline Engine wear was reduced by 50 percent with 30-Micron filtration. Likewise, wear was reduced by 70 percent with 15-Micron filtration. Controlling the abrasive contaminants in the range of 2 to 22 Microns in the lube oil is necessary for controlling Engine wear.
"The Micron rating of a filter as established in a single pass efficiency type test, does an excellent job indicating the filter's ability to remove abrasive particles in the Engine lube oil system."

The smallest particles most popular "full Flow" filters capture with high efficiency are sized 25 to 40 Microns, depending on the filter brand.
 
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