Correct Oil for a "college geared" car

Messages
1,908
Location
Fort Worth, TX
Jeep Cherokee automatic trans is the Aisin-Warner (AW-4) which uses Dexron-Mercon, not ATF+3. Recalling my college days (and a 300-mile drive to and from home a few times per year -- and gas was the equivalent of $3.50 today -- it didn't see much driving when I could walk to where I needed to go), and, in reading through the various threads here (you can pull some posts of mine, as well as UOA's on our 2001 Cherokee), I believe I'd go with Terry Dysons recommendation of a quality OTC oil, and use FUEL POWER and LUBE CONTROL to keep everything squared away. Todays gasoline is really lousy, has a truly short "shelf life", IMO, and FP will keep what's in the tank fresh, as well as keeping the combustion chambers cleaned out. Do a search on Terrys recent comments in re the use of LUBE CONTROL for his take on synthetic versus conventional. Seems a no-brainer to me to follow that. (Member #9). Change the oil every 6000-miles or annually. Use the FORD FL1A/Fram PH8A filters as your cross-reference. (And don't forget to flush and fill the power steering, too.) The Cherokee is an excellent vehicle for prolonged low-maintenance use. Just keep it at or, preferably, under 70 on the Interstate (solid axles and a propensity to easily tump over: slow down if EVER in doubt [as in, can you see over hills and around long corners?]. Also, have you changed out the anti-roll bar bushings to poly or new rubber? Does it have a rear bar? I'd do that before the ignition). And, as the 2WD Cherokee often has soft rear leaf springs -- which wear quickly -- I'd also place those ahead of an add-on ignition. When these vehicles are heavily loaded they WILL steer the vehicle from the rear axle. (Check the steering stabilizer as well.) Safety first. I've covered a lot of miles in my life, not just as professional truck driver. You'll be more than glad (after you change your shorts) that the suspension and steering were up to snuff. Knock on wood, the vehicle is the j-o-b, not the driving. Let it tell you what it is comfortable with: practice some emergency maneuvers on each trip. Avoid the packs of cars (let'em slide by), keep a close eye on your mirrors ( maybe you can avoid a hit, but what about the traffic behind you?); try not to ever drive at night or when weary. Good habits keep one alive and whole. (That is, if rain causes a big change, the habits are out-of-whack already). I've seen far too many college students driving in packs -- sipping a cold one two feet off the next guys bumper -- to know to kick off the cruise for a few minutes to let them get waaaaay ahead. No way I'd ever be able to stop my rig in time if they screwed up. And I AM going home . . . . You'll not ever miss a few minutes of extra time on your trips by the next day. Complacency breeds contempt, and the worst wrecks I've seen on I-10 have been because of the above behaviors, whether a church van with a lousy driver or a worn-down vehicle being driven too fast. Clean the glass perfectly, clean sockets and replace all exterior lamps (yes, they do wear down before failing) that you can be easily see and be seen, and don't forget the TIGER STOP truckstop just east of B-R! Good luck. [ June 12, 2004, 12:24 AM: Message edited by: TheTanSedan ]
 
Messages
1,397
Location
Katy, Texas
I am leaving for college in August! WOO!! I'm going to LSU in Baton Rouge, LA. From where I live, that's about 300 miles. I am taking my trusted 95 Grand Cherokee with the 4.0L engine. I believe that its not going to get much driving when I get there but once a month I may be going back home. What oil should I run? I was thinking: Citgo SynDurance 5w40 (easy to find here in Katy) Chevron Delo 400 15w40 Chevron/Havoline 10w30 or 10w40 I am switching the rear diff. to synthetic (and the front one if I had one [Smile] ) and giving the engine a tune up with an upgrade to a higher output igniton coil. It has fresh tires, shocks and coolant. Tranny is gonna get pan fluid and filter change with a mix of ATF+3 and Lubeguard (black bottle) by recommendation of a trusted fellow Jeeper. Did I miss anything?
 
Messages
36,471
Location
ME
Delo 15w40 sounds great, the extra TBN will help for those 1/2 mile jaunts. There's always finding a better parking space, finding a legal parking space, going three blocks away to the keg distributor, etc etc. [Cheers!]
 
Messages
1,397
Location
Katy, Texas
Tan Sedan, I have a Grand Cherokee. Grand Cherokee are equipped with the Chrysler 42RE transmission (sadly) and have coil springs at all four corners. The shocks I have are really stiff gas filled shocks and are superior in every aspect to the OEM oil filled shocks. They ar KYB Gas-a-justs. The suspension also has poly bushings at front and rear swaybars (greaseable ones) and now that you mention it, the steering stabilizer is old but it's still ok. It's working just as good as the OME SD40 aftermarket stab. that i had in my old Grand Cherokee. Thanks for the advice! I forgot to mention that I am using the FL1A size filters. Oh, the brakes are brand spanking new. Thanks for reminding me about the power steering pump fluid. It looks dirty. Any recommendation on what to change it with? As for driving and drinking, I'm an advocate against it and have personally tried a beer (from my dad) and thought it was nasty. We're pretty much on the same page. I've been getting the same lecture from my parents but the maneuvers, we're on the same sentence. I know when the Jeep says, no more. In reguard to the ignition, there is a guy who specializes in Grand Cherokee acessories and he sells a kit for almost the same price as buying the parts at auto stores and it includes the coil so I'm not gonna complain about a free upgrade. It will help make sure the fuel is completely burned so no fuel enters the oil. Thanks again!
 
Messages
225
Location
Houston
quote:
Originally posted by JeepZJ4.0: As for driving and drinking, I'm an advocate against it and have personally tried a beer (from my dad) and thought it was nasty.
You won't think the Hurricane's on Bourbon Street taste nasty! [Big Grin] Seriously though...good luck in school. The first semester is always the most difficult in terms of staying focused. So many thing going on each night and so many fine women. Keep up with the studies and you'll do fine. [ June 12, 2004, 04:31 PM: Message edited by: biodiesel ]
 
Messages
1,397
Location
Katy, Texas
HAHA, thanks Biodiesel. I've cut a lot of extra-curricular this 1st semester so I can adjust. I'm taking a break from band (i've played Trombone for 7 years) and I am a black belt in Taekwondo. FYI, I went to Citgo's website and they said Citgo's SynDurance is a mix of PAO and GIII so it is probably superior to Rotella T Syn but not as good as D1 or M1 SUV. It's a midrange that can survive I guess. Any thoughts on that? http://www.citgo.com/Products/LubesOils/CITGOBrand/CITGOBrandEngineOil.jsp
 
Messages
3,118
Location
San Antonio, TX
Two motor oils that in my experience have reduced consumption to near zero: Delo 400 - 1990 300zx GTX - 1999 F150 These are good oils for someone who doesn't keep a regular oil change schedule. Sounds like you like to maintain your Jeep though, so I don't think your level will ever get low. The only other thing I can think of is the anti-theft device/system. How is the security where the Jeep will be parked most of the time? Good luck in school!
 
Messages
1,908
Location
Fort Worth, TX
ZJ, thanks for your patience [and grace] with my soapbox bit. My son is about to graduate college, and these things have been on my mind for several years. (Sorry I missed that about the ZJ; old, getting tired and missing stuff . . . It's simply what I've been teaching my son on our drives back and forth from Dallas to Chicago. Plus, having spent way too many years keeping old cars alive [a 1977 Impala wagon I finally sold in '95 at 240k; now a 1971 Chrysler] I've had to make hard choices to keep them reliable. First is tires, then brakes, and suspension/steering tie for third.) A true old time truck-driver said it this way: "Up to 70 mph, you're driving the rig. Past 70 it's driving you". Very pleased you appreciate that difference, and that you know your vehicle has its' own sweet spot. Wish that more did. The rest is just for your enjoyment, FYI: A bit of repayment for the soapbox (and for your folks). Going back to the 1950's studies have shown that people prefer driving 72 mph (corrected). One's vision hasn't yet narrowed to eliminate peripheral engagement, and the speed generally is one which can quickly be backed down from. It has held true for fifty years. As to big trucks, never get stuck next to them in traffic. Watch his steer tire for what the driver is conciously or unconciously doing. He may be fighting a crosswind you're barely aware of (Why you want a good head of steam up to pass, and to pass through his bow wave which you'll meet at about the steer tire. Let the cruise control morons ahead of you get well out of the way before taking your turn. I hold off the port stern while the guy ahead gets around, and if I have a crowd behind me, I try to subtly slow them down so that, once the coast is clear, I can give the Jeep a slight shot of fuel and pass with no one [relatively] ahead or behind me. Enter the passing lane with your signal on (turn it one before you start moving out of your lane and leave on until after you have straightened out in the other. [This is not only the law, it allows plenty of time for the truck driver to interpret your actions]) and pass him, preferably, at least 5 mph more than he is doing. On an upslope is good, on a downslope, don't . . until the road levels out. Best not to return to the right lane until you are 75 yards out ahead of him. (Really). In hilly terrain, watch those mirrors closely. It's damned hard to keep a truck at a good speed, and doubly frustrating (and dangerous) because some moron in a car is either oblivious to the flow pattern, or is just a smug a-hole. Let them get on around you, or jack the speed up for more than two miles before you slow back down. As to the hard-to-shake tailgaters when passing a big truck [herd mentality], I find that a variation in speed and well-timed use of the turn signal will usually keep them in the left lane until I'm actually ready to move back over to the right. Ideally, I've ****** them off enough that they shoot past me (I keep up about the same speed as passing) until we are well clear of the big truck. Conversely, when I'm heading thru a metro area with heavy traffic I usually try to let a local big truck overtake me and I slide in behind him (okay as long as you can see his side mirror); most folks don't want to get behind aslow truck, yet with practice you'll learn to spot the guys who are A] local, and know the best lane for moving along (maybe empty and able to move quickly); or, B] owner-operators who can hustle a shiny KW and reefer thru any traffic. Kind of a stress-reliever. (And you'll be surprised at how often a good driver can leave you in the dust. Slow truck, my *** ). They're pro's . . and being paid for it. Which, believe me, is an entirely different perspective on what is happening on the road. Some company drivers are as good as the other old timers (even better), so keep your eyes on trucks in your rearview that somehow seem to gain position every time traffic moves. (I wouldn't bother to try and signal trucks in and out around you; drivers are wary of 4-wheelers for good reason. Just move over in your lane a little; or, if he's not passing you with much leeway, drop off the cruise rpm so he can get back over pronto.) The economy is pushing these guys way too hard. Keep your eye out for dilapidated rigs and stay away from them. Watch out, too, for the Mexican rigs. A lot of truck driving is culture, and unless the local CB has other Spanish speakers able to help a non-English speaking trucker, I'd give them the leeway. (Although I don't imagine it to be much of a problem, still . . . ) And, more than once I have refused to drive anywhere with folks who haven't a clue of what to do behind the wheel. I drove solo up to Chicago just a little while back in the Cherokee to get the college boy. Stopped every two hours for a break, had to hit the brakes only once in rush hour St Louis traffic . . . and made 700 miles in a little over 9-hours driving time. Never had to make any sudden lane changes, etc. (Health going, so it may be the final ride of that type for this not-quite-old geezer). Experience can make you an excellent driver, but only good habits will keep you (as it has me), accident and moving-violation free for over twenty years. Never used a detector, and learned to use the CB a long while back. I stay out of the way of others, I don't crowd, and I calculate chances based on a helluva lot of factors. Drive as far ahead as you can, never let the vehicle "get ahead" of you. Take good care, and thanks for your patience with me. [ June 13, 2004, 11:19 PM: Message edited by: TheTanSedan ]
 
Messages
1,397
Location
Katy, Texas
Tan sedan, This world needs more people like you, people who look out for other people and giving them advice, even if you don't know them. The soapbox doesn't bother me. I get on one every so often. jorton, Yes, my Jeep is maintained very well. The engine has no sludge and have run synthetic through it for 2 long OCIs to clean out anything that is in it. Delo 400, seems to get the vote. I'll probably have to keep a quart in the Jeep because they probably don't sell it in Louisiana. That Citgo looks tempting though. I might give it a shot before I go to LSU in August. It needs an oil change in 700 miles.
 
Messages
1,397
Location
Katy, Texas
Update, the Jeep has about 79,120 miles right now. I am going to LSU next week to try out for the band and am taking the Jeep. I desided on Delo 400 since it has a good repuation around here. I am using the FL1A size filters in the STP (same as Supertech) varient. The gear oil and tranny has another 3K before it is due but it is going to be changed before I leave for the fall. The fuel filter is overdue but I could be wrong. I have a new air filter sitting in the garage for the trip next week. The tuneup kit will come soon. I also have a new idle air control motor to fix the idle. I will buy a quart of Valvoline Synpower Power Steering fluid to change out the current sump.
 
Messages
1,908
Location
Fort Worth, TX
Don't forget FUEL POWER and LUBE CONTROL!! The former pays me more than enough annually in only fuel cost to cover all oil changes and then some. As to other: make a list of wearing parts (balljoints, tie rods, u-joints; starter, alternator, water pump etc; also ck JEEPSUNLIMITED forum for Grand Cherokee maintenance specifics). Belts, hoses, fasteners, soft fuel lines, brake hoses, etc. In college I just worked my way down the list to replace as funds became available. (I've learned since then: no re-man parts!! Only brand-new!) Personally, I'd nail the battery cables with oversized replacements, replace grounds, and add extra grounds. 80% of the time cars go in shop it is electrically-related. Replace the fuses, breakers, etc and keep old, good ones as spares. I'd imagine the DELO would be fine. The FL1A size is ideal, IMO (the WIX 51515 is my fallback when the BALDWIN B2-HPG is unavailable. Send me an e-mail and I'll send you a link with the details of reliability upgrades on mine (with an emphasis on towing): [email protected]
 
Messages
99
Location
California
Just to let you guys know, only early early '93 Jeep Grand Cherokee's came with the AW-4 tranny which does take DexIII. Late 93 to late 95 Jeep Grand Cherokee's with the 4.0 had the 42RH (Hydraulic actuated), starting '96 they went to the electronic actuated tranny (42RE). All of the 42 series Chrysler trannies take ATF +3. Since his is a 1995, it takes ATF +3. Hope you get this in time before you put DexIII in it.
 
Messages
1,397
Location
Katy, Texas
quote:
Originally posted by TheTanSedan: Don't forget FUEL POWER and LUBE CONTROL!! The former pays me more than enough annually in only fuel cost to cover all oil changes and then some. As to other: make a list of wearing parts (balljoints, tie rods, u-joints; starter, alternator, water pump etc; also ck JEEPSUNLIMITED forum for Grand Cherokee maintenance specifics). Belts, hoses, fasteners, soft fuel lines, brake hoses, etc. In college I just worked my way down the list to replace as funds became available. (I've learned since then: no re-man parts!! Only brand-new!) Personally, I'd nail the battery cables with oversized replacements, replace grounds, and add extra grounds. 80% of the time cars go in shop it is electrically-related. Replace the fuses, breakers, etc and keep old, good ones as spares. I'd imagine the DELO would be fine. The FL1A size is ideal, IMO (the WIX 51515 is my fallback when the BALDWIN B2-HPG is unavailable. Send me an e-mail and I'll send you a link with the details of reliability upgrades on mine (with an emphasis on towing): [email protected]
Wow, we really are on the same page. I am a memeber for JeepsUnlimited. How do you think I found this website? I've been a member since Feb 2002 (yes, this was before I had my licence). The waterpump is new. Thermostat is new. Battery is new. I'll shoot you an email for the list.
 
Messages
1,397
Location
Katy, Texas
quote:
Originally posted by CrazyJeeper: Just to let you guys know, only early early '93 Jeep Grand Cherokee's came with the AW-4 tranny which does take DexIII. Late 93 to late 95 Jeep Grand Cherokee's with the 4.0 had the 42RH (Hydraulic actuated), starting '96 they went to the electronic actuated tranny (42RE). All of the 42 series Chrysler trannies take ATF +3. Since his is a 1995, it takes ATF +3. Hope you get this in time before you put DexIII in it.
Nothing to worry about, I've been using ATF+3 in it. I have a few quarts sitting around. I sent you an email about it. I dunno about the 42RH part. My 94 ZJ had a 42RE and we even replaced the tranny with a 42RE. The only RH models on Grand Cherokees were V8 models. If you got lucky, you had an 46RH. If not, you got a 44RH (or was it 44RE). Most ZJ owners don't like the 42RE since its weak points really shine but the aftermarket kits for it fix the problems. [ June 24, 2004, 04:11 AM: Message edited by: JeepZJ4.0 ]
 
Messages
738
Location
Suburban St. Louis
quote:
Originally posted by JeepZJ4.0: Tranny is gonna get pan fluid and filter change with a mix of ATF+3 and Lubeguard (black bottle)
This isn't supposed to be correct for this application. Check the Lubegard website before you do this. The Lubegard black is a highly-friction-modified additive, intended to allow the use of Dexron 3 in applications that call for a highly-friction-modified fluid. I wouldn't add it to ATF+3. Is it possible the fellow jeeper means the Lubegard red bottle ?
 
Messages
1,397
Location
Katy, Texas
quote:
Originally posted by dkcase:
quote:
Originally posted by JeepZJ4.0: Tranny is gonna get pan fluid and filter change with a mix of ATF+3 and Lubeguard (black bottle)
This isn't supposed to be correct for this application. Check the Lubegard website before you do this. The Lubegard black is a highly-friction-modified additive, intended to allow the use of Dexron 3 in applications that call for a highly-friction-modified fluid. I wouldn't add it to ATF+3. Is it possible the fellow jeeper means the Lubegard red bottle ?

The lubeguard in the black bottle converts Dex III to ATF+3. THe black bottle has the same additives that makes ATF+3 what it is. The fellow Jeeper actually builds trannys for a living. He's sold several trannies and given much advice on JeepsUnlimited and has been correct in all cases. Adding a black bottle will just add to the friction modifiers and with their special additive will help with shifting. He said I could add the black bottle to ATF+3 fluid. I'll ask him again just to make sure. EDIT: I'm emailing him right now. Maybe I was wrong. Thanks dkcase! It wouldn't of been a good thing to make a mistake like that.
 
Messages
227
Location
Louisiana
Man, you guys are wayy overthinking this. Just change the oil with synthetic (M1 or Rotella IMHO) and you will probably be good to go till next summer or christmas break. that is probably all you need to do. Change your axle lube if you wish. I use 85W-140 Royal Purple in my ZJ. ATF + 3 in the tranz Purolator Fuel Filter btw, I have a lifted ZJ w/32s  - [ June 25, 2004, 04:22 PM: Message edited by: OiledMustangGT ]
 
Messages
1,397
Location
Katy, Texas
OK, I am bringing this post back from the dead so thank those who helped me get this Jeep to and from Baton Rouge. TheTanSedan, I am going to start using FP this summer and possibly LC. I am currently using Mobil 1 0w40. OiledMustangGT, I love your ZJ. I am currently 4000 miles into an 7500mile OCI. The Delo 400 was robbing my gas mileage, especially with the Valvoline Synpower Oil Treatment, it was a 50 weight oil!!! The Mobil 1 gave the ZJ's 4.0L some life back. I think by the time the semester is over, I will need to change the oil. When I start working in the summer, I'll start using FP. I might try using LC but with 7.5K mile OCIs on Mobil 1, I don't think I'll need it unless I want to extend that OCI but I'm nervous running it that long. Besides the 4.0L does well with any oil pretty much. TanSedan, all your advice about i-10 driving has come in handy, mainly the advice about semis. They are the lifeline of america but sometimes, they forget we are right next to them. It has saved my tail a few times. Thanks guys!
 
Messages
39,805
Location
Pottstown, PA
Yeah, a 15w-40 will sap your short trip economy. I don't think it will make a spit of difference in your longer trips. My son experienced this with his XJ.
 
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