Conventional or Synthetic for break-in???

Joined
Jun 3, 2012
Messages
1,250
Location
Bremerton, WA
Everyone knows conventionals are more abrasive and wear away the metal like a polishing compound for proper break in. If you use a synthetic you'll be left with too much metal not being removed from the engine.
 
Joined
Aug 25, 2018
Messages
2,977
Location
South Carolina
I think it'd be helpful if you clarified the term "additive response," unless the definition is literal. Thanks.

Additive response refers to how the additive reacts to load, friction, and temperature. Different base oils affect how an additive reacts under different conditions. Other additives also have an impact which is where synergy in formulating comes into play.
 

ZeeOSix

$100 site donor 2022
Joined
Jul 22, 2010
Messages
34,436
Location
PNW
Everyone knows conventionals are more abrasive and wear away the metal like a polishing compound for proper break in. If you use a synthetic you'll be left with too much metal not being removed from the engine.
The piston rings to cylinder lap-in is the most important aspect of break-in. What helps that happen better than anything is how the engine is ran during the break-in period. Running full synthetic oil isn't really going to prevent that from happening. Want lots of cylinder pressure variations and piston speeds ... lots of short bursts to max break-in RPM (and a few little above that RPM once and awhile won't hurt) with some good throttle opening/loads, and lots of closed throttle vacuum events. You want the piston rings to be forced against the cylinder walls to lap them in. I break in all my vehicles with lots of that kind action, I never "baby" them too much during break-in, but I don't go crazy either. I've never had an oil burner in all the new vehicles I've broke-in.

Most motorcycle engines are ran to near redline on the factory dyno to check engine health ... so it's probably half broken in by the time it goes into the shipping crate. Then the owner rides it another 600-1000 miles for more break-in on the factory oil.
 
Last edited:
Joined
Nov 23, 2003
Messages
2,017
Location
WA
Congrats on your new ride. Those new 1050’s are like Hen’s teeth, hard to find. They came out in 2020 and I don’t think they sent any 2021’s over, the 2020 XT were the Marlboro colors and the 2022 is your color. The XT Adventure is the yellow now. it will probably be bullet proof like everything else from Suzuki, tried and true engineering.
 
Joined
Nov 27, 2017
Messages
598
Location
USA
The piston rings to cylinder lap-in is the most important aspect of break-in. What helps that happen better than anything is how the engine is ran during the break-in period. Running full synthetic oil isn't really going to prevent that from happening. Want lots of cylinder pressure variations and piston speeds ... lots of short bursts to max break-in RPM (and a few little above that RPM once and awhile won't hurt) with some good throttle opening/loads, and lots of closed throttle vacuum events. You want the piston rings to be forced against the cylinder walls to lap them in. I break in all my vehicles with lots of that kind action, I never "baby" them too much during break-in, but I don't go crazy either. I've never had an oil burner in all the new vehicles I've broke-in.

Most motorcycle engines are ran to near redline on the factory dyno to check engine health ... so it's probably half broken in by the time it goes into the shipping crate. Then the owner rides it another 600-1000 miles for more break-in on the factory oil.
Most important would be the high cylinder pressure part.
 
Joined
Mar 22, 2006
Messages
2,716
Location
in the shop
Love the Vstrom's! On my new bikes I change out the factory fill at 1k and then run Rotella T4 dino 15w40. I like the break in with a healthy dino HDEO. After another 3-5K, I'll move to a synthetic blend and then full syn at around 10K.
 

flhr

Thread starter
Joined
Oct 23, 2012
Messages
17
Location
SE Asia
Love the Vstrom's! On my new bikes I change out the factory fill at 1k and then run Rotella T4 dino 15w40. I like the break in with a healthy dino HDEO. After another 3-5K, I'll move to a synthetic blend and then full syn at around 10K.
Here in Thailand its 10c (in a freak winter morning) but ussually 26c-36c. In this range the owners manual recommends 10w-40 to 10w50, 15w40 to 15w-50 & 20w-40 to 20w50. T4 would fall in there but unfortunately can't find Rotella here. Thanks.
 
Joined
Aug 11, 2011
Messages
5,423
Location
N.C.
The piston rings to cylinder lap-in is the most important aspect of break-in. What helps that happen better than anything is how the engine is ran during the break-in period. Running full synthetic oil isn't really going to prevent that from happening. Want lots of cylinder pressure variations and piston speeds ... lots of short bursts to max break-in RPM (and a few little above that RPM once and awhile won't hurt) with some good throttle opening/loads, and lots of closed throttle vacuum events. You want the piston rings to be forced against the cylinder walls to lap them in. I break in all my vehicles with lots of that kind action, I never "baby" them too much during break-in, but I don't go crazy either. I've never had an oil burner in all the new vehicles I've broke-in.

Most motorcycle engines are ran to near redline on the factory dyno to check engine health ... so it's probably half broken in by the time it goes into the shipping crate. Then the owner rides it another 600-1000 miles for more break-in on the factory oil.
^^^This x 1,000! (y)🏍️
 

flhr

Thread starter
Joined
Oct 23, 2012
Messages
17
Location
SE Asia
The piston rings to cylinder lap-in is the most important aspect of break-in. What helps that happen better than anything is how the engine is ran during the break-in period. Running full synthetic oil isn't really going to prevent that from happening. Want lots of cylinder pressure variations and piston speeds ... lots of short bursts to max break-in RPM (and a few little above that RPM once and awhile won't hurt) with some good throttle opening/loads, and lots of closed throttle vacuum events. You want the piston rings to be forced against the cylinder walls to lap them in. I break in all my vehicles with lots of that kind action, I never "baby" them too much during break-in, but I don't go crazy either. I've never had an oil burner in all the new vehicles I've broke-in.

Most motorcycle engines are ran to near redline on the factory dyno to check engine health ... so it's probably half broken in by the time it goes into the shipping crate. Then the owner rides it another 600-1000 miles for more break-in on the factory oil.
Pretty much what I do except easy roll ons increasing to 1/2 wot to max break-in rpm & engine break down to 1,700-1,800 rpm. Easy to do with the rolling twisties here. Thank you!
 

flhr

Thread starter
Joined
Oct 23, 2012
Messages
17
Location
SE Asia
Congrats on your new ride. Those new 1050’s are like Hen’s teeth, hard to find. They came out in 2020 and I don’t think they sent any 2021’s over, the 2020 XT were the Marlboro colors and the 2022 is your color. The XT Adventure is the yellow now. it will probably be bullet proof like everything else from Suzuki, tried and true engineering.
Thank you & hope you're wright. Lots of top end engine noise when it warms up. Like my Harley' with cam chain whining to boot, but hear that's normal. Unfortunately it looks like Suzuki is getting out of the motorcycle market.
 

flhr

Thread starter
Joined
Oct 23, 2012
Messages
17
Location
SE Asia
Thank you all for the opinions & science. This wealth of information has been digested & will lead to a knowledgeable decision. Hope it helps others down the road also.
 
Joined
Dec 9, 2011
Messages
1,946
Location
Ca USA
Either conventional or synthetic oil will allow break in if you employ the right method...

I was stationed in Japan years 1979 to 1981 as a member of the USAF
and I witnessed Honda build a motorcycle in 12 minutes and then run at
red line in neutral... I asked about the "break it in gently" in the
owners manual and the replay was the "break it in gently" are written
by their corporate lawyers not by their engineers... if you follow
their engine rebuild steps in their official shop manual there are no
reference to any "break it in gently" warnings...

Your not thrashing your engine... you're doing what your engine requires... The purpose of high
rpms is initial seating of the piston rings to the cylinder walls. The run is conducted at full power
because that is where greatest B.M.E.P. (Brake Mean Effective Pressure) occurs and a high
B.M.E.P. is necessary for good piston ring break-in.

The cylinder walls of a new engine are not mirror smooth as one might imagine. A special hone is
used to put a diamond like pattern of "scratches" over the entire area of the cylinder wall. The
cross hatch treatment of the cylinder walls plays an important role in proper break-in of piston
rings to cylinder walls. I mentioned that B.M.E.P. was necessary to the "break-in" process. Here is
how it works.

full-45634-35021-ringseating1.jpg


How do you know if break is done??? take a compression test... if your
engine shows factory compression then break in is complete... if your
engine shows less than factory compression then more break in is
require... more B.M.E.P. (Brake Mean Effective Pressure)
 
Joined
Feb 4, 2020
Messages
418
Location
MI
Thank you all for the opinions & science. This wealth of information has been digested & will lead to a knowledgeable decision. Hope it helps others down the road also.
Remember... The break-in period is for the whole bike and the rider. The Owner's Manual says to ride the bike easily so that the rider can get a feel for the bike. The brakes are new and need to wear in a bit to become most effective. The tires are new and need to be scrubbed in. The clutch is new and needs to settle in. All these things "break-in" during that first 1000 miles.

Ride safe and enjoy your motorcycle!
 
Joined
Jan 21, 2011
Messages
2,328
Location
California
What about engines that are filled with synthetic from the dealer? Do they never break in properly? I don't know if I buy that anymore.
There are no issues breaking in those engines. In normal operating conditions, synthetic oils don't provide additional wear protection related to oil film thickness or metal-on-metal contact. The benefits to running synthetic oils are better flow/pumpability at very low startup temperatures (e.g. 0w oils are all synthetic), and better resistance to shearing and thermal breakdown. This means that synthetics hold up better during extended service intervals, and synthetic oils can provide better engine protection when temperatures get very high.
 
Top