Combating Shutdown Heatsoak- I finally did something about it

Joined
Apr 9, 2008
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15,188
Location
Central NY
If it is that much an issue I would remove some of the hood seal near the windshield. All the heat really needs is a small crack and will readily convect up out cooling very quickly. The wifes old G8 I removed the plastic fake scoop covers and it cooled down significantly faster. The old 73 Corvette 454 i would lift the hood and put a .5 inch spacer.

I can appreciate the High Tech approach to the problem but a low tech solution would be far superior IMO.

What I've done successfully in the past is spacer the hood hinges.

I got VERY tired of everyone saying the hood would snap off in a head on colission and decapitate me so I had to get rid of the hood hinge spacer.

This vehicle never sees more than 15 MPH unless it's on a trailer --- in which case I'm not in it anyway! Of course I should be VERY worried about a head on collision.
 
Joined
Oct 7, 2021
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Deep South USA ..... west of NOLA
I just realized something easy to overlook. ALL of the cars of the past (before fuel injection) had a cowl vent at the base of the windshield that ran the full width of the hood. Slotted 3-4 inch vent lines ran from fender to fender across the hood. These were there for two things. Fresh cool source of air to the carbs and cooling in general was a benefit while driving and after, Cars of today do not have this anymore. I suppose the builders feel there is no need with fuel injection.
 
Joined
Apr 15, 2010
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6,254
Location
Atlanta,GA
I just realized something easy to overlook. ALL of the cars of the past (before fuel injection) had a cowl vent at the base of the windshield that ran the full width of the hood. Slotted 3-4 inch vent lines ran from fender to fender across the hood. These were there for two things. Fresh cool source of air to the carbs and cooling in general was a benefit while driving and after, Cars of today do not have this anymore. I suppose the builders feel there is no need with fuel injection.
That cowling had nothing to do with insuring air for the carbs and in fact it wasn't connected to the engine bay at all. It was and still is used for providing air to heat/cool the cabin however the air does come from the engine bay.
 
Joined
Apr 15, 2010
Messages
6,254
Location
Atlanta,GA
I've never considered heat soak on any car I've ever owned. I've also never had a car overheat, no engine failures, nothing. Coincidence or proof this is a non-issue?
Generally speaking it's a non-issue. Turbochargers today are typically oil/water cooled and continue to circulate at engine shutdown.

The one potential issue is parts longevity due to the constant heat cycling of plastic components within the engine bay. Automakers striving for max efficiency want their engines to run as warm as possible.
 
Joined
Oct 7, 2021
Messages
331
Location
Deep South USA ..... west of NOLA
That cowling had nothing to do with insuring air for the carbs and in fact it wasn't connected to the engine bay at all. It was and still is used for providing air to heat/cool the cabin however the air does come from the engi
 

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Joined
Oct 7, 2021
Messages
331
Location
Deep South USA ..... west of NOLA
That cowling had nothing to do with insuring air for the carbs and in fact it wasn't connected to the engine bay at all. It was and still is used for providing air to heat/cool the cabin however the air does come from the engine bay.
you are correct. very sorry. I forgot it was only used for inside cabin except for special applications.
 
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