Coffee, chocolate, and contaminents

Joined
Sep 6, 2003
Messages
950
Location
Loveland, Ohio
So I was listening to Terry Gross on NPR interview this professor who was talking about dung beetles and bugs and stuff. He won't use any kind of insecticide because of fear of side effects, and mentions that most others in his field also like most insects except for maybe cockroaches. He will squash spiders because some bite and he has small children at home. As far as ants and stuff, live and let live. He told a story about traveling with an expert in his field one time out west, and how they had to drive far off the interstate to satisfy this guy's caffeine addiction. Seems the guy was very allergic to cockroaches, and he couldn't drink pre-ground due to the amount of insect parts it contained. He would have a reaction. Seems that they have these huge piles of coffee beans where they grind them and there is no way to keep out the roaches. It took him a while to figure out where he was getting exposed to roaches, but when he started drinking freshly ground coffee he had no problem. In those days there weren't Starbucks store all over the place, and they often had to drive for a considerable distance off the expressway to find a place that had good coffee, freshly ground and free of insect parts. He said the same thing is true of chocolate. Some even think allergies to roaches have a role in causing asthma. I don't know how they avoid the roaches in the whole bean product... Food for thought, so to speak.
 
Joined
Jan 20, 2003
Messages
18,449
Location
East of IGO
Before I retired "2000" from fixing forklifts the company I worked for had Guittards Chocolate for an account for many years the plant and warehouse was kept spotless and sanitary. You could eat off of any surface from floor to ceiling no dirt no bugs no animals,absolute top quality. Cleanliness depends upon the quality of acompanys standards.
 
Joined
Jul 11, 2008
Messages
1,478
Location
Iowa
I thought roaches were fast normally. Can you imagine how fast they skitter after feeding in a big pile of coffee beans?
 
Joined
Feb 14, 2008
Messages
2,098
Location
The Rocky Mountains
Here's Apple Butter's... APPLE BUTTER Mold (AOAC 975.51) Average of mold count is 12% or more Rodent filth (AOAC 945.76) Average of 4 or more rodent hairs per 100 grams of apple butter Insects (AOAC 945.76) Average of 5 or more whole or equivalent insects (not counting mites, aphids, thrips, or scale insects) per 100 grams of apple butter DEFECT SOURCE: Mold - post harvest infection. Rodent hair - post harvest and/or processing contamination with animal hair. Whole or equivalent insects - preharvest, and/or post harvest and/or processing insect infestation, SIGNIFICANCE: Aesthetic
 
Joined
Feb 14, 2008
Messages
2,098
Location
The Rocky Mountains
Here's the coffee beans... COFFEE BEANS, GREEN Insect filth and insects (MPM-V1) Average 10% or more by count are insect-infested or insect-damaged Note: If live external infestation is present use the Compliance Policy Guide (CPG) titled "Food Storage and Warehousing-Adulteration-Filth" (CPG 580.100) in accordance with "Interpretation of Insect Filth" (CPG 555.600) Mold (MPM-V1) Average of 10% or more beans by count are moldy
 
Joined
Feb 14, 2008
Messages
2,098
Location
The Rocky Mountains
Here's the beloved chocolate... CHOCOLATE AND CHOCOLATE LIQUOR Insect filth (AOAC 965.38) Average is 60 or more insect fragments per 100 grams when 6 100-gram subsamples are examined OR Any 1 subsample contains 90 or more insect fragments Rodent filth (AOAC 965.38) Average is 1 or more rodent hairs per 100 grams in 6 100-gram subsamples examined OR Any 1 subsample contains 3 or more rodent hairs Shell (AOAC 968.10-970.23) For chocolate liquor, if the shell is in excess of 2% calculated on the basis of alkali-free nibs DEFECT SOURCE: Insect fragments - post harvest and/or processing insect infestation, Rodent hair - post harvest and/or processing contamination with animal hair or excreta, Shell - processing contamination SIGNIFICANCE: Aesthetic
 

jaj

Joined
Aug 21, 2003
Messages
1,060
Location
Vancouver, Canada
I worked with a guy once that had a previous job in the food processing industry. One product they packaged was raisins. Seems a shipment had turned up on the dock with too high a level of bugs in it. The inspectors turned it down, so it was shipped out of the country to another jurisdiction where the tolerances were looser. Well, by the time it got there, the little critters had been busy, so it had too many bugs for them, too. So what did they do? Shipped it back to the first location, mixed it with a clean shipment with almost no contamination, measured the now "lower bug level" which finally met the government standard, and put it into packages and whisked it off to food stores before it started to move on its own.
 
Joined
Feb 14, 2008
Messages
2,098
Location
The Rocky Mountains
Nice...an example of where specification citing only an average value suck!! I've been in food plants and storage facilities where the number of feces on the floor outnumbers the employees! Their answer to insect infestation was to take all the boxes of product and rapidly throw them into a huge freezer to kill the viable bugs and hopefully sort them out later!! All and all everything in moderation I suppose. I still laugh at the fact that the standards in the defect action level handbook haven't been updated since the 70's-even with the advent of new harvesting practices and vastly improved automated inspection technology.
 
Joined
Sep 4, 2006
Messages
5,153
Location
MW
 Originally Posted By: pickled
I still laugh at the fact that the standards in the defect action level handbook haven't been updated since the 70's-even with the advent of new harvesting practices and vastly improved automated inspection technology.
That would stifle the free enterprise.
 

JHZR2

Staff member
Joined
Dec 14, 2002
Messages
46,589
Location
New Jersey
 Originally Posted By: jaj
Seems a shipment had turned up on the dock with too high a level of bugs in it. The inspectors turned it down, so it was shipped out of the country to another jurisdiction where the tolerances were looser. Well, by the time it got there, the little critters had been busy, so it had too many bugs for them, too. So what did they do? Shipped it back to the first location, mixed it with a clean shipment with almost no contamination, measured the now "lower bug level" which finally met the government standard, and put it into packages and whisked it off to food stores before it started to move on its own.
Didn't you get the memo? Dilution is the solution to pollution!
 
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