clock oil

MolaKule

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WHoaa!. I don't think this has ever been asked before. What type of clock, like an old Pendulum clock? 556 oil? I would recommend 25% lighter fluid and 75% Lubeguard Red. (1/4 lighter fluid and 3/4 Lubeguard Red) in a small tightly sealing bottle. This would be one ounce of liquid lighter fluid to 3 ounces of LGR in a 4 to 6 ounce bottle. You need to clean every bearing, pivot and escapement before oiling since old oil attracts dust and gums up the works. I've always wanted to say that. Apply sparingly. Use only one drop for each lubrication point. And don't smoke around this mix.
 
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 Originally Posted By: gonzo
Where can I buy clock oil?Best kind?What's different about clock oil than a 556 type of oil?
Google Otto Frey & Jules Borel and look at their watch and clock oil offerings.
 
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Sewing machine oil is an alternative that might also work. You can apply it with a pin or needle, and should be able to find it either at a fabric store or even walmart in the craft section.
 
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Oops, it's Otto Frei. It's the best professional watchmaker's supply store in the US. They carry all or most Moebius brand oils, which are the industry standard.
 
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 Originally Posted By: moribundman
You are a rebel. Why use the proper fluid when one can use something else?
Can you please explain to me what the properties of "proper" watch fluid are?
 
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 Originally Posted By: Tempest
 Originally Posted By: moribundman
You are a rebel. Why use the proper fluid when one can use something else?
Can you please explain to me what the properties of "proper" watch fluid are?
I already did once. Among the special properties are resistance to aging and degradation, to thickening, to gumming up, to spreading and creeping (no oil must get on the gears, or in case of watch, on the hairspring), to becoming acidic (corrosive) etc. A viscosity of 1.5 stokes at +20°C is required for most watch (not clock) movements, which provides sufficient lubrication to -29°C. Even for clocks there are oils for different operating ranges. Main spring barrels usually need a different viscosity oil than do escapements and pallets. There are anti-sliding lubes for the barrels of automatic watches and dampening greases. Quartz watches require different lube than mechanical watches. Barrel arbors, mini ball bearings, and micro motors require frequently high pressure lube.
 
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Originally Posted By: moribundman
You are a rebel. Why use the proper fluid when one can use something else? LOL
Isn't that the proper way to do things? Only use the proper fluid/tool/part when all else doesn't work. LOL
 
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