Cleanliness and Education

Messages
3,332
Location
Bolivia
Today I was in a brick factory and they showed me into their oil storage shed. In the middle of the dirt parking lot, in the middle of where they dig out the clay for the bricks, in high winds, they have a well ventilated shack with about 25 open drums of oil. One hand pump that they pass between open drums as needed to pump out what they are going to use. Among the oils: SAE 40 CC SAE 40 SF SAE 50 CC SAE 90 GL-3 SAE 140 GL-1 SAE 250 GL-1 ISO 68 hydraulic SAE 85W-140 GL-5(that they bought from me 4 years ago) SAE 80W-90 GL-5 (that they bought from me 4 years ago) (they say they haven't used much of this because it is too thin.) A Venezuelan ATF that didn't say Dexron or Type A or anything, but the 1 qt cans were rusty. With morning temperatures ranging from -2C to 16C, I asked where they were using those oils. The SAE 50 is for their newer gasoline engines, and newer diesel engines. The SAE 40 is for old stuff that they don't need to take care of. The various transmision oils no one could agree on where they were used, but basically said if it was cold they used the 90 and when it got warmer they used the 250. One mechanic said he used the Hydraulic 68 in the converters of the CAT and Komatsu loaders, but the other one insisted that he used the 85W-140 mixed with the 250 to protect it better. They had two greases, niether had EP, one was sodium, the other lithium. No one could agree on where each was used. They also use the greases to thicken the SAE 250 for the summer in diferencials on the pickups and trucks.
 
Messages
9,797
Location
Central Coast, Calif.
they probably have to cut corners on their oil becuase the are busy paying for equipment repairs. [LOL!] It's amazing how much money can be saved by spending money on preventative and conditional maintenance.
 
Messages
13,132
Location
By Detroit
This is probably the most insane of all their practices:
quote:
They also use the greases to thicken the SAE 250 for the summer in diferencials on the pickups and trucks.
Grease mixed into a differential? [Eek!]
 
Messages
9,448
Location
USA
WIndman, You ned to direct them to Dr. AEHass's writeings!!! I would love to see their jaws drop!!! DO not get me wrong I am not and do not agree with those practices!!! It would cost so little to get those drums off the floor, caped with a valve that can be easily turned on or off!!! It would be a good idea to get them out of the dusty,unregulated environment. Sadly I have seen simalar poor quality control in the USA!! Peopel will spend a fortune on drums of Hydralic fluid and then let them get ruined by moisture, dust and dirt!! I figure a lot of plant hydralic issues are due to contamination of the fluid before it ever makes it into the equipment!
 

salesrep

$100 Site Donor
Messages
3,630
Location
lllinois
johnbrowning
quote:
It would cost so little to get those drums off the floor, caped with a valve that can be easily turned on or off!!! It would be a good idea to get them out of the dusty,unregulated environment. Sadly I have seen simalar poor quality control in the USA!! Peopel will spend a fortune on drums of Hydralic fluid and then let them get ruined by moisture, dust and dirt!! I figure a lot of plant hydralic issues are due to contamination of the fluid before it ever makes it into the equipment!
See it all the time just makes you shake your head. Then they'll quibble over a few bucks on cost. [I dont know] [Duh!]
 
Messages
8,711
Location
Nothern USA
You can buy a cheap ball valve for about what a cheap gate valve costs. A cheap ball valve is easier to use and leaks less than a good gate valve. Drumb stands are reasonable too, or use a pile of bricks.
 
Messages
9,448
Location
USA
My father inlaw keeps his drums of oil and hydralic fluid on wooden stands up high. They all have nice ball valve setups!! I was so proud when I went in the tool shed to process a deer and say this!!! You would be hard pressed to ask more!!! The Hazmat labels can be read easily etc.... THis is on his farm wich is a family business with no hired help!!
 

Al

Messages
19,251
Location
Elizabethtown, Pa
Unfortunately there is frequently no "Cause and Effect." Equipment keeps breaking down - at the same rate that it always did (with dirty oil). Dirt in the lubricant is usually acknowledged as the #1 killer of bearings. I have heard that in the past that dirty grease costs $5000 per pound. The point is that U save a couple of bucks per greasegun tube vs buying it in bulk. Bearing manufactures will be happy to send you all of the free grease (in 55 gal drums you want) I fought this battle for years and years at our Facility. Fortunately when we developed maintenance training programs things got turned around. In part bc I became the maintenance instructor [Big Grin] They need a culture change...Driven by realization that this practice is costing them big money. There are training aids out there and lube and bearing companies can provied some of these materials for free.
 

widman

Thread starter
Messages
3,332
Location
Bolivia
We give classes, present at conventions, I maintain two websites to try to educate them, send out monthly information buletins (spanish) on some topic or another (had one on cultural change). But as the saying goes, you can lead a horse to water, but you can't make him drink. 50% of the oil market in the higher altitudes of the country, where the morning temperatures are below freezing every morning of the year is SAE 40. I constantly find mixtures of different oils in UOA, once finding as much as 30% motor oil mixed with an Ammonia Compressor Oil.
 
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