Ceramic coatings and less engine wear?

Ok, here is another one. Was talking to a guy that does coating work for some of the Winston cup teams and he told me that he had coated his daily driver with the same coatings. He puts ceramic on pistons and a dry-film lubricant on other parts, an oil shedding coating on the bottom of the intake and some type of heat ejecting coating on other parts. So anyone have any knowledge on how this would work for a street driven machine? Do the coatings hold up well? Again,like cryogenics should be low wear and if cryogenics and coatings are combined a way to make a street engine last forever? Any racers have any UOA's to post?
 
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quote:
...and why have an engine that's still running strong after many hundreds of thousands of miles when the rest of the car is falling-apart junk?
The same question might be asked of a person who buys a diesel engine vehicle, no ?????
 
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To answer the good engine, but car looks like junk string? Or take outrun's method of car maintenence, Car is 5years old but is showroom new in appearence. Why? Outrun cares to spend top dollar to promptly eradicate any blemish and seek the best parts and prememptive maintenence to keep it nicer than the average car abusing cheap-skate Joe-
 
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quote:
Originally posted by V6 Diesel: He puts ceramic on pistons and a dry-film lubricant on other parts, an oil shedding coating on the bottom of the intake and some type of heat ejecting coating on other parts. So anyone have any knowledge on how this would work for a street driven machine? Do the coatings hold up well?
I don't know about internal parts, but jet hot ceramic coatings are often used for headers and they work quite well. They hold up to extreme heat without flaking or peeling, they protect the metal from corrosion, and they keep the parts looking brand new for years. P.S. In the case of headers, another benefit is that the insulating effect of the coating helps keep the engine bay cooler and the exhaust hotter. [ October 19, 2003, 11:05 PM: Message edited by: MRC01 ]
 
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quote:
Originally posted by V6 Diesel: Again,like cryogenics should be low wear and if cryogenics and coatings are combined a way to make a street engine last forever?
No.
 
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quote:
Originally posted by badnews: The same question might be asked of a person who buys a diesel engine vehicle, no ?????
Fuel savings are probably the greatest factor here.
 
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Hi, ceramic components have been used in high load areas for nearly two decades Silicon Nitride cam follower rollers are a typical key component. These allow very high injection pressures and maintain durability The only failure I have seen is where the roller's shaft has been flawed at production Regards
 

Patman

Staff member
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quote:
Originally posted by Starbreaker666: Does outrun normaly speka about him self in the 3rd person?
Patman was noticing the same thing. [Smile]
 
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quote:
Originally posted by Patman:
quote:
Originally posted by Starbreaker666: Does outrun normaly speka about him self in the 3rd person?
Patman was noticing the same thing. [Smile]

bwahahaha [LOL!]
 
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Not only ceramic coatings ..but powder coatings on the piston tops and the combustion chambers. The dispation of heat through the piston is LOST HP. The powder coatings help retain that heat. It's not a common process for the "street" engine. We have ceramic coated shafts on our Crane-Cochrane condesate pumps (ever heard of a steam pump? Closest thing to it.). The shafts wear mainly due to the packing that seals the shaft/face plate. The ceramic coated shafts reduced our down time to nearly zero due to packing failure. I would imagine that the process is just too expensive to impliment in mass production vehicles. I am however, under the opinion that you CAN make an engine last a life time ..and that's forever in my lexicon.
 

Kestas

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Kestas helps Roush Racing on some development work they have going on. These exotic treatments are generally geared to reduce internal engine friction. The mantra of the drivers is that there is no such thing as too much power. Keep in mind these NASCAR racing types spend gobs of money stretching technology within the NASCAR rules to gain tiny fractions of horsepower. This includes cryotreatments. A lot of cryotreating is a bunch of hoo-haa. Most people don't know what they're doing. Some of it is to simply stress relieve parts that will subsequently be machined to tight tolerances. Other times it is used to maximize heat treatment effectiveness on hardened steel. Unless you know WHAT you're doing with cryotreatment, and WHY you're doing it, you're just wasting a lot of liquid nitrogen. [ October 20, 2003, 01:20 PM: Message edited by: Kestas ]
 
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