Can I use a Multiweight oil in my tractor?

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4
Location
PA
I have a Craftsman YS 4500 yard tractor with about 150 hours on it. I have been changing the oil with the recommended SAE 30 oil, but it is not real easy to find. The book recommends the SAE 30 for above 40 degrees and 5w-30 for below 40. My questions is can I run a 5w-30 (possibly synthetic) in it year around without hurting it? I change the oil about 1 time a year currently and I use a purolater classic "car" filter if it matters and the engine is a B&S Intek Gold 20HP.
 
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25,974
Location
Upstate NY
HD or Lowes or NAPA has straight 30 weight oil. Its pretty easy to find. TSC also. I use multiweight oil in my OPE, but I get the Amsoil 4 stroke oil.
 
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9,120
Location
Illinois
For straight 30 weight oil, it will be found easiest at any place that farmers go to buy stuff... farm supply stores.
 
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5,069
Location
Saratoga, NY
Yes, the straight weight is a bit of an outdated spec. They spec it for shear stability ... although you can get similar durability from XW-30 synthetics ... and even some conventional oils. Try a 0W-30 or 5W-30 synthetic ... or 10W-30 HDEO or "high Mileage" oil and check the level frequently for consumption.
 
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2,935
Location
Canada
Use any oil within the recommended viscosity range. These OPE engines can run for decades with minimal attention to the oil. Changing your oil within the manual's specifications or once a year is all that really matters. What you choose to use is of minor importance provided the oil is within specified requirement. I run two riding mowers. One with a Kawasaki engine the other a Honda. I've run 30, 10W30, 15W40 and recently 10W40 Formula Shell that I bought for $1.69 per liter. Engines run well and last long with any decent off the shelf oil. They don't have fussy pallets. Change the oil. That's what matters.
 
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1,612
Location
Ohio
Originally Posted By: Bror Jace
Yes, the straight weight is a bit of an outdated spec. They spec it for shear stability ... although you can get similar durability from XW-30 synthetics ... and even some conventional oils. Try a 0W-30 or 5W-30 synthetic ... or 10W-30 HDEO or "high Mileage" oil and check the level frequently for consumption.
+1
 

KJK200

Thread starter
Messages
4
Location
PA
Originally Posted By: boraticus
Use any oil within the recommended viscosity range. These OPE engines can run for decades with minimal attention to the oil. Changing your oil within the manual's specifications or once a year is all that really matters. What you choose to use is of minor importance provided the oil is within specified requirement. Engines run well and last long with any decent off the shelf oil. They don't have fussy pallets. Change the oil. That's what matters.
Does this go for snow blowers and push lawn mowers as well? If so, I am going to try the Walmart SuperTech 5w-30 synthetic oil in all of them. And then I will change all of them at least once a year since it will be so easy.
 
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10,783
Location
Jupiter, Florida
One issue with modern 5W-30 oils is the lack of ZDDP. Modern cars are designed around this. Your engine is. While any oil will work, the 30 is better capable of tappet protection than 5-30.
 
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2,935
Location
Canada
Originally Posted By: KJK200
Originally Posted By: boraticus
Use any oil within the recommended viscosity range. These OPE engines can run for decades with minimal attention to the oil. Changing your oil within the manual's specifications or once a year is all that really matters. What you choose to use is of minor importance provided the oil is within specified requirement. Engines run well and last long with any decent off the shelf oil. They don't have fussy pallets. Change the oil. That's what matters.
Does this go for snow blowers and push lawn mowers as well? If so, I am going to try the Walmart SuperTech 5w-30 synthetic oil in all of them. And then I will change all of them at least once a year since it will be so easy.
OPE engines are all pretty much the same regardless of what they're used on. With even marginal maintenance, they'll often outlast the equipment they're mounted on. I can't recall the last time I heard of an OPE engine that met an early demise due to the brand of oil or viscosity used in it. I've worked on one lawn mower engine that was over fifteen years old that probably had the original oil in it. When I drained the oil, a mere couple oz. of black liquid grease poured out. Nonetheless, the engine still ran fairly well despite the fact that it produced a ridiculous amount of blue smoke on start up and a fairly good cloud during operation.
 
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3,496
Location
VA
Originally Posted By: Cujet
One issue with modern 5W-30 oils is the lack of ZDDP.
Can you name a oil that has actually eliminated ZDDP??? With the weenie springs on a small OPE engine, it probablt wouldn't care if there isn't any... If it's a concern use one of the HDEOs(what I have in my backup generator and OHC Honda mower) or something like Mobil-1 0W-40...
 
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1,777
Location
Pennsylvania
Originally Posted By: Cujet
One issue with modern 5W-30 oils is the lack of ZDDP. Modern cars are designed around this. Your engine is. While any oil will work, the 30 is better capable of tappet protection than 5-30.
This is one argument I don't buy. Small engines have so little valve spring pressure I don't feel the lower ZDDP is an issue.
 
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720
Location
Delaware
I have run a 15W-40 in my Craftsman lawn tractor with a B&S Intek single for the 3 years I've had it. Uses virtually no oil during the season, great on gas, and plenty of power. Another poster observed that these engines are not fussy about oil. The only reason I use HDEO is that I reason that if a diesel can't break the oil, no OPE engine can.
 
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6,494
Location
Connecticut
Originally Posted By: Slick17601
Originally Posted By: Cujet
One issue with modern 5W-30 oils is the lack of ZDDP. Modern cars are designed around this. Your engine is. While any oil will work, the 30 is better capable of tappet protection than 5-30.
This is one argument I don't buy. Small engines have so little valve spring pressure I don't feel the lower ZDDP is an issue.
+1 it does not matter. The only thing ZDDP will make a difference for is an engine with an aggressive cam and high spring pressures. With cheaply built power equipment these days, the rest of the machine will fall apart before the engine wears out.
 
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25,974
Location
Upstate NY
A couple of things to keep in mind about the smaller OPE engines is that they do not have a filter, and could run very hot if grass clippings or mouse nests clogged the cooling fins. And of course there is no temp gauge or idiot light to let you know. Given one uses so little, I go for the Amsoil 4 stroke oil. Its one of the best for small engines and will handle extreme heat should that happen. I also have Billy the cat to somewhat deal with the mice.
 
Messages
171
Location
VA
Originally Posted By: Donald
A couple of things to keep in mind about the smaller OPE engines is that they do not have a filter, and could run very hot if grass clippings or mouse nests clogged the cooling fins. And of course there is no temp gauge or idiot light to let you know. Given one uses so little, I go for the Amsoil 4 stroke oil. Its one of the best for small engines and will handle extreme heat should that happen.
+1
 
Messages
54
Location
Illinois, USA
I have run 10/30 in all my tractors as long as it has been available.Whether air cooled gas or liquid diesel. I change seasonally and have tractors that are 30 years old.
 
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2,935
Location
Canada
Originally Posted By: Maximus1966
Originally Posted By: boraticus
Engines...don't have fussy pallets...
Fussy wooden skids??
Excuse my error. Palate. Tough crowd...
 
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