Bypass for tractor? fuel filter as bypass filter?

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I am overhauling the engine on my Allis Chalmers 7000 (301 cu. in. turbo diesel), and was wondering if this tractor would be a good candidate for a bypass filter. It gets around 200 hours a year on it, maybe a hair more. The standard OCI per the 1979 manual is 100 hours. This engine runs pretty dirty (soot in the oil). I am looking for keeping the oil cleaner and maybe keeping oil changes to once a year with either Rotella 5w40 or 15w40 Dello 400 (the reason for thinking about 5w40 is because this tractor sees a lot of short operations in the winter picking up muck, about 1 hour a day in cold weather). The second question is what do you all think of a filter set up like this: http://rides.webshots.com/photo/1321809629011294358iimFIQ I am wondering if this would make a decent bypass, especially for soot clean up. I am thinking it would work pretty well since fuel filters are generally cellulose, which is what you need to "soak up" the soot. Hurst
 

Hurst89

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One other thing. What about spinner II filters and how much $$$ are those things? And can they be found used?
 
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That looks like someones bypass set-up on a Powerstroke. We have some old tractors on our farm too that seem to have incredibly short oil change intervals. I think that is mostly because the quality of engine oil then was not nearly as good as it is today. I'm guessing a spinner filter would cost a lot more than something you could make up with a simple spin-on filter. Spin-on filters are a lot easier to change too. We used to have an old AC 7010 and an AC 7050 and I think the 7050 came from the factory with a bypass filter already integrated into it. It was right in front of the cab, just under the sheet metal directly below the windshield.
 

Hurst89

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Yeah, I'd think the spinner might be a bit of overkill. If I could find a good used one for about $80-90 I would think about it. I was also looking at Frantz, but those still go for a premium used. I also have a friend who has a Dad that works at a CAT dealer, so I can get stuff at his employee pricing if I give him the part I need. Are there any other inexpensive spin on options that are in the 1-5 micron range? I can't make myself pay for the Amsoil name... Hurst
 
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Well, Amsoil is no more expensive than any of the other offerings ..but there are plenty of options. In spin-on filters, Amsoil is about the best over the duration of usage. Most bypass filters are lower in efficiency (higher in micron rating). You can't trump the filtration triangle without expensive medias. Are you dead set on a spin-on? If you want to go to a canister, you can save some money on replacement media without the hassle of tp/pt types. You probably don't have the space/size limitations that most have. You can get either a short or a long canister and use either 2x10 or up to 3.5x20" cotton wound filters ..and spec any micron rating you please. They should last you your 200 hours, but might add a gallon or two to your sump. A fellow member, Schultz from PALL, helped me through the process, with another member, Filter Guy, giving me the lead to the filter manufacturer. I have a larger PALL unit that I salvaged. There are outfits that will make any custom sized filter for your needs ..without too much cost. I bought a case of 3.5"X20 cotton wound with SS core for something like $60 delivered. I think I got them in 1um .. The difference between it and any other order the outfit handles was that my case only came with 8 filters in it, while 2" filters would have been quite a few more.
 
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The Fleetguard LF777 bypass filter is rated at 95% of 5 micron particles. I don't know what other manufacturer's versions are rated at. You could probably get a filter with the filter head and stay within your price range. Some 3/8" tubing and fittings for it would be a little extra but probably not more than $20-$30. Monitor your oil pressure before and after and if it drops more than you want it too just put a small flow control valve on the return side to adjust the pressure drop.
 

Hurst89

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I'm not set on anything right now. Still looking at options. The reason I said I can't bring myself to pay for the Amsoil name is because I would like to find an inexpensive used one. You are right in that Amsoil is no more expensive than anyone else new, but I am hoping to make my own kit with universal parts or to find a good used unit. This tractor already has a 4 gallon sump... yeah, 4 gallons for 4.9 Liters lol. It also has dual full flow filters. Allis didn't skimp on engine lubrication, but with such a large sump, 100 hours comes a little more often than I like. I liked the idea of th fuel filter because those things are readily available and I can find them for less than 10 bucks a pop, but wasn't sure if they would be acceptable for hot engine oil and if they would be able to catch a respectable amount of soot. I'm looking into these PALL filters as I type... Hurst
 

Hurst89

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Still looking around, and it looks like the centrifuge oil filters are the way to go on a diesel as far as cost and stuff. Never have to buy another filter again. Anyone know where I can get a Spinner II model 25 or the equivilant used? Or anyone deal these on here? Hurst
 
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Look at McMaster-Carr for the canisters if you're considering the cotton wound filters. I'm sending you a PM about something I found that may interest you. I'm not selling it ..but I'm tempted to buy it.
 

Hurst89

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The first engine made it to 5900 hours, but I bought the tractor at 5200 with a flaky ground on the hour meter, so I am not sure if those hours are close. This engine should be able to make it to 8-10,000+ hours if taken care of. I was down to just copper on the upper rod bearing shells and the pistons had made pretty good ridges in the sleeves and there was a lot of gunk in the valve cover and oil pan (maybe just from the antifreeze in the oil), so I want to do everything I can to make my overhaul investment the longest lived investment I can. Hurst
 

Hurst89

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One more thing, I looked in the service manual for my tractor, and the oil pump is rated for 3 gpm at low idle, 14 gpm at rated speed (2200 rpms). That should be plenty of flow for a 55-60 gph centrifugle filter, but the pressure regulator is set to about 45 psi. Is this enough to effectively run a centrifugale filter? Hurst
 
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I've seen some centrifuge filters that are spun with compressed air and I've seen others with filter elements spun by oil jets. If you're using compressed air it probably wouldn't matter but if it uses oil pressure, it probably will. During your engine overhaul, are you planning to inspect or replace the oil pump? If the rest of the engine showed such high signs of wear, it might not be pumping as well as it was originally designed for. You should also get your injection pump and injectors checked out. I've seen several diesel engines with sooty engine oil from poor fuel injection.
 
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200 hours a year divided by 8,000 is 40. Years? in 40 years will you even care how the tractor runs? I am wondering if the worry about the Bypass filter is worth it?
 

Hurst89

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Yeah, I don't plan on selling the tractor for a while. My hope is that even when I get a job in the city somewhere, that I will haul the tractor to my new home. Hope the neighbors won't mind... haha. But in reality, a lot of it has to do with the oil changes and the fact this tractor runs short intervals in the winter, leaving a lot of soot build up in the oil. Hurst
 
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Centrifugal oil cleaners were standard fitting on a lot of Belarus tractors. I scrounged mine off a unit bound for the shredder. Wish I could have saved the whole tractor, but no space.
 
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