Bugs in oil ??

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Given that microbes and things grow in all sorts of uninhabitable places, such as 120C sulfur springs beneath the ocean, fuel oil tanks and dodgy chinese resteraunts..... Has there been any testing/analysis for microbial growth in crankcase oils ? Does this affect shelf life ? Given the biodegradability of synthetics, are they more prone to attack than dino ?
 

Al

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Correct me if I am wrong-but I have not heard that synthetics are more biodegradable than dino oils. I am basing that on the fact that they break down less under heat. I would imagine that biodegradablity and microbial groth are two different kettles of fish. [I dont know] But its an interesting question-just don't know [Confused] [ August 17, 2003, 06:14 AM: Message edited by: Al ]
 
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I suppose that it is possible, but I don't know if microbes could survive the heat changes of motor oil in an engine. But then again, fungi can grow in water in a radiator, so who knows. [I dont know]
 

Shannow

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quote:
Originally posted by Al: Correct me if I am wrong-but I have not heard that synthetics are more biodegradable than dino oils. I am basing that on the fact that they break down less under heat. I would imagine that biodegradablity and microbial groth are two different kettles of fish. [I dont know] But its an interesting question-just don't know [Confused]
Al, I read the articles on the site posted by demokritos http://theoildrop.server101.com/ubb/ultimatebb.php?ubb=get_topic;f=4;t=000204 When I got to this section :
quote:
Biodegradability: While stable against oxidative and thermal breakdown, the ester linkage provides a vulnerable site for microbes to begin their work of biodegrading the ester molecule. This translates into very high biodegradability rates for ester lubricants and allows more environmentally friendly products to be formulated.
I started thinking. Would that imply that a rarely driven car in storage would be better off with dino ?
 
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If there's water present beneath the oil, such as a very large storage tank or the tank of a large dry sump, it's been known for microbes to grow on the oil-water interface. This is much the same thing as the bugs that can contaminate diesel fuel. These critters are acidic and cause serious damage. I'm not aware of a biocide that can be used in oil sumps and preserve the lubricating ability of the oil. A biocide does work well in fuel. The only cure I've heard of is to clean the oil system with steam that'll kill the bugs with heat, although there may be biocides that work and I've not heard about them. The main preventive is to keep water from accumulating in the bottom, either with centrifuging or coalescing filters. Ken [ August 17, 2003, 05:19 PM: Message edited by: Ken2 ]
 

Al

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quote:
Originally posted by palmerwmd: Should be a non issue in cars that see any use. Fred.. [Smile]
I think he was talking more about new oils in the container. He did mention shelf life.
 
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