Brand New 2015 F350 Diesel

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Wow this thread took a left turn, but since its heading this way I'll add my 2 cents. The crazy 15,000 mi. service interval only pertains to Dodge/Ram trucks as I have been driving Fords for quite a while and the only remark in the owners manual for servicing the rear end is if it has been submersed in water. On another forum I frequent a retired Ford engineer stated that they regularly saw 304f on their testing at Eisenhower pass and went on to say don't worry about it. For a short time Ford Super Duty were coming factory equipped with an aluminum rear diff cover ('08-'11) and it was decided that it was more bling than function as overheating a rear end isn't possible per their own engineers.
 
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Originally Posted By: roadrunner1
Wow this thread took a left turn, but since its heading this way I'll add my 2 cents. The crazy 15,000 mi. service interval only pertains to Dodge/Ram trucks as I have been driving Fords for quite a while and the only remark in the owners manual for servicing the rear end is if it has been submersed in water. On another forum I frequent a retired Ford engineer stated that they regularly saw 304f on their testing at Eisenhower pass and went on to say don't worry about it. For a short time Ford Super Duty were coming factory equipped with an aluminum rear diff cover ('08-'11) and it was decided that it was more bling than function as overheating a rear end isn't possible per their own engineers.
This is incorrect. Ford recommends changing the rear axle fluid on their Dana's at 50k miles. The severe service schedule is exponentially shorter than that. The lifetime fill pertains to passenger vehicles and excludes any vehicles that tow. And for the record the 15k mile interval on the Ram I quoted is for the engine oil, not the diff.
 
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Originally Posted By: jrmason
This is incorrect. Ford recommends changing the rear axle fluid on their Dana's at 50k miles. The severe service schedule is exponentially shorter than that
Per the maintenance schedule: 105,000 miles - Normal drain interval (this includes the Dana M80) 50,000 miles - Operation in dusty/sand/off-road environment (however, this shortened interval only applies to the F-450/F-550) Furthermore, for the Dana S110 & S130 equipped F-450/F-550: "Change rear axle fluid every 100,000 miles under normal driving conditions on all commercial applications. When operating your vehicle at or near maximum gross vehicle weights, change the rear axle fluid every 50,000 miles. In addition, follow this 50,000-mile schedule when operating your vehicle under the special operating conditions, where noted." The only interval shorter than that is as follows: "During long periods of trailer towing with outside temperatures above 70°F and at wide-open throttle for long periods above 45 mph, change non-synthetic rear axle fluid every 3,000 miles or three months, whichever comes first. This interval can be waived if the axle is filled with 75W-140 synthetic gear fluid meeting Ford specification WSL-M2C192-A, part number F1TZ-19580-B, or equivalent."
 
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Originally Posted By: Ramblejam
[quote=jrmason]This is incorrect. Ford recommends changing the rear axle fluid on their Dana's at 50k miles. The severe service schedule is exponentially shorter than that
Nope. Per the maintenance schedule: 105,000 miles - Normal drain interval (this includes the Dana M80 F-350, and Dana S110 & S130 F-450/F-550) 50,000 miles - Operation in dusty/sand/off-road environment (however, this shortened interval only applies to the F-450/F-550) Furthermore, for the S110 & S130 equipped F-450/F-550: "Change rear axle fluid every 100,000 miles under normal driving conditions on all commercial applications. When operating your vehicle at or near maximum gross vehicle weights, change the rear axle fluid every 50,000 miles. In addition, follow this 50,000-mile schedule when operating your vehicle under the special operating conditions, where noted. The only interval shorter than that is as follows: "During long periods of trailer towing with outside temperatures above 70°F and at wide-open throttle for long periods above 45 mph , change non-synthetic rear axle fluid every 3000 miles or three months, whichever comes first. This interval can be waived if the axle is filled with 75W-140 synthetic gear fluid meeting Ford specification WSL-M2C192-A, part number F1TZ-19580-B, or equivalrecommendation. You beat me to correcting myself. I got to thinking about it and went to my Factory FSM and you are correct so my apologies on posting the wrong information. My FSM also covers the F450/550,but I honestly thought it was the same across the board for the Dana's. That's what I get for assuming. Isuppose it all depends on how you drive your truck and how you use it, but I personally never go more than 30-40k miles between intervals. Both my trucks are used for towing close to max GVW for at least 75% of their miles so it is cheap insurance to change it out. I also own 2 Fords and could not disagree more with their lifetime fill recommendation on their passenger vehicles. Lifetime simply means the lifetime of the component whether that's 350k miles (highly unlikely) or 10 miles past warranty. Its poor marketing on their end.
 
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What is the current service interval for the Ram 2500/3500? We still have an '03 & '06 Dodge and per owners manual its a 15,000 mi. interval for the rear end. My Fords have all been Sterling rear ends, not Dana. The only Dana used on the Super Dutys are the duallys in the rear. According to all of my diesel supplements the Dana is the only one with a required service interval. With that being said I usually change it once at 100,000 mi. as I usually keep them 200,000 +mi. I haven't changed the engine oil yet in my '15, but I intend to use the Deere Plus 50 II 10w-30 per IOLM. I ran the same in my '07 6.0 for approx. 140,000 mi. and this truck will be in the same service, loaded with up to 4,000 lbs. in the bed running 70 mph 150 mi. down the interstate throughout the summer and occasional trailer towing.
 
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The 3rd gen trucks owners manual says that they do not have a recommended interval change for Schedule A. Under Schedule B, it says to change it every 15,000 miles. So its really up to the user and dependent on driving conditions and loads. If using a good quality synthetic 15k is wasteful in my book unless your truck sees overloaded conditions or very slow avg speeds under high load. Ive pulled samples on both my Dana 80 and my AAM 11.5 @40k and Blackstone recommended I go another 5k and retest based on wear metals and additives but that is as far as I have pushed it. I feel it is a safe zone for my uses. Also, GM uses the AAM 11.5 in their HD pickups and while I can't quote their recommended intervals I know they are a good bit more than Rams. I believe GM also specs 75/140, so apparently oil has as much to do with the service intervals as driving style. We have really wandered from the OPs original questions and I apologize for that. We should have opened another thread for this discussion.
 

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I'm learning such a lot form you guys! thanks! Sorry to get the conversation back to the dumb question level. But I'm totally new the the world of Diesels!.. I just passed 100 miles in my F350 :-) Question: when traveling and when not convenient to change my own oil then I may have to use an oil change shop. Any recommendations for places are knowledagble on Diesels? I live in San Diego and most of my traveling will be in hot climates. I can't see myself EVER going to a place tat even approaches freezing point. With that said, I called around a few oil changes shops in San Diego and none of then stick 10w30 diesel oil!.. it looks like 5w40 is the norm. I'm nervous because Ford recommend 10w30. Any comments on this?
 
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Just use your local dealer or when on the road locate another Ford dealer. Enjoy the new ride!!!!!!!!!!
 
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Originally Posted By: smcrea
I'm learning such a lot form you guys! thanks! Sorry to get the conversation back to the dumb question level. But I'm totally new the the world of Diesels!.. I just passed 100 miles in my F350 :-) Question: when traveling and when not convenient to change my own oil then I may have to use an oil change shop. Any recommendations for places are knowledagble on Diesels? I live in San Diego and most of my traveling will be in hot climates. I can't see myself EVER going to a place tat even approaches freezing point. With that said, I called around a few oil changes shops in San Diego and none of then stick 10w30 diesel oil!.. it looks like 5w40 is the norm. I'm nervous because Ford recommend 10w30. Any comments on this?
10w-30 can be conventional. 5w-40 has to be a synthetic. Change your own oil or take it to ford.
 
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There must be enough space in an F350 to fit a drain pain, filter, and a couple of galln jugs.. I know I'm OCD but if it were my vehicle I'd be taking whatever I'd need along the way. I keep coolant hoses, a water pump, thermostat, auxiliary belt, alternator, distributor, arm cap plug and leads in the scirocco along with a dedicated car tool kit in the scirocco because I can, and because I really hate waiting for recover trucks wink lol Also, don't be tempted to try adding TCW3 to your fuel, it's a false economy and a placebo. If you must try an additive 2EHN is the only way to go, at a rate of 1ml/litre. 2EHN increases cetane number and reduces ignition delay - people report smoother idle, more power, less smoke and better MPGs
 
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Be very careful taking your truck to the jiffy lube places. I highly doubt they will have the proper diesel rated oil for you, let alone the proper filters. I could see some knuckle head popping the hood on your truck, seeing 10w30 on the oil cap, and using whatever flavor they have on hand which will most likely NOT be CJ4 rated. I agree with Clevy, either get familiar with doing it yourself or seek out a dealer wherever you happen to be. Depending on how much traveling you do you can coordinate most of your oil changes while your home. Speaking of filters, your going to have to be a little more picky about filter brands. The filters for these trucks are high volume units that have to withstand high oil pressure on start up when the engine is cold. Buying the correct fuel filters with adequate micron ratings to protect that expensive fuel system is important. I have no idea what is available for the Powerstrokes but do some research, find something your comfortsble with that meets or exceeds Fords requirements and buy enough to last you at least a couple of changes. Carry a spare fuel filter on long trips in case you get a bad batch of fuel (been there done that). I buy all my filters from Filter Pro for my diesels and have them shipped to my door. http://filterspro.com/
 

smcrea

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Anyone heard of Royal Purple Oil? My Buddy swears by it, and some of the reviews are great!.. Is it REALLY that good?
 

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Originally Posted By: jrmason
Be very careful taking your truck to the jiffy lube places. I highly doubt they will have the proper diesel rated oil for you, let alone the proper filters. I could see some knuckle head popping the hood on your truck, seeing 10w30 on the oil cap, and using whatever flavor they have on hand which will most likely NOT be CJ4 rated. I agree with Clevy, either get familiar with doing it yourself or seek out a dealer wherever you happen to be. Depending on how much traveling you do you can coordinate most of your oil changes while your home. Speaking of filters, your going to have to be a little more picky about filter brands. The filters for these trucks are high volume units that have to withstand high oil pressure on start up when the engine is cold. Buying the correct fuel filters with adequate micron ratings to protect that expensive fuel system is important. I have no idea what is available for the Powerstrokes but do some research, find something your comfortsble with that meets or exceeds Fords requirements and buy enough to last you at least a couple of changes. Carry a spare fuel filter on long trips in case you get a bad batch of fuel (been there done that). I buy all my filters from Filter Pro for my diesels and have them shipped to my door. http://filterspro.com/
Good advise! thanks! I've just watched a few youtube videos on changing my oil and it looks easy. I always used to change my own oil and then came to the conclusion that getting my hands dirty wasn't worth the few bucks that I would spend by taking it to an oil shop. But now I'm learning that in a diesel that all oils are not equal by any stretch then I'm really looking to doing it myself. Looks like you can get the job done in 10 minutes or less and plenty of clearance under that 4WD :-) so no need to jack it up or anything as with other cars! So I think I will plan to do it myself at home and if I'm away on a trip then take it to a Ford dealer!
 
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Originally Posted By: dustyroads
Originally Posted By: A_Harman
I'm with the dealer on this. Don't break it in easy. It's good to get some cylinder pressure to seat the rings. We had a rule at Cummins that if an engine didn't get to full power within its first 20 minutes of running, the liners would glaze, and the rings would never seat. Maybe this was already done at the factory when the engine was first tested. But it wouldn't hurt to get on it for 5-10 seconds at a time for about 10 times to seat the rings. Bearings and roller-follower valvetrains don't need breaking in. Then change the oil and filter at about 1500-2000 miles.
A_Harman, do they not put new engines on a dyno for awhile to make sure they are performing as specified? I thought that was the case with all heavy diesel builders but maybe it's not enough to do any ring seating (?). Have anything to share about that? By the way, back in early 2000 I took a quick tour of Cummins in Columbus, Indiana. I got there at a bad time so it was abbreviated but got to watch both N14's and ISX being assembled. It was very cool.
Yes, when I worked at Cummins, they would test each of the heavy-duty engines for 30 minutes, and the test cycle worked the engines up to rated power within 20 minutes. I was friends with the Senior Tech Advisor who was in charge of cylinder kit development, and he was adamant that the engines had to get to high power quickly to properly seat the rings. I worked at the Cummins Tech Center, which was across the road from the Engine Plant that you toured. In 2012, I visited Cummins again when I was working for a supplier, and had my meetings in the Engine Plant. It's changed a lot since 2000. They only do machining of the ISX engine blocks there, and have moved heavy-duty engine assembly out. The 5L V8 diesel for the Nissan Titan will be assembled there. They had the whole production line already set up, and were running test batches of engines down it.
 
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Originally Posted By: A_Harman
Originally Posted By: dustyroads
Originally Posted By: A_Harman
I'm with the dealer on this. Don't break it in easy. It's good to get some cylinder pressure to seat the rings. We had a rule at Cummins that if an engine didn't get to full power within its first 20 minutes of running, the liners would glaze, and the rings would never seat. Maybe this was already done at the factory when the engine was first tested. But it wouldn't hurt to get on it for 5-10 seconds at a time for about 10 times to seat the rings. Bearings and roller-follower valvetrains don't need breaking in. Then change the oil and filter at about 1500-2000 miles.
A_Harman, do they not put new engines on a dyno for awhile to make sure they are performing as specified? I thought that was the case with all heavy diesel builders but maybe it's not enough to do any ring seating (?). Have anything to share about that? By the way, back in early 2000 I took a quick tour of Cummins in Columbus, Indiana. I got there at a bad time so it was abbreviated but got to watch both N14's and ISX being assembled. It was very cool.
Yes, when I worked at Cummins, they would test each of the heavy-duty engines for 30 minutes, and the test cycle worked the engines up to rated power within 20 minutes. I was friends with the Senior Tech Advisor who was in charge of cylinder kit development, and he was adamant that the engines had to get to high power quickly to properly seat the rings. I worked at the Cummins Tech Center, which was across the road from the Engine Plant that you toured. In 2012, I visited Cummins again when I was working for a supplier, and had my meetings in the Engine Plant. It's changed a lot since 2000. They only do machining of the ISX engine blocks there, and have moved heavy-duty engine assembly out. The 5L V8 diesel for the Nissan Titan will be assembled there. They had the whole production line already set up, and were running test batches of engines down it.
Thanks for the reply sir! Very cool info in the update, too. I can't wait to see the new Titans, mostly for that new 5L V8. Do you know if anyone does the same kind of dyno run in light duty diesels like the OP's Ford V8 or Cummins, GM, etc ?
 
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Originally Posted By: smcrea
Anyone heard of Royal Purple Oil? My Buddy swears by it, and some of the reviews are great!.. Is it REALLY that good?
Royal Purple makes very good oil. I'm completely unfamiliar with their heavy duty diesel oils so I'll defer that to someone else. Glad to see you're interested in changing your own oil. As has already been said, make sure you use a CJ-4 rated diesel oil and get the proper filters. Having someone else do it for you will almost certainly get you an overfill of oil. I've found many guys in shops to be careless about cleanliness. For example using dirty rags for wiping the dipstick or getting oily hand prints all over my truck. I apogize for my part in derailing your thread by going on about the differentials. Hopefully you get something out it anyway. I also watched a recent 0-60 run of a new Super Duty diesel on TFLtruck. That's not the purpose of said truck, but wow what a nice engine/trans combo. Amazing power, shifting and nicely programmed. Congrats on the new ride!
 
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This in a nutshell is pretty much the preponderance of evidence I have ever seen for the effectiveness of the oil.
Originally Posted By: smcrea
Anyone heard of Royal Purple Oil? My Buddy swears by it, and some of the reviews are great!.. Is it REALLY that good?
 
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I think Ford recommends following the EVIC for oil changes which could be anywhere between 5k and 10-12k miles on the higher end. With the frequency of changes and the quantity of oil required at each change I would be bargain shopping for CJ4 10w30 and buying up stock. The only way high end oils make sense to me is for running extended drain intervals, but you must follow the EVIC for warranty reasons. Any 10w30 that meets the CJ4 requirement will work just fine. On a side note, a friend of mine owns a 2nd generation 6.7. He was just telling me the service intervals for the transmission are 150k miles. To me, that's just crazy. Ive been around automatic transmissions that tow and by 50-60k miles there is a good bit of clutch material in the pan and the magnet and the fluid has turned color. 150k miles in a truck with 800 lb ft of torque that is designed to tow is torture on any fluid. Ford must really have a lot of confidence in their transmissions.
 
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CT8

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Originally Posted By: jrmason
I think Ford recommends following the EVIC for oil changes which could be anywhere between 5k and 10-12k miles on the higher end. With the frequency of changes and the quantity of oil required at each change I would be bargain shopping for CJ4 10w30 and buying up stock. The only way high end oils make sense to me is for running extended drain intervals, but you must follow the EVIC for warranty reasons. Any 10w30 that meets the CJ4 requirement will work just fine. On a side note, a friend of mine owns a 2nd generation 6.7. He was just telling me the service intervals for the transmission are 150k miles. To me, that's just crazy. Ive been around automatic transmissions that tow and by 50-60k miles there is a good bit of clutch material in the pan and the magnet and the fluid has turned color. 150k miles in a truck with 800 lb ft of torque that is designed to tow is torture on any fluid. Ford must really have a lot of confidence in their transmissions.
Probably the original owners will have sold or traded in their trucks before then. Not many people keep them that long.
 
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Originally Posted By: dustyroads
Originally Posted By: A_Harman
Originally Posted By: dustyroads
Originally Posted By: A_Harman
I'm with the dealer on this. Don't break it in easy. It's good to get some cylinder pressure to seat the rings. We had a rule at Cummins that if an engine didn't get to full power within its first 20 minutes of running, the liners would glaze, and the rings would never seat. Maybe this was already done at the factory when the engine was first tested. But it wouldn't hurt to get on it for 5-10 seconds at a time for about 10 times to seat the rings. Bearings and roller-follower valvetrains don't need breaking in. Then change the oil and filter at about 1500-2000 miles.
A_Harman, do they not put new engines on a dyno for awhile to make sure they are performing as specified? I thought that was the case with all heavy diesel builders but maybe it's not enough to do any ring seating (?). Have anything to share about that? By the way, back in early 2000 I took a quick tour of Cummins in Columbus, Indiana. I got there at a bad time so it was abbreviated but got to watch both N14's and ISX being assembled. It was very cool.
Yes, when I worked at Cummins, they would test each of the heavy-duty engines for 30 minutes, and the test cycle worked the engines up to rated power within 20 minutes. I was friends with the Senior Tech Advisor who was in charge of cylinder kit development, and he was adamant that the engines had to get to high power quickly to properly seat the rings. I worked at the Cummins Tech Center, which was across the road from the Engine Plant that you toured. In 2012, I visited Cummins again when I was working for a supplier, and had my meetings in the Engine Plant. It's changed a lot since 2000. They only do machining of the ISX engine blocks there, and have moved heavy-duty engine assembly out. The 5L V8 diesel for the Nissan Titan will be assembled there. They had the whole production line already set up, and were running test batches of engines down it.
Thanks for the reply sir! Very cool info in the update, too. I can't wait to see the new Titans, mostly for that new 5L V8. Do you know if anyone does the same kind of dyno run in light duty diesels like the OP's Ford V8 or Cummins, GM, etc ?
No, I don't know what the initial dyno testing for the light-duty pickup diesels are.
 
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