Brake Bleeding Sequence

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Jan 1, 2012
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NY
Does it really make a difference in which sequence brakes are bled? Each corner has it's own line back to the master cylinder - so I'm having are hard time figuring out why any sequence would be better than another.
 
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What master cylinder has a separate line for each wheel? What Year, Make, and model is it? Any extra options it has?
 
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Jul 24, 2011
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Missouri
Originally Posted By: Blaze
I've always started with the longest line first. Passenger rear.
I was taught to start at the farthest from the master cylinder and work my way to the closest. That's what I've always done and it has worked. Works even better with a power bleeder such as the Vacula.
 

djb

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Jan 16, 2006
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Los Gatos CA
It really doesn't matter. But all else being equal, follow the rule. The saying "the right way, the wrong way, and the Army way" applies here. It doesn't matter if you drive on the right side or the left side. What matters is that everyone does it the same way each time. If you are doing the same job repeatedly, you don't have to remember which wheels have been bled. Just which one you serviced previously.
 
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Mar 20, 2006
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Canada
Originally Posted By: greasegunn
Does it really make a difference in which sequence brakes are bled? Each corner has it's own line back to the master cylinder
What kinda car? Some have a front/rear split, and some have a diagonal split. Manufacturers do specify a bleed order, and I can't see that they do that just for fun. Also, all the dual-circuit systems I'm familiar with (but I'm no expert) have TWO lines going from the master cylinder to the proportioning valve, then FOUR lines from the valve to the wheels.
 
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Aug 30, 2004
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Originally Posted By: Tegger
Originally Posted By: greasegunn
Does it really make a difference in which sequence brakes are bled? Each corner has it's own line back to the master cylinder
What kinda car? Some have a front/rear split, and some have a diagonal split. Manufacturers do specify a bleed order, and I can't see that they do that just for fun. Also, all the dual-circuit systems I'm familiar with (but I'm no expert) have TWO lines going from the master cylinder to the proportioning valve, then FOUR lines from the valve to the wheels.
Correct, it's important to consider the system design in your approach. But instead, check the factory service manual for the correct procedure.
 
Joined
Apr 17, 2006
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Lake Forest, CA
Originally Posted By: bdcardinal
Yes it does make a difference. Some vehicles, especially Honda, if you do not follow their sequence you will end up with a soft pedal.
I just done the bleeding for 2004 Honda S2000 about 3-4 weeks ago, I started at the driver rear and went counter clockwise to driver front. The pedal was and is firmer after bleeding with Mityvac 7201. A week later I worked on MB E430, I started at passenger rear and again went counter clockwise to driver rear. Same Mityvac 7201 was used and brake pedal is as firm as ever. From my experience bleeding sequence doesn't matter, as long as you don't let the master cylinder reservoir goes dry of brake fluid.
 
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