Are magnetic drain plugs worth it?

Messages
33
Location
Ottawa
I have an opportunity to buy a few drain plugs for mine and my wifes' engine for very cheap through a local group-buy. Just wondering if they're worth it ($cheap) especially considering they're extremely-magnetic rare-earth magnets, which are stronger than neodymium ones from what I've read. The cars they'll be in are a 2004 Acura TSX with a brand new engine block (still partially within break-in you could say), and a 2002 Mazda Protege5 with 110,000 km's on the clock. Opinions welcome! Thanks, Eric
 

Al

Messages
19,248
Location
Elizabethtown, Pa
I don't think we have ever reached a conclusion on them on this board. I would go for it though. At the very least they won't hurt. Nice to be able to see the collection of stuff that it does or does not attract.
 

curls

Thread starter
Messages
33
Location
Ottawa
quote:
Originally posted by Jonny Z: Would the strong magnet interfere with the engine electronics, sensors, etc?
No, especially since it's at the bottom of the oil pan anyhow. I ordered two (one for each car)... as you guys said, it can't hurt and can only really help, even if just to "see" what's gonna get stuck to it.
 
Messages
2,338
Location
Charlotte Metro area
I just put a computer hard drive magnet on the drain plug. Certainly doesn't hurt anything. Those magnets are STRONG. I also put one on the bottom of the auto transmission pan. I bet that area of the pan will be very grungy whenever it is dropped and cleaned.
 
Messages
346
Location
New Mexico
quote:
Originally posted by Titan: I just put a computer hard drive magnet on the drain plug. Certainly doesn't hurt anything. Those magnets are STRONG. I also put one on the bottom of the auto transmission pan. I bet that area of the pan will be very grungy whenever it is dropped and cleaned.
You are so right, Titan. I do the same. [Cheers!]
 
Messages
3,833
Location
NEPA
It won't grab aluminum, copper, tin, lead. Hmm, Fe particles that are not captured become magnatized and circulate to adhere to another part of the engine....great.
 
Messages
4,478
Location
Southern California
Any particles that become magnetized by the drain plug magnet, aren't going anywhere because they'll be stuck to that rare earth magnet. [Wink] Chrome and cobalt are also highly magnetic, so paticles of those metals will be caught in addition to iron. (By the way, neodymium magnets are one type of rare-earth magnet, folks.)
 
Messages
157
Location
Roseville, MI
My 2005 GMC has a magnetic drain plug from the factory. I found some debris on the plug when I change the oil at 500 miles. I have seldom found anything since, now at ~22K miles. Jason
 
Messages
336
Location
Schwenksville, PA
I have one on my Volvo. (Volvo owners - very inexpensive from FCP Groton!!) There's usually a few tiny, black, dust-speck sized iron particals on it when I do an OC. If for no other reason, they can be practical if you have a steel oil pan. Whenever I'm draining hot oil, I just loosen it and quickly slide it over and let it stick directly to the pan while the oil drains out. No more dropping it into & fishing it out of a waste oil bin.
 

Kestas

Staff member
Messages
13,958
Location
The Motor City
quote:
Originally posted by Ray H: ... Chrome and cobalt are also highly magnetic, so paticles of those metals will be caught in addition to iron...
The only metals that are ferromagnetic are iron, nickel, cobalt, and dysprosium.
 
Messages
4,478
Location
Southern California
Baloney. Ever heard of pure chromium dioxide coated audio and video tape? It requires a higher bias current than ferric oxide coatings, but has wider frequency response and superior magnetic retention. Less susceptible to coating "shedding", too. (Betcha wondered what that "Fe/CrO2" switch was for on your seventies era stereo audio cassette deck, huh? [Wink] ) [ September 18, 2006, 06:08 PM: Message edited by: Ray H ]
 

Kestas

Staff member
Messages
13,958
Location
The Motor City
Chromium dioxide is not a metal. For a person who lists chrome as "being highly magnetic", you're not qualified to "set me straight".
 

Al

Messages
19,248
Location
Elizabethtown, Pa
quote:
Originally posted by Quickbeam: Nah, it'll be fine. Fwiw I use a cow magnet in the filter. Stirrer mags work too. Picks up a surprising amount of stuff.
In the filter. [Eek!] what goes in can come out. I assume you meant "on" the filter.
 
Messages
2,533
Location
Pittsburgh, PA
I don't think they hurt. Better for a tranny or axle where there's not a filter. SuperPlug still owes me one from a year ago. They sent the wrong size, I sent it back, never got another one, and I could never get a response. Phone number disconnected.
 
Messages
4,478
Location
Southern California
quote:
Originally posted by Kestas: Chromium dioxide is not a metal. For a person who lists chrome as "being highly magnetic", you're not qualified to "set me straight".
Oh, I believe I am, indeed, Kestas. [Smile] To reiterate for your enjoyment and enrichment: chrome is highly magnetic. [Wink] Chromium dioxide is obviously the oxidized form of the pure metallic element, chromium. Nevertheless, the elemental chromium, bound to oxygen though it may be, continues to exhibit its full magnetic properties. I have a handheld video tape eraser I used to use when I recorded magnetically. (Now I've seen the light - laser light...) Trust me, when I press the eraser's button and draw it near a video cassette, I can feel the 60 Hz vibration as the tape physically strains to react to the alternating magnetic field of the eraser. Have nice evening, Bud! [Cheers!]
 
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