Any info on Stewarts 91 Premium Non-Ethanol Gas (NE Area)

Joined
Feb 19, 2009
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The Woods of NY
Happy New Year everyone. I have been thinking about a fuel/gas i love but know little about - Stewarts 91 Premium Non-Ethanol gasoline. I use this fuel in anything that requires gas haha. The small engines (leaf blower, chainsaw, ect) start easier, and run like a top under all conditions. I've never had to clean the carb either in years on any of the equipment with use of this gas.
The 2.4L DI Sonata will average a solid 35 mpg not even trying and with over 52K miles of use - since new, i never had injector, fuel pump, sparkplug, or carbon build up issues. The throttle feels alive, id go as far to say responsive for a Sonata, as it has power under all conditions without having to redline.
Same story with the Elantra. Better gas mileage with more pep but most noticeable under 1/4 throttle input, it just feels like it has slightly more tq, and the transmission does not need to downshift to increase speed. So my questions are

Who is the supplier/ manufacturer for Stewarts gasoline, and more specifically, the 91 ethanol free?
Is the fuel TT?
I cant find much info on it so anything is better. Stewarts only has about 275 stations in the NE that supply 91 Ethanol Free.


This is what Stewarts website says... Not much...

Benefits of Using Our Non-Ethanol Gas:

  • Higher energy content. More energy = More power
  • Improved gas mileage (around 4%)
  • No dependence on ethanol crops
  • Significantly much less harm to engines
  • Does not corrode the engine
  • Increases expected life on smaller engines
  • Less costly to produce
  • Uses fewer fossil fuels

  • What is Non-Ethanol Gas?


    Non-Ethanol gasoline is a high-quality type of fuel that does not include added ethanol. Ethanol is a form of grain alcohol that is blended together with pure gasoline to be used in motor vehicles. Ethanol is made up of feedstocks that include sugarcane, wheat, corn, barley, other grains, and high starch/sugar crops.


    What Makes Using Stewart’s Gas better?


    Many of our competitors and gas chains sell 90 Octane Non-Ethanol gasoline while Stewart’s sells 91 Octane PREMIUM Non-Ethanol. Generally, newer cars are recommended to run on higher octane levels. Our Premium version provides for optimum fuel efficiency, improved mileage performance, and is significantly less harsh on your engine. Fuel up at Stewart’s to give your engine the better gas it deserves.

    Thank you for the wonderful information this forum provides.
 
Joined
Sep 19, 2008
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Pennsylvania
Agree with atikovi. Usually, the higher octane components are highly branched hydrocarbons, toluene and xylene. The yields of these is lower from crude than more linear hydrocarbons. Now, could this gasoline contain something like MTBE? If so, they could use this as an oxygenate and get higher octane.
 
Joined
Jun 15, 2003
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We can only get 90 here and it's pretty rare. Seems to be Citgo/Sunoco branded, mostly.

90 is the base that with ethanol is 93. So perhaps Stewarts 91 is related to Sunoco's ultra 94 insofar as it's available at their terminal.
 
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You do realize the benefit to using ethanol gas in the cold NY winter is not dealing with potential water in the fuel system issues of yesteryear.
 
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Daytona Beach
By the way, most premium comes in to the terminal as base gas of a lower octane, say 90 - 91. It's only after the ethanol is added does it reach the full pump octane as 93-94.
 
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Back in the early 2010's was on a trip to the Ozark Plateau. In Springfield, MO I purchased 93 octane E0. Have not seen it since in any other area. Can anyone confirm that this is still available. It was purchased from a Phillips 66 at a major intersection.

Thanks
 
Joined
Jan 1, 2003
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Daytona Beach
Is ethanol the only thing added to the 90-91 gas?
No, the additive pack is also injected at the terminal. Since all stations use the same gas, but different customers require different add packs.
All of the "fundamental" properties of fuel are already included. Such as distillation, octane, vapor pressure, etc.

And I'm talking both grades of fuel, since mid grade is just a blend of 84 and 90+.
 
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Oh, yeah, I almost forgot. There is a brief period in the fall when switching from low RVP back to high (winter blend) rvp gasoline when the butane is blended back into the gas.
For summer blend, butane is removed at the refinery and stored in underground caves. It is a liquid up to about 90 degrees F and slight pressure (look at a lighter) but it does boil at a low temperature, causing high evaporation rates, and consequently high RVP.

In the fall, this liquid is removed from the caves and transported in pressurized tank trucks back into storage tanks at the terminal where it is mixed back into the gasoline.
 
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Oh, yeah, I almost forgot. There is a brief period in the fall when switching from low RVP back to high (winter blend) rvp gasoline when the butane is blended back into the gas.
For summer blend, butane is removed at the refinery and stored in underground caves. It is a liquid up to about 90 degrees F and slight pressure (look at a lighter) but it does boil at a low temperature, causing high evaporation rates, and consequently high RVP.

As a total non-sequitur, I remember using butane (or isobutane) canisters for backpacking stoves. Most were isobutane which had better performance in cold temperatures, but the real key was that they typically had maybe 20% propane. And the canisters weren’t heavy enough for just propane, but had heavier walls than butane cartridges (common for Korean single burner portable stoves). It was weird too when using them near the limit for the butane. The propane helped with cold temps, but too low and the propane would preferentially vaporize leaving mostly butane.

I also remember some weird stuff, including people asking about refilling those containers. I don’t believe is was illegal to merely do that, but it was illegal to transport them in a motor vehicle once refilled. The usual would be butane which was easy to get and wouldn’t blow up the container. Then some asked about e filling with propane, which was crazy.
 
Joined
Nov 16, 2006
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Long Island, NY
Used the Stewarts non-ethanol premium several times travelling upstate. Politics aside, didn't notice much difference in mileage or performance from 93 octane 10% ethanol downstate premium vs the 91 non-ethanol. (Ford Ecoboost 2.0)
 
Joined
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ethanol is of NO benefit except for the producers + OUR TAX $$$$ subsidizes it !!!

No. It's the most effective octane booster on the market and some sort of octane boosting oxygenate is pretty much the only way we're going to meet current demand for higher octane fuel.

But depending on the market price, it's actually cheaper. Certainly now the spot price for denatured ethanol is less than RBOB. And RBOB is useless without ethanol as it's about 84 (R+M)/2 octane.
 
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