Any Glaze Users ?

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May 11, 2018
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GA
Originally Posted by PimTac
Here is a old article on glaze. https://www.detailingspot.com/?page_id=239 For most owners it's not a necessary step, especially if you clay.
Even though it's an old piece...I'd agree that it's not a "necessary" step. Here are the key points made:
  • If a car is detailed properly then there will be no need to use a glaze to fill imperfections.
  • Using a glaze to ‘beautify' a car…darken its appearance and give it a wetter look…may be a good idea if you are ‘showing' your car.
  • Glaze will wash off fairly quickly so ensure that you don't apply and then immediately wash your car.
  • Good practice is to apply a glaze and then apply a wax or sealant.
  • Depending on the glaze you use, it may or may not offer protection…in general, glazes do not offer any protective qualities.
  • Glaze does not replace polishing!
  • If a car is detailed properly then there will be no need to use a glaze to fill imperfections.
Yeah...I think those points are all well taken. No one NEEDS to use Glaze...it's a choice...but it does do what it's designed to do.
 
Joined
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Tinton Falls NJ
Originally Posted by HYUNDAIFAN0001
Originally Posted by parshisa
It's been proven using gloss meter that neither wax no glaze/sealant increases the gloss reading. Polished to perfection paint - does. Don't waste your time and money on the glaze. Or do, if it makes you happy
So far other than your staunch opinions...nothing has been proven of the sort.
Originally Posted by gofast182
You keep coming back to car shows, cars that only see sunlight for several hours at a time and rain, never. A blemish free clearcoat and high quality LSP are going to yield the best possible shine and stand up to more than being on the lawn of a show/concours for a day.
Actually, many of those carshow cars are driven quite regularly...we see them driving on the streets as well as at restaurants, gas stations, malls, stores, the highway, etc. We personally know 3 of the owners and they drive their show cars "as much as possible to enjoy them - rain or shine" (pun intended). There is no such thing as a blemish-free clear-coat - which is why they make all sorts of detailing products...to keep the clear-coat protected and in good condition (especially UV protection) and also add shine. So after all this noise about clear-cost, car washing, and other distractions... ...yes, plenty of people use glaze and it renders additional shine when properly applied. Seems simple enough to most people.
You have a penchant for always being right and having the last word. Blemish free is a relative term (as you know) and yes the cars have to get to and from the shows, get gas, and a few may be driven beyond that, but the point remains cars that could actually benefit from a glaze relative to upkeep are not ones that are driven on any kind of regular basis in varying conditions.
 
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Originally Posted by gofast182
You have a penchant for always being right ....
When one's right, they're right. cheers
Originally Posted by gofast182
[Blemish free is a relative term (as you know) ...
not at all...it's quite specific... Anyone driving a vehicle that wants it to look like a car show car can benefit. Naysayers might be surprised how many of those folks are out there...more than they think.
 
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You don't need glaze for a car show shine however that may be defined. The reality is, when clearcoats became the norm many moons ago glaze was forgotten. That is why you see and hear about glaze at car shows. But even that is disappearing as old cars are now being defined as from the 70's and 80's. One sacrilege you see more and more nowadays are true antiques that have been repainted with a clearcoat. It's not right. They should stay with the old paint methods but less and less people know how to do that.
 
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Originally Posted by PimTac
You don't need glaze for a car show shine however that may be defined. The reality is, when clearcoats became the norm many moons ago glaze was forgotten.
Which totally contradicts the actual SEMA car show cars, some of which have multiple coats of clear-coat on them and also use glaze products. The local detailers also use glaze on newer vehicles, and it shows. In addition, there are now more glaze products on the market than nearly ever before...and they can't be targeting just the older paint structure vehicles...or they'll be out of business in months.
 
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Originally Posted by HYUNDAIFAN0001
Originally Posted by gofast182
You have a penchant for always being right ....
When one's right, they're right. cheers
Originally Posted by gofast182
[Blemish free is a relative term (as you know) ...
not at all...it's quite specific... Anyone driving a vehicle that wants it to look like a car show car can benefit. Naysayers might be surprised how many of those folks are out there...more than they think.
Right, dogmatic...same thing I guess. cheers
 
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Iowa
Originally Posted by HYUNDAIFAN0001
Originally Posted by gofast182
I'm pretty sure that sealant needs to bond to the clearcoat so putting it on top of glaze might not be the best idea.
Multiple layers of product can adhere to the clearcoat layer. Polish is designed to smooth out the clearcoat surface. Glaze adds a very thin layer. A quality sealant (wax) can adhere to any clearcoat surface after either/both products (assuming the original 1st step was to clay bar the surface).
No problems with LSP adhering to the clear coat using glaze first. The glaze will fill and hide any imperfections before doing your LSP.
 
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Wax? Absolutely. A polymer sealant? I disagree. If the glaze contains wax or oils a polymer sealant will not bond to it, or, maybe better put, to the extent it does bond it is subject to wash away at the rate the glaze would. Not all products are formulated equally so I'm sure there is a combination that would work but for most casual shoppers and even enthusiasts who do not match up the chemical composition of each step, the best option *for longevity* is to polish, IPA wipe, seal, wax/glaze (if you even believe in glaze).
 
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Originally Posted by gofast182
Wax? Absolutely. A polymer sealant? I disagree. If the glaze contains wax or oils a polymer sealant will not bond to it, or, maybe better put, to the extent it does bond it is subject to wash away at the rate the glaze would. Not all products are formulated equally so I'm sure there is a combination that would work but for most casual shoppers and even enthusiasts who do not match up the chemical composition of each step, the best option *for longevity* is to polish, IPA wipe, seal, wax/glaze (if you even believe in glaze).
Most people are happy and believe with what they see on tv and pick up at the parts store or Walmart. If you own or detail a black vehicle, you would believe/love glaze. And yes, I have had success with the Adams products I first posted.
 
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When I detailed in the past I had a few customers that simply would not pay for clay and machine polishing. They just wanted the paint to shine so out came the Poorboy's Glazes depending on the color of the car. It was explained that this would a temporary fix and they were happy with that. Glaze has it's place, I gave them what they wanted at a price they could afford.
 
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Originally Posted by RTexasF
When I detailed in the past I had a few customers that simply would not pay for clay and machine polishing. They just wanted the paint to shine so out came the Poorboy's Glazes depending on the color of the car. It was explained that this would a temporary fix and they were happy with that. Glaze has it's place, I gave them what they wanted at a price they could afford.
Poorboy's makes a great glaze and awesome price point, like all their products. Yes glaze has its place.
 

JHZR2

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If one wants to read further on #7, they should go through this thread: https://www.autogeekonline.net/foru...goodbye-old-friend-hello-new-friend.html
Quote
The feature that makes #7 unique are the TS Oils or Trade Secret Oils used to create this pure, non-abrasive polish formulated back in the 1920's. The product itself, #7 Sealer Reseal Glaze I'm told by Barry Meguiar, was introduced in the 1930's but the unique oil base behind the product was created by the founder, Frank Meguiar Jr. back during the time of the Model T. ... The technique I use to restore antique paint is to apply a heavy saturation of #7 Show Car Glaze and then let it soak in over night. The next morning I'll remove the first application and then repeat the process 2-3 more times depending upon how severe the oxidation is and how important it is to me to restore and preserve the original paint. ... 1: Act as a lubricant between the paint and the nap or tiny loops of fiber that make up cotton terry cloth. As you rub the #7 over the paint these oils lubricate the surface as the tiny loops of fiber act as a gentle form of abrasive to gently remove years and even decades of dead oxidized paint. This is a dramatically safer approach than the knee-jerk reaction and method most detailers would use which would be to apply a coarse compound or even more caveman... wet sand. 2: The oils penetrate into the paint where they react with the pigments and restore the full richness of color.
 
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Originally Posted by JHZR2
If one wants to read further on #7, they should go through this thread: https://www.autogeekonline.net/foru...goodbye-old-friend-hello-new-friend.html
Quote
The feature that makes #7 unique are the TS Oils or Trade Secret Oils used to create this pure, non-abrasive polish formulated back in the 1920's. The product itself, #7 Sealer Reseal Glaze I'm told by Barry Meguiar, was introduced in the 1930's but the unique oil base behind the product was created by the founder, Frank Meguiar Jr. back during the time of the Model T. ... The technique I use to restore antique paint is to apply a heavy saturation of #7 Show Car Glaze and then let it soak in over night. The next morning I'll remove the first application and then repeat the process 2-3 more times depending upon how severe the oxidation is and how important it is to me to restore and preserve the original paint. ... 1: Act as a lubricant between the paint and the nap or tiny loops of fiber that make up cotton terry cloth. As you rub the #7 over the paint these oils lubricate the surface as the tiny loops of fiber act as a gentle form of abrasive to gently remove years and even decades of dead oxidized paint. This is a dramatically safer approach than the knee-jerk reaction and method most detailers would use which would be to apply a coarse compound or even more caveman... wet sand. 2: The oils penetrate into the paint where they react with the pigments and restore the full richness of color.
Great find. Thanks for linking that. Note the comment by Mike Phillips on post #26. He is a well known expert on anything related to auto detailing.
 
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Originally Posted by NissanMaxima
Nothing but hand washing for me too. I suppose there are reliable no touch washes out there, and that's why I mentioned that, but not worth the risk to me. Besides the danger of contact with brushes, who knows what harsh chemicals are used. If you have a nice finish, a hand wash is the only way to keep it. On the rare occasions, the car has to go to the dealer, I always need to remember to tell them to skip their "courtesy wash".
I did the same when I purchased my LaCrosse last week. The salesman said they could run it over to a local car wash as well as gas it up for me. I said, "Gas is fine. Skip the car wash."
 
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