Anti-seize on brake pad ear slider hardware?

Joined
Sep 24, 2020
Messages
683
Location
New Bedford, MA
OK update:
cleaned all the slider pins on all the calipers, a majority of them were already frozen in place!! 😮 I used the new lubrication that I should’ve used the first time 😂 And installed the new caliper bracket

All is well thankfully!

Thank you for all the feedback! premature wear out of the pads has been avoided! All the pins move beautifully now.

🙏
Being in NY with the snow you get, I would recommend once a year (I do before and after winter here in MA) relube Slide pins, take pads out, clean up any rust or salt debris on or under the clips
 
Joined
Jun 6, 2013
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sw ohio
That was my point: the FSM says one thing, but the factory does something else.

Similar to how Honda's FSM says to use anti-seize on spark plugs, but it is clear that it was not used from the factory.
It was on my Honda v6. Maybe honda can’t make up its mind…
 
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Apr 1, 2020
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Pacific Northwest
The past several years I've been working through a big jar of purple Permatex brake caliper grease. Seems to work as well as anything else I've used over the years. No stuck pins or pads, though we don't see much rust jacking here like you rust belt guys.
 
Joined
Jan 29, 2012
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Canada
Permatex purple and green seem to have rumors of swelling rubber. I personally experienced Permatex purple swelling up the rubber dampers in the slide pins, so I only use Sil-Glyde on slide pins now. Even if your slide pins don't have a damper, using the wrong grease can deteriorate the rubber boots to a point where they don't clamp as tight which lets water in the sliders.

I still have a small can of Permatex green left, will only be using that on the ears. It'll probably be a lifetime supply for me.
 

JHZR2

Staff member
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Dec 14, 2002
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New Jersey
That was my point: the FSM says one thing, but the factory does something else.

Similar to how Honda's FSM says to use anti-seize on spark plugs, but it is clear that it was not used from the factory.
New, clean product versus older surfaces that have seen wear, salt, etc.
 
Joined
Jul 10, 2022
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Antiseize is ugly messy stuff after a while. Even for its intended purpose it dries out a lot.
I used it liberally on the insides of my wife's brake rotors, they were a bear to get off even with a sledge hammer. Be curious to see how they come off say 5 years later. I put it on the hubs and the rotor hats on the inside.

Funny anyone remember fixed calipers? My Lexus has them front and rear. My BMW floating all 4, as is our GM. But the newer GMs I think are back to fixed. Cop suvs have the 16" rotors with 6 piston calipers on the front, impressive lol
 
Joined
Sep 24, 2020
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New Bedford, MA
I used it liberally on the insides of my wife's brake rotors, they were a bear to get off even with a sledge hammer. Be curious to see how they come off say 5 years later. I put it on the hubs and the rotor hats on the inside.

Funny anyone remember fixed calipers? My Lexus has them front and rear. My BMW floating all 4, as is our GM. But the newer GMs I think are back to fixed. Cop suvs have the 16" rotors with 6 piston calipers on the front, impressive lol
I did same thing, had no problems getting off after a year or so, pulled right off. I don’t think you will have much of a problem. Hopefully
 

D60

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Nov 6, 2017
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1,333
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Colo
I feel like people may be confusing two potential aspects of anti-seize here.

1) putting it between two steel surfaces that are mashed or slipped together to slow rust is one thing and it seems to at least buy time. Mating surfaces where rotors meet wb hubs or unit bearings bolt to knuckles are potential examples.

2) using it on surfaces that are supposed to MOVE like slider pins and brake pad ears is very different. It does tend to sort of solidify into a thick paste and thus I'm not sure it's the ideal lubricant or grease for moving parts

I'm not necessarily saying ANYONE here is right or wrong, just that metal surfaces clamped together and moving parts are very different applications.
 
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