Another Biodiesel Article

MolaKule

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From Chemical Online Newletter, author anonymous.
quote:
World Energy Signs Exclusive Biodiesel Production Agreement With Dow Chemical Subsidiary 1/19/2005 What connects 40,000 gallons of vegetable oil, an entrepreneurial bioenergy firm, and the world's largest chemical producer? The search for viable sources of alternative energy. Today World Energy, the nation's premier producer and distributor of biodiesel fuel, announced an exclusive production agreement with Dow Haltermann Custom Processing (DHCP), a Dow business unit comprised of operations within The Dow Chemical Company and Johann Haltermann, Ltd. This agreement will further enhance World Energy's biodiesel production and distribution capabilities and is another step in helping America reduce its dependency on foreign oil. "We are very enthusiastic about our collaboration with Dow," said Gene Gebolys, founder and president of World Energy. "Dow's global reputation for manufacturing excellence coupled with our rigorous attention to high-quality biodiesel production results in a win for both companies, as well as for consumers and the environment." DHCP will produce biodiesel at its Houston location exclusively for World Energy in North America. DHCP will source the raw materials and produce biodiesel fuel to World Energy's exacting specifications under the agreement. "Manufacturing biodiesel for World Energy is yet another example of how Dow is using its capabilities to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and improve energy efficiency through a variety of means, including the advancement of alternative forms of energy, ranging from fuel cell technology to renewable feedstocks," said Simon Upfill-Brown, general manager of Dow Haltermann Custom Processing. "We are, therefore, pleased to leverage the operations expertise of our custom processing division to provide World Energy with the world-class production necessary to enable the continued growth of the biodiesel market." The use of biodiesel reduces carbon monoxide emissions by 78 percent compared to petroleum diesel, according to a 1998 biodiesel lifecyle study jointly sponsored by the US Department of Energy and the US Department of Agriculture. Integrating biodiesel is very efficient, requiring little, if any, engine adjustments and utilizing existing infrastructure. Many public and private organizations are currently using World Energy biodiesel, including all branches of the U.S. military, Harvard University, utility fleets and many school bus systems around the country. At a B20 blend in diesel engines (20 percent biodiesel and 80 percent petroleum diesel - the most common), these groups and their communities are enjoying a 16 percent reduction in carbon dioxide emissions; a 21 percent reduction in unburned hydrocarbons; an 11 percent reduction in carbon monoxide; and a 10 percent reduction in particulate matter. World Energy created and is the most experienced company in the development, production and supply chain fulfillment of all-climate biodiesel. The company has grown rapidly as demand for alternative fuels, particularly biodiesel, has intensified. Biodiesel fuel is gaining proponents by the day as consumers look for an answer to surging petroleum prices and government officials look for a means to reduce oil consumption and, therefore, the need for imported oil. "As the leader in the biodiesel fuel industry, it is our responsibility to meet our nation's energy needs, now and in the future," said Gebolys. "We will continue to seek out top-tier companies like Dow Haltermann to join us in ensuring America always has available an abundant and dependable supply of energy." "We are excited to be teamed with the leader in the U.S. biodiesel market," said Upfill-Brown. "Producing biodiesel fits our existing asset base, as well as Dow's commitment to be part of the solution for climate change."
 

JHZR2

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Biodiesel is a great thing... One of the fuels of the future. I still prefer the direct reformation of non-nutritious sugars as my favorite eco-friendly technology. That is neat technology... The reformation runs at low temperature, and matches nicely to a water-gas shift, so its carbon neutral, easy to thermally integrate, and provides hydrogen / H2+CO blend for residential fuel cells and grid augmentation. Between that and biodiesel for cars, things would be looking up in the world of energy. Too bad that there is too high an ester content in biodiesel to reform easily, then it really would be the wonderfuel of the future. JMH
 
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I like the idea of biodiesel to augment fosil fuels, particularly as the lubricity drops with the new eco-friendly diesel fuels. Rest assured, as soon as B20 hits the region, I'll be buying it (helps farmers, helps greenhouse, helps injector pumps, and helps engine cleanliness)
 
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quote:
I still prefer the direct reformation of non-nutritious sugars as my favorite eco-friendly technology. That is neat technology... The reformation runs at low temperature, and matches nicely to a water-gas shift, so its carbon neutral, easy to thermally integrate, and provides hydrogen / H2+CO blend for residential fuel cells and grid augmentation.
Is there a link somewhere with more info on this? I would like to learn more.
 

JHZR2

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virent energy systems Aqueous phase reforming. http://www.virent.com/technology.htm Full disclosure: I am a Chemical Engineer working for the Federal Government (DoD/Navy) and have no interest in any company in any way. My sole purpose of discussing this technology was the interest of eco-derived energy sources, and the interesting process which this company is developing. JMH
 
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cit1991, can you weigh in on this discussion or are you specifically dealing with gasoline applications ? Thanks for the links fellas. Are there any applications for bio formulated or augmented Aviation Jet fuels ? Terry
 
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Terry, there was a good article in New Scientist a while back about biodiesel (methyl esters) being used for air transport. Basically, like cold filtering beer, the esters were dropped to low temperature, and the stuff filtered. Lowered the pour point, and improved some properties. Undergoing testing on land based engines at present. Next part of the concept was that the passengers could choose to "fly biofuels", by purchasing a plane ticket to fly on dino, bio, or a percentage. They reckoned that there was enough interest that passengers would cover the increased costs of running 10% bio.
 
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Sudbury, Ontario
I went down to my cities Public Transit yard a couple days ago and found the guy who's dealing with our buses running BioDiesel. They are using B20 during the summer and B5 during the winter. A couple things you guys might be interested in hearing is that they only mix it with fuel No. 1 and they are concerned about new Canadian NOX laws coming into effect in 2007. The No. 1 fuel is supposed to produce less hp and less polution so they don't bother with No. 2 during the summer(they stopped drag racing their busses competitively a few years ago [Razz] ). I think part of the NOX problem is due to the fact that they didn't do anything to the buses before running Bio. They are now trying to figure out what kind of catalytic converter they should be using but they said that if they don't get the thing matched perfectly with the engine it will create more NOX while reducing CO. I learned a lot more than I expected from the guy. I just happened to see a dumptruck with a biodiesel sticker on it so I drove down to the town yard (I own a diesel and wanted to know how I could get some bio). The secretary pointed me in the right direction and I ended up taking half an hour of the guys time and he was showing me prices on the fuel and offering me photocopies of stuff. Cheers, Steve
 
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Arizona
The only trouble with biodiesels that come from agricultural commodities (like ethanol fuels, for example) is that no one seems to think about the fact that we're mining a vastly more valuable resource this way than we are by drilling for oil. By removing all the organic matter from a field, the topsoil is being effectively mined. As we strip the OM from the soil it becomes less productive; the microscopic flora and fauna needed are eliminated. The soil erodes more readily and to a greater degree. We have to mine and drill even harder for the geological inputs to make synthetic fertilizers so that we can grow lots more plant material so that we can turn it back into a fuel. I really like the surface idea of biofuels, but when you start thinking it a little further through it seems like we're wasting a lot of effort and doing damage in the process.
 
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