Amsoil bypass on a 2009 F-150 w/5.4

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98
Location
KS
I would like to use the BMK23-EA,anyone got any suggestions as to pro's and con's of this on this application?
 
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18,449
Location
East of IGO
To be honest bypass filters on gasoline engines really benefit the person who sold it to you.Gasoline engines do not need a bypass filter. What about warranty? I would bet the engine will with proper maintenance outlast your ownership of the truck. But and there is always a but if you are greatly extending oil change intervals and do the work to make the process work have fun.
 
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39,806
Location
Pottstown, PA
 Originally Posted By: djquik1
I would like to use the BMK23-EA,anyone got any suggestions as to pro's and con's of this on this application?
Pro's: Cleaner oil ..extended drains ... Con's: Up front costs ..finding the location for easy service. That's the short list.
 

djquik1

Thread starter
Messages
98
Location
KS
 Originally Posted By: Steve S
To be honest bypass filters on gasoline engines really benefit the person who sold it to you.Gasoline engines do not need a bypass filter. What about warranty? I would bet the engine will with proper maintenance outlast your ownership of the truck. But and there is always a but if you are greatly extending oil change intervals and do the work to make the process work have fun.
I work at a Ford dealership and the warranty will be ok.I checked with my regional rep and he said he didn't see a problem with it.I would be doing the work myself.
 

dnewton3

Staff member
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8,459
Location
Indianapolis, IN
I echo Gary's comments. But I have to add some of my own ... If you "want" a bypass system because you like to tinker, and you think they are "cool", and a conversation piece, then by all means get one. But if you think you're going to add any longevity to the vehicle, you're mistaken. You certainly can add to the longevity of the lubricant. I highly suspect you're like 99.9% of the rest of the masses, in that you'll trade, sell, or total (wreck) the truck long before you'd ever wear it out. It's likely that engine could easily go 250k miles (probably longer) on dino fluids changed every 5k miles with a conventional store-bought filter. If you really want to know just how well bypass filtration "protects" an engine, do us all a favor. Run some pre and post installation UOAs. Run conventional oil/filters for 25k miles, doing an OCI/UOA every 5k miles. Then change over to the bypass system, and do the same thing. I doubt you'd see UOA results show wear metal reductions anywhere near the ROI cost equivilant. In other words, if you end up spending 3x the money for an OCI (cost of system ammoritized, more fluids used, higher cost of filters, etc), do you get 3x less wear? 3x better TBN retention? 3x better anything? Highly doubtful. Bypass filtration and synthetic fluids are awesome tools for extending the life of lubricants; they are a fiscal savings tool. They must be used in concert with extended OCIs to pay off. If you use them in "normal" OCI durations, they do little to nothing to add service life to mechanical things, especially if you would not normally operate that equipment past it's "normal" lifespan anyway ...
 
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djquik1

Thread starter
Messages
98
Location
KS
 Originally Posted By: dnewton3
I echo Gary's comments. But I have to add some of my own ... If you "want" a bypass system because you like to tinker, and you think they are "cool", and a conversation piece, then by all means get one. But if you think you're going to add any longevity to the vehicle, you're mistaken. You certainly can add to the longevity of the lubricant. I highly suspect you're like 99.9% of the rest of the masses, in that you'll trade, sell, or total (wreck) the truck long before you'd ever wear it out. It's likely that engine could easily go 250k miles (probably longer) on dino fluids changed every 5k miles with a conventional store-bought filter. If you really want to know just how well bypass filtration "protects" an engine, do us all a favor. Run some pre and post installation UOAs. Run conventional oil/filters for 25k miles, doing an OCI/UOA every 5k miles. Then change over to the bypass system, and do the same thing. I doubt you'd see UOA results show wear metal reductions anywhere near the ROI cost equivilant. In other words, if you end up spending 3x the money for an OCI (cost of system ammoritized, more fluids used, higher cost of filters, etc), do you get 3x less wear? 3x better TBN retention? 3x better anything? Highly doubtful. Bypass filtration and synthetic fluids are awesome tools for extending the life of lubricants; they are a fiscal savings tool. They must be used in concert with extended OCIs to pay off. If you use them in "normal" OCI durations, they do little to nothing to add service life to mechanical things, especially if you would not normally operate that equipment past it's "normal" lifespan anyway ...
I plan on keeping this truck for 15-20 years.....That is the only reason we traded the 2008 in....It is a bigger cab that suits our family better. I plan on using Schaeffer's 7000 series and using the Amsoil EAO filters for the life of the vehicle.Currently I plan on doing a UOA at 6k to see where I am at and go from there
 

dnewton3

Staff member
Messages
8,459
Location
Indianapolis, IN
OK - I'm going to have to play devil's advocate for a moment here. So, did you purposely buy the 2008 vehicle, knowing that you'd take a big hit in depreciation, so that you could turn around and buy the 2009? I find that hard to believe. And, regardless of you intentions, the facts bear the fruit of my comments; what makes you think this 2009 will be with you 15 years from now? What I think is more than likely is that you'll have the 2009 for anywhere from 3-7 years, and then it will be gone. That is BY FAR the most historical trend in the auto industry. And let's not forget that things like a wreck can change your plan without your consent. How many miles will you drive the truck in a year? It's certainly possible that high annual mileage could benefit your use of bypass filtration, but then I already acknowledged that fact. But if you're going to do the "average" of 12.5k, you'd have to drive it 20 years, JUST TO GET TO 250K MILES. And there is every reason to think that the 5.4L engine can go that far with routine filters and dino oils every 5k miles. Hey - I'm not trying to talk you out of it. I'm just trying to get you to look at it logically. It's OK to make an emotional purchase; just admit it, and don't try to convince yourself, or others, that it will pay off with vehicle longevity. It could pay off in spades for lubricant longevity, if you can resist the urge to OCI frequenty.
 

djquik1

Thread starter
Messages
98
Location
KS
 Originally Posted By: dnewton3
OK - I'm going to have to play devil's advocate for a moment here. So, did you purposely buy the 2008 vehicle, knowing that you'd take a big hit in depreciation, so that you could turn around and buy the 2009? I find that hard to believe. And, regardless of you intentions, the facts bear the fruit of my comments; what makes you think this 2009 will be with you 15 years from now? What I think is more than likely is that you'll have the 2009 for anywhere from 3-7 years, and then it will be gone. That is BY FAR the most historical trend in the auto industry. And let's not forget that things like a wreck can change your plan without your consent. How many miles will you drive the truck in a year? It's certainly possible that high annual mileage could benefit your use of bypass filtration, but then I already acknowledged that fact. But if you're going to do the "average" of 12.5k, you'd have to drive it 20 years, JUST TO GET TO 250K MILES. And there is every reason to think that the 5.4L engine can go that far with routine filters and dino oils every 5k miles.
I will give you some background on me.I work for a Ford/Mazda dealership.I bought the 2008 because my 1997 F-150 regular cab had a failing transmission.It did not meet the needs of having a step son and a fiancee.We bought a Supercab 2008 because of the back seat.Well my step son has gone through 2 growth spurts and is almost as tall as his mother at age 7.We decided to upgrade.....After all was said and done I lost $400 real money to upgrade to the 2009.I paid $20,700 on my 2008 and got actual cash value of $20,300 for it. Mileage wise I am driving a lot more in the 2009.The truck will be of dual purpose as a family hauler and I use it for pulling the boat and the race car.It will probably see about 15-25K a year for miles,so the extended OCI and lowering my expenses is a big factor to me. Now the wreck aspect,A good friend of mine owns a body shop and we swap labor all the time(I used to be a tech),I currently work in the parts dept.....So if it gets wrecked it will be put back together unless it is bad. Now with that knowledge are you understanding where i am coming from on justifying this upgrade?
 
Messages
1,335
Location
Arizona
If you want to install a bypass I say why not. Just go for it. Although I think you would be better served upgrading the transmission with bypass filtration instead of the engine. At the type of mileage you will be seeing the tranny is the real weak link here.
 

dnewton3

Staff member
Messages
8,459
Location
Indianapolis, IN
If you're going to run 15k - 25k miles a year, I'd say you're a candidate for bypass. Here are a few suggestions. 1) Stick with one oil; it simplifies data analysis 2) Get a Fumoto valve for the pan, and use it for the convenience of oil sampling. This will give you a sense of tinkering, while removing the temptation to OCI just because you're bored. You can UOA every 5k miles; that ought to keep you busy 3) Once you install the BP filter, use the UOAs along the way to establish your ranges and any trends. You can ignore some of the "break in" noise for the first 10-15k miles or so. 4) Enjoy the savings of bypass, and show the rest of the world just how true lubricant management is supposed to work.
 

djquik1

Thread starter
Messages
98
Location
KS
 Originally Posted By: AzFireGuy79
If you want to install a bypass I say why not. Just go for it. Although I think you would be better served upgrading the transmission with bypass filtration instead of the engine. At the type of mileage you will be seeing the tranny is the real weak link here.
Any suggestions to a kit for that?
 
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