Ageing of Trailer tires, Goodyear Endurance.

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Jul 16, 2020
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I have a 25' gooseneck horse trailer, most recent of many, and I have usually kept my tires 3-4 years before replacing. Now on my second set of Goodyear Endurance E rated and I'm very impressed. What is "your" recommendations for how long I should keep these on my trailer that gets about 8-9000 miles of towing yearly?? My first set looked almost new after three years, and I'm through 2 years on the second set and they also look new. What are "your" guidelines as to when to renew?? Thanks.
 
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I think your 3-4 year method is good practice. I'm one of those guys that try to mitigate risks any way I can. I'm sure those tires would last longer without an issue, but why take any chances to find out..
 

CKN

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I would agree that 3 to 4 years gives you a safety factor-as long as your sidewalls show no signs of dry rot from sitting. I don't get quite that long from my TT tires as I get same nasty direct sun. Tire covers won't stay on.
 
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OP, a little more information would go a long way in improving the quality of the responses you get. Such as where are you located, and where does the trailer see its use and what seasons? How heavily loaded and what percent of the maximum weight rating of the tires?

Tires used near full rated load used in a hot state like Arizona or Texas all summer are not going to last as long as tires lightly loaded in a cooler state.

Without detailed info replies are just a guess.
 
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Tires used near full rated load used in a hot state like Arizona or Texas all summer are not going to last as long as tires lightly loaded in a cooler state.
This. The part of the country you're in definitely plays a part.
 

wilnis123

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I live in Iowa and most of my traveling is to Missouri, South Dakota, Locally, and then going to Az in October where it sits for 5 months with covers on the tires and back to Iowa in April.
Thanks for your replies so far!
It does have covers on the wheels/tires when it sits everywhere.
Usually goes with 3 horses, and food/clothes for 3 days to Az and back, and 2 horses to Missouri or S. Dakota with 3-7 days of food for us and the animals.
I believe empty weight is approx 8000#, so I'd guess loaded with 3 horses, etc would not exceed 8500#, but that is only 2 times per year and travel is 1500mi each time with moderate weather.
 
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I believe empty weight is approx 8000#, so I'd guess loaded with 3 horses, etc would not exceed 8500#, but that is only 2 times per year and travel is 1500mi each time with moderate weather.
Ah ..... Mmmm ....... Empty weight is 8000# and loaded is 8500#, so each horse weighs 500#? Not to mention equipment?

This doesn't sound right.

Also, how did you originally determine replacing every 3 to 4 years? That might be an indicator of severe operating conditions.

Plan of action?

You're 2 years into a 3 to 4 year replacement cycle. That cycle length seems to have worked in the past. The question you are posing is can you change to a longer cycle ?

Good news!! You have plenty of time to figure this out.

The next trip, measure your pressure build up:

Measure and record the pressure and ambient temperature immediately before starting out for a long haul. After an hour to an hour and a half, stop and measure the pressure and ambient temperature. You do NOT want to see more than 10% pressure buildup, excluding ambient temperature effects.

Ambient temperature effects: Pressure changes 2% for every 10°F in ambient temperature.

If you see more than 10% pressure build up, you need to do something - increase load carrying capacity by either increasing inflation pressure or changing to a larger tire size.

If you see more than 15%, you need to take action IMMEDIATELY! Slowing down is the first step, followed by increasing tire load carrying capacity when you get a chance. We're talking within the week, not months!

You should repeatedly measure the pressure buildup to be sure you have a handle on it.
 

wilnis123

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Jul 16, 2020
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Thanks for your reply, my error, loaded weight is about 12,000# with 3 horses at about 1000# each and about 1000# of clothes, etc, I will weigh it next time it is loaded which will be in 2 weeks. Three year interval was recommended by a trailer dealer when we originally started pulling gooseneck trailers. Appreciate the directions about measuring tire pressure while driving and things to do. Tires are e rated and carry 80# pressure when I leave home They are 235/80/16 which is the original equipment size it came with. Again, I appreciate your reply and recommendations.
 
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