Advice on sealing wooden Carriage House (garage) doors

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My parents have large double swinging "carriage house" doors on their bedroom.

They were un-hung and refinished a few years ago by Dad, new weather stripping. It's leaking now; the water is coming down the face of the door, pooling, then coming through the seal and wicking into the flooring and up the door as pictured. We have three days of dry weather I can open them up and do some temporary sealing until summer when we can un-hang them again, touch up the finish and replace the weatherstripping/gasket, etc. (the silver in the pic is some added insulation for winter - it's behind a roll-top desk and curtains so hidden).

What would you do?

I was thinking just lay a bead of something like DAP 230, which would make a seal and then be easy to break in the spring and clean up. I don't know if that's the best idea so thought I'd seek some options and advice.

IMG-3229.JPG



Doors in question, requisite automotive content included:

IMG-3237.jpg
 
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This is wind-blown water hitting the doors and pooling, right?

No issues with the gutters leaking in the area over those doors?
 

Oro_O

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This is wind-blown water hitting the doors and pooling, right?

No issues with the gutters leaking in the area over those doors?

Correct. The gutters work great, have anti-clog inserts that work very well. This is just water hitting the door and running down, as the eaves are high above it, not large, and that side of the house is fully exposed. I stood outside last night in a very heavy rain to observe and make certain. The water is quite clearly coming in via the bottom seal and then wicking up the wood. There's not really any standing water outside, but there's enough run-off from the door itself that it keeps a little film there all the time when it's raining steadily - which is a lot in the PNW in winter. ;)
 

Oro_O

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DAP also makes a sealant called SEAL N' PEEL
I've bought it at Home Depot and used it around the exterior of windows during Winter.
Adheres good and in Spring time, just peel off.

DAP® SEAL N' PEEL REMOVABLE WEATHERSTRIP SEALANT, CRYSTAL CLEAR, 10.1 OZ. CARTRIDGE 3560065 - Walmart.com - Walmart.com
Ok, so the advantage of that would be that it's easier to remove than, say, 230 or another weather stripping? Which sounds good since It'll get opened and addressed in the summer.
 

Oro_O

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I like the peel n' seal - my idea was to open the doors, lay a bead along the base and then up 8". Then shut the doors and let it seal. The peel aspect will make it easy to remove in the summer. There is both an Ace and a Home depot in town so one will have it - looks like HD carries it.
"
 
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It looks like the driveway is level and not sloping away from the doors.

A trench drain might be a good investment here.
 
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Those look like out swinging doors. Those are hard to keep from leaking. Also examine I'f there is proper flashing and drip cap installed.
 

Oro_O

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I mentioned using DAP Seal 'n Peel / it peals off like a rubber band.
Some times it's difficult to find in Stores.

How about using Caulk Rope ?
Frost King 1/8 in. x 90 ft. Rope Caulk Wood Tone-B2WT - The Home Depot

Ad shows:
Caulk stays flexible so it can be removed.

Actually, you're right it's not so easy to come by. HD doesn't have it and Ace can't get it for a week. Any alternatives?

The driveway slopes and drains adequately. The issue is just the run-off from the door that pools before draining.
 
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It seems that you need to shorten the door a bit and add a sealed threshold as a dam to keep the water out.

I don't think that I have ever seen a bedroom with a wide door that opens to a vehicle parking area. Did this room used to be a garage?
 

Oro_O

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It seems that you need to shorten the door a bit and add a sealed threshold as a dam to keep the water out.

I don't think that I have ever seen a bedroom with a wide door that opens to a vehicle parking area. Did this room used to be a garage?

It was done that way intentionally to make a larger "guest house" on the property and stay within the zoning laws. As long as the doors open and a vehicle can be pulled in, the square footage there doesn't count against the limit for "guest" house. Local R-5 zoning laws allow one main house and one guest house.

So that was the reason and why putting up with the hassle of a little extra maintenance every few years is worth it.
 
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It was done that way intentionally to make a larger "guest house" on the property and stay within the zoning laws. As long as the doors open and a vehicle can be pulled in, the square footage there doesn't count against the limit for "guest" house. Local R-5 zoning laws allow one main house and one guest house.

So that was the reason and why putting up with the hassle of a little extra maintenance every few years is worth it.
That is interesting, I was also a little confused about those doors being in a bedroom. My county doesn’t have any zoning so that wasn’t something I thought about here. That’s a neat loophole.
 
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I read the title as the carriage house (aka the garage) needed the doors sealed.

The old old old houses in town have matching garages aka carriage houses where the horses used to stay before cars. Some of the prettiest old houses in the area IMO.
 
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I don't like the angle of the gutter. Looks like a low spot centered over the door. I'd have a splash guard in the corner where the valley comes down also.
I do like the MK 8 Intech hotrod Lincoln.
 

Oro_O

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It seems that you need to shorten the door a bit and add a sealed threshold as a dam to keep the water out.

I don't think that I have ever seen a bedroom with a wide door that opens to a vehicle parking area. Did this room used to be a garage?

My dad said he replaced the threshold with mahogany and rebuilt everything a few years ago. However, what you mention about raising it is probably the long-term answer. We can do that this coming summer.
 
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