Advantages of Rust Proofing

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So here is the underneath of my Hyundai Santa Fe with almost 200K KM (120K miles) on it with a yearly application from Krown Rust Control oil spray. It's solvent free and environmentally friendly. I posted the pics to show the importance of regular oil spray and how it keeps things looking like new and easy to work on.
 

StevieC

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 Originally Posted By: rszappa1
A lot of what I see could be done in your garage with a few cans of rustproofing in a can....
While I agree the underneath could be done by yourself,I disagree that it can all be done by yourself. It's not just the underneath of the car that they spray. They spray the insides of the doors, body panels and roof using drilled holes and long metal pipes that go deep inside to make sure all areas are sprayed with a generous oil coating which displaces moisture and stops it from reacting with metal surfaces. Unfortunately I can't take pictures of that nor can I spray these inside areas with a couple of cans in my driveway. Rust on your body panels, doors and roof starts from the inside out. ;\)
 
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it is a great idea for those of us who live in cold climes with dreaded salt trucks
 
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 Originally Posted By: StevieC
 Originally Posted By: rszappa1
A lot of what I see could be done in your garage with a few cans of rustproofing in a can....
While I agree the underneath could be done by yourself,I disagree that it can all be done by yourself. It's not just the underneath of the car that they spray. They spray the insides of the doors, body panels and roof using drilled holes and long metal pipes that go deep inside to make sure all areas are sprayed with a generous oil coating which displaces moisture and stops it from reacting with metal surfaces. Unfortunately I can't take pictures of that nor can I spray these inside areas with a couple of cans in my driveway. Rust on your body panels, doors and roof starts from the inside out. ;\)
This sounds like a complete and total violation of my vehicle. Something I'll never have done.
 
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 Originally Posted By: StevieC
Krown Rust Control oil spray
Does this stuff remain sticky, or does it dry to the touch? Is it sort of waxy?
 
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 Originally Posted By: chevrofreak
 Originally Posted By: StevieC
 Originally Posted By: rszappa1
A lot of what I see could be done in your garage with a few cans of rustproofing in a can....
While I agree the underneath could be done by yourself,I disagree that it can all be done by yourself. It's not just the underneath of the car that they spray. They spray the insides of the doors, body panels and roof using drilled holes and long metal pipes that go deep inside to make sure all areas are sprayed with a generous oil coating which displaces moisture and stops it from reacting with metal surfaces. Unfortunately I can't take pictures of that nor can I spray these inside areas with a couple of cans in my driveway. Rust on your body panels, doors and roof starts from the inside out. ;\)
This sounds like a complete and total violation of my vehicle. Something I'll never have done.
Yeah, I kinda have a problem with "drill holes in my car so I can squirt stuff in to keep out moisture which can now get in because I drilled holes in it to squirt stuff in to keep out moisture." Seems coumterintuitive to me IMHO. John
 

Bill in Utah

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We here in Utah have great resources for Salt (its quick and EASY/CHEAP) so we get a fair share of it on the roads. The bottom of my Corolla looks just as clean and its factory fresh. There are parts of the A arms that get sand blasted all the time and they have a little rust.... In fact, other than my 1983 Toyota SR5 (over 300k miles) which the bed rusted away and my 1986 Jetta (over 360k miles) which has MAJOR rust around the windsheild due to some IDIOT who replaced it all of the vehicles I've owned and sold to family and friends have been pretty free of rust unless they hit something and did not repair it. Frequent visits to the quarter car wash (I'll spray the car down at least once a week if I drive it in the salt for my commute) seems to have worked over the decades. Stevie I'm MORE CONCERNED with your jack point! I don't know if I'd be using that to jack up on... Be SAFE! (and don't bend the frame parts!) Bill
 
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I use 3M Rustfighter in the door panels, etc., as well as the dealer applied rubberized undercoating in the open areas. Hardly ever see an old import or early 90's Blazer around here with sides still on it. They spray brine when it even looks like it might snow.
 

StevieC

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 Originally Posted By: chet2
i like the pic of your dog...mans best friend no doubt
That he is... But He's my friends dog who we adopted because his wife is allergic to him unfortunately. He has really grown to like us though.
 Originally Posted By: moribundman
 Originally Posted By: StevieC
Krown Rust Control oil spray
Does this stuff remain sticky, or does it dry to the touch? Is it sort of waxy?
It's greasy to the touch, but is very hard to wipe off with a cloth.
 Originally Posted By: John_K
Yeah, I kinda have a problem with "drill holes in my car so I can squirt stuff in to keep out moisture which can now get in because I drilled holes in it to squirt stuff in to keep out moisture." Seems coumterintuitive to me IMHO. John
I wish I could show you pictures of my 20 year old Caravan that went to the scrap yard with the body looking like new. This too had holes drilled into it so they could spray oil and then capped with plastic caps. The van went to the scrap because of an electrical fire under the hood at 400K KM.
 Originally Posted By: Bill in Utah
... Stevie I'm MORE CONCERNED with your jack point! I don't know if I'd be using that to jack up on... Be SAFE! (and don't bend the frame parts!) Bill
It actually says "LIFT HERE" on it and on various other spots underneath the vehicle. I also use safety stands as well, just can't be seen in the pics. SAFETY ALWAYS FIRST!
 Originally Posted By: river_rat
I use 3M Rustfighter in the door panels, etc., as well as the dealer applied rubberized undercoating in the open areas.
Rubberized is bad. It holds moisture in and doesn't re-pell it. Read about Ziebarts old coating system and you will see cars that rotted because of it.
 
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 Originally Posted By: StevieC
Rubberized is bad. It holds moisture in and doesn't re-pell it. Read about Ziebarts old coating system and you will see cars that rotted because of it.
Tell that to my forty year old VW. When it flakes off from age, it's shiny paint under there. So I touch it up. It must be maintained. Ziebart's problem is in the sloppy prep and application--not the product.
 

StevieC

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river_rat, thanks for posting that. I was always under the assumption that rubberized was bad because it held the moisture, but it would appear that you have real proof that it doesn't. I will stick with the oil spray because not only does it achieve the same level of moisture displacement protection but it also keeps rubber bushings, CV boots and brake hoses from drying out and keeps all the fasteners easy to take off because there isn't rust accumulation. It also runs & seeps into the metal folds/seems where a rubberized application may not be able to get into due to its thickness or might not be able to be a applied due to inability to access. Plus I also never had a problem with a window regulator or mechanism going bad or breaking because I think the rust proofing oil spray keeps the window parts well lubricated. This is a real plus because window regulators can be quite expensive to replace and a PITA. My locks and windows have never frozen up on any vehicle even after 20 years of age! ;\) I think there is many advantages of an oil spray and not just the moisture displacement rustproofing properties.
 
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 Originally Posted By: StevieC
I think there is many advantages of an oil spray and not just the moisture displacement rustproofing properties.
I agree, but the rust warranty went from five years to ten years if I had the rubberized undercoating applied at the dealer, so I had to go for it. I'm covered under rust-through warranty until 2017 and I'm not required to take it back for inspection or retreatments to be covered. The rubberized may also prevent rock chips better. That, and in my own experience, is that the rubberized is waterproof. However, it can flake and become a water trap if it is not maintained. I do check for flaking periodically, as when it gets very old, it can become brittle as on the VW. Right now on the truck, with the dealer applied undercoating, it is still gooey and flexible after more than two years. When I questioned the local Ziebart about how they were going to apply rustproofing/undercoating on my last truck, they told me they pressure wash the undercarriage before they apply it, and would have the car back to me in 2-3 hours. Then I asked them how they dried it off before applying it, and the said they put a fan under there. I declined having them do it because I couldn't imagine all the water being gone from every nook and crack before they sprayed right over it and having the car back in 2-3 hours. This was in the fall, too, If I recall. I think they are a volume business and just want to move the cars through. My opinion. On the truck I have now, it was still new and clean and there was no washing required. I went back with them and watched them apply it to my satisfaction.
 
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PS: I have yet to rub any of it off the truck Baja'ing through the weeds to pick up dead deer. So I'm happy with it. Like I say though, when I got home I applied 3M to the inner parts myself, and it is a waxy-oily clear stuff that stays tacky.
 

StevieC

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If the cold makes it brittle, then it would definitely be a problem up here in the winter and exposed to the heaps of road salt they dump on our roads, even when they "think" it's gonna snow... As for the warranty, my truck came with a 10 year unlimited mileage anti-perforation warranty from Hyundai that isn't voided by adding the drilling holes for rust-proofing oil spray as I checked before I had it done. Plus if you get your vehicle sprayed each year from Krown from when the vehicle is new, they will cover the entire vehicle with their warranty and pay for any damage that may occur due to rust.
 

OVERKILL

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 Originally Posted By: John_K
 Originally Posted By: chevrofreak
 Originally Posted By: StevieC
 Originally Posted By: rszappa1
A lot of what I see could be done in your garage with a few cans of rustproofing in a can....
While I agree the underneath could be done by yourself,I disagree that it can all be done by yourself. It's not just the underneath of the car that they spray. They spray the insides of the doors, body panels and roof using drilled holes and long metal pipes that go deep inside to make sure all areas are sprayed with a generous oil coating which displaces moisture and stops it from reacting with metal surfaces. Unfortunately I can't take pictures of that nor can I spray these inside areas with a couple of cans in my driveway. Rust on your body panels, doors and roof starts from the inside out. ;\)
This sounds like a complete and total violation of my vehicle. Something I'll never have done.
Yeah, I kinda have a problem with "drill holes in my car so I can squirt stuff in to keep out moisture which can now get in because I drilled holes in it to squirt stuff in to keep out moisture." Seems coumterintuitive to me IMHO. John
The doors have drains in the bottom of them from the factory. Adding another hole isn't going to "let moisture in". The vast majority of areas that are sprayed are already susceptible to moisture anyways. Up here in the "Great White North" it is pretty easy to distinguish the vehicles that get sprayed from those that don't.
 
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