Adv/disadvantages HDMO in light duty use

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OK, The advantages of running a HDMO such as Chevron Delo 10w30 is greater degergent and higher antiwear additives, namely ZDDP. But I was wondering if there are any disadvantages to this. Perhaps there are. In browsing the Redline Oil site they stated the following: "The diesel engine oils contain significantly greater detergency and total base number (TBN) which helps keep the engine clean. This additional detergency is not recommended for gasoline engines since it could increase the tendency for spark plug fouling." (Redline Website, Our Products, Drain Intervals) What do you all think? If true, maybe we could mix half Delo and half Valvoline VR1 Racing Oil, which is high in ZDDP, but has reduced detergents, to get an oil with about the same detergent as PCMO, but higher ZDDP.
 
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If you mixed those two oils together you would most likely be mixing a ashless detergent/dispersant package " VR-1 " with a unknown D/D package of the Chevron. Don't think that would play out well in the long run time after time for best performance.Might get lucky though . [Wink] The VR1 has much less than the 2k PPM of zinc it had yesteryear anyway . More like 1100 or so . If you want a HDEO in a 30wt suggest looking for a SJ which will be in the 1.2-1.3 ash range "approximatley" or there are other SL's and SJ's that are .9 -1.1 out there. Good luck in your search . [ December 05, 2003, 03:50 PM: Message edited by: Motorbike ]
 
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I would only think it would be bad for the plugs if it's getting to them from blowby. There are many people that run HD oils in gas engines and in fact I posted a topic similar to this a few weeks ago. I think it's the way to go. I've heard that most Mobil engineers run Delvac 1 in there cars. Better detergency and more ZDDP. Better base stock too. [Wink]
 

TallPaul

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Valvoline's website lists VR1 as having 0.137% zinc and 0.125% phosphorus. But this is interesting: I just discovered that Valvoline All-Climate is different in the 15w40 version. Very similar to All-Fleet 15w40 and with 0.16% zinc. Also a HTHS of 4.0. Sounds like pretty tough stuff. It is listed under PCMOs at the website and is rated SJ. I won't be using it, though, as it appears that it only comes in 50 gal drums. Also, I need a 40 wt to maintain oil pressure in spec (low 40s with spec being 40-60), though it's not terrible with a 30 wt (about 36 psi hot at speed/ 16 at idle). But a 10w40 HDMO does not appear to exist and I don't think I want to run 15w in a Detroit winter, though some 15w40s have lower pour points than some 10w40s.
 
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<b>TallPaul</b>, I am not sure about now but I do know that as recently as about one year ago Valvoline All-Climate 15W-40 was available at AutoZone stores in both Florida and Nevada. In the past I used this oil in my 1999 Mitsubishi Mirage.
 
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I run CI-4/SL formulations in everything I have that can use a 15w-40 (Fords 5w30). My wife's BMW has about 6 years on the plugs without my even thinking about them. I guess IF anything builds up the Techron takes it off.
 
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quote:
Originally posted by TallPaul: Also, I need a 40 wt to maintain oil pressure in spec (low 40s with spec being 40-60), though it's not terrible with a 30 wt (about 36 psi hot at speed/ 16 at idle).
TallPaul You should not use a 40w if your engine requires 30w. The 40w will be to heavy for the size of oil galeries you have . The 40w will run hotter and you will have the same cst as a 30w. But with hotter oil. Your pressures sound good if you have a Ford.
 
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quote:
Originally posted by JonS:
quote:
Originally posted by TallPaul: Also, I need a 40 wt to maintain oil pressure in spec (low 40s with spec being 40-60), though it's not terrible with a 30 wt (about 36 psi hot at speed/ 16 at idle).
TallPaul You should not use a 40w if your engine requires 30w. The 40w will be to heavy for the size of oil galeries you have . The 40w will run hotter and you will have the same cst as a 30w. But with hotter oil. Your pressures sound good if you have a Ford.

I guess that's why the same engines built at the exact same plant specify 30 weight in the US and 50 weight or 40 weight elsewhere [Roll Eyes] And there are many UOA proving that 40 weight or even 50 weight in an application that warrents it's use, is absolutely fine, and even prefferable in some circumstances, like an old engine or high ambient temps. I've run 15w-40 LL penz in my Dad's 4.3L Blazer to keep oil pressure up and it performs great and actually improves fuel economy [Big Grin] Yea, 40 weight might not be good at the arctic circle!
 
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The only disadvantages I know of are that the 15W-40 might be too high viscosity unless the engine is being worked hard and hot--it'll lube OK but cost gas mileage for no real benefit. And, long term, the higher level of phosphorus may poison the catalytic converter sooner than an ILSAC GF-3 oil. Ken
 

Patman

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quote:
Originally posted by Robbie Alexander:
quote:
Originally posted by Ken2: cost gas mileage for no real benefit.
Yup the Gas. Hey what happened to my post... they have been vanishing

I'm not sure what is happening, we had a few bugs on the site yesterday and some errors were showing up, but none have occured today that I'm aware of.
 

TallPaul

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I'll keep an eye out for that AC 15w40. Of course I could always get Valvoline Premium Blue. Also plan to go to Motor City Truck-Ford/Sterling sometime to check out their oils and get some FleetGuard filters. I don't see where there is a problem running 10w40 in the pickup ('95 F150 4.9L), even though the owner's manual says 10w30 and allows 5w30 when below zero. My Haynes manual for this truck ('80-'96 has a chart that allows everything from straight 30 to 20w50 (in appropriate temperature ranges). Tollerances (variation on a surface) may be tighter, but clearances (distance between moving parts) are relatively unchanged. A 10w30 will act line a 40 weight somewhere below 100C and manages to get through the galleries OK. I guess the 36 psi is plenty, but I get a warm fuzzy feeling having it above 40, even though the 40 does stretch the oil a bit farther with VI improvers. As for good oil pressure for a Ford, my '90 460 V8 runs 70 psi cold, 58 hot at 2000 rpm, and 27 at idle hot. A 15w40 should be about the same at 100C as a 10w40, but will stand up to abuse better since it has less VI improvers and has a heavier base oil (as is apparent in the higher HTHS number on a 15w- vs a 10w- oil). So I think I'd really like to try this 15w40 stuff in the summer. When I drive it long and hard the pressure will drop a few pounds (sure wish I had a temp gauge to see what might be going on) and with a 15w- it may not do that--will see. I am a Maxlife user and may try mixing equal parts 10w40 and 20w50 to get a sort of 15w40 (albeit, pushing the upper end of the 40 grade range) and it would be a dumbell oil (no not to insult myself, but talking about a dumbell frequency curve to the oil molecule distrubution with two humps, one in the 10w range and the other in the 15w range). Anyway, it should be an interesting summer. [ December 07, 2003, 12:38 AM: Message edited by: TallPaul ]
 
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