A Schaeffer oil question

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Rome, Ga
To all those technical types, What kind of oil does Schaeffer blend in with the PAO's in the 7000 15w-40. They give a definition but to me it is Greek. All info is appreciated. Thanks in advance Greg H
 

GregH

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I just got another reply from Schaeffer about the paraffin base oil in their 7000 15w-40. How in the heck do they get such performance from 70% Group 1 and 30% PAO. I was under the impression that Group 1's are on the way out and are greatly inferior. I guess I learned something, but that is nothing new. GregH
 

Patman

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Schaeffer Oil proves time and time again that their oil can outperform many others simply with the fact that their additive package is so perfectly balanced, so it's base oil isn't quite as critical a factor, unless you're planning on doing 25k intervals.
 

GregH

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Thanks for the reply Patman, I guess sometimes we cannot see the forest for the trees. I would have thought that Premium Blend would have contained at least Group ll oils but who care as long as it works. I only intend on 100 hour intervals,factory numbers so I should be oday. Thanks again GregHarrison
 
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I'd like to offer this info to help explain just a little more on base stocks as this is where many people fail to understand and think that the base oil used, group whatever, qualifies the oil to be ok,better than ok, good, better than good, and best depending on what base stock that is used. INCORRECT. The different groups mentioned.. group I,II,III,IV,V and so on does NOT MEAN that one is better than the other. Base oils are classified as either Paraffinic Naphthenic Aromatic Synthetic These classification refer to the molecular structure of the base oil, not a measurement of which is better and best. In 94 a broad classification of base stocks was developed by the API for the purpose of creating guidelines and base oil read across performance for the licensing of engine oils. This was used to determine min engine testing requirements when substituting one base oil for another. This broad classification was used to identify the base stock by its composition and the methods used to refine or produce them. These classifications do not mean or imply that one group is better than the other. Certain aspects of a group I and group II are better for natural lubricity than a III or IV. Let's look at the Schaeffers 10w30 for example, #703 SUPREME 7000 SAE 10W-30 Solvent refined is mentioned- This helps increase the VI index, Also solvent refined base oils retain some of the natural antioxidants that are needed for good oxidation stability. Severely raffinate hydroconverted 100% paraffin base oils- This process is where they process the raffinates by placing it into a proprietary hydroconversion reactor that saturates the aromatic and naphathinic compounds into highly paraffinic molecules. Next the lube oil factions are stabilized and fractionated in a finishing reactor to further improve the base oils VI and volatility characteristics. The next step is the lube oil fractions undergo solvent dewaxing. After that, the final product is now a group II basestock of 105-120 Vi. Dewaxing is used to remove wax that is in waxy raffinates in order to improve the base oils low temp operability. Now add in polyalphaolefin (PAO) synthetic base fluids to the above. Now there is many positive things about this fluid in addition to the groups mentioned above that enhances even more the base properties of the other groups therefore you no longer are using just a group I or II but a special designer group mix that takes many different qualities of each group and makes a better than average base stock then you add in a highly specialized performance additive package and a highly shear stable viscosity index improver on top of the already good stable VI's, again enhancing the VI's from the 80-120 now to 150VI. As you can see, we no longer are looking at just a group I or II base oil but a base oil that's not even classified on here. Ok, last thing... Then add in a proven frictional modifier, Micron Moly®, a liquid soluble type of Moly that plates to the metal surfaces of the engine. Once plated, the Moly forms a long lasting barrier lubricant film, which prevents the metal surfaces from coming into contact with each other when hydrodynamic film property of the base oil shears. Ok, what does that do, well, by reducing friction because of inherent scuffing due to shearing of the hydrodynamic process, we now don't have near the heat demand on the base oil, so then we find we're not creating as much oxidation with the base oil due to excessive heat, where as those that don't use such, will have more heat stress therefore needs a higher level of base stock to resist the offset of heat. This combination has proven out in oil analysis to hold up as well as most all "full" synth's yet possesses better wear protection in many cases. This process is also used by several other specialized oil companies as well. So, now are you seeing how it's not the base oil itself by group but by the reformulation/additive chemistry that works together as one. To learn more on PAO and other base stocks, I have a page built for more reference.. Oil Basics about base stocks I hope this helps shed's some light on the group issue as many I believe are slightly confused on what it's really about. bob
 

Al

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Quote "The next step is the lube oil fractions undergo solvent dewaxing. After that, the final product is now a group II basestock of 105-120 Vi." I thought the 10W-30 was Group I ?? [ September 12, 2003, 04:25 PM: Message edited by: Al ]
 
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I don't think any multi-grade motor oil these days uses Group I base oil. Schaeffer #703 10W-30 synthetic blend oil doesn't state the base oil, but #306 non-syn 10W-30 does state that it is Group II+. Ken [ September 12, 2003, 09:13 PM: Message edited by: Ken2 ]
 

GregH

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[QUOTE]Originally posted by Ken2: [qb] I don't think any multi-grade motor oil these days uses Group I base oil. Schaeffer #703 10W-30 synthetic blend oil doesn't state the base oil, but #306 non-syn 10W-30 does state that it is Group II+. KEN2, Per Schaeffer Tech the 7000 15w-40 is indeed mostly group 1. WHo knows what we will learn next. GregH [ September 15, 2003, 08:09 AM: Message edited by: GregH ]
 
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Simpsonville SC
quote:
Originally posted by Ken2: I don't think any multi-grade motor oil these days uses Group I base oil. Schaeffer #703 10W-30 synthetic blend oil doesn't state the base oil, but #306 non-syn 10W-30 does state that it is Group II+. Ken
My Schaeffer rep called his tech about this same question regarding the 703. The chemist stated that the base is about 80% group II+ with the remaining 20% PAO.
 
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