5w40 HDEO vs 5w40 Euro.

Joined
Feb 6, 2021
Messages
486
Location
Massachusetts
Well it's been a fun, cheaply lubricated summer running 10w & 15w40, but inevitably here in the great white north, it will eventually be freezing cold again and I will have to go back to 5w (or 0w) oils. I'm sure this whole discussion is splitting hairs and my engine won't notice the difference but if you will entertain me a moment and offer up your opinions, what oil offers the greatest protection under extreme driving conditions, a 5w40 HDEO (with a gas engine rating) or a 5w40 Euro oil? Both cost about the same.

Car is a 2016 Hyundai Accent 1.6l GDI and will probably be at 170k+ by the time winter comes around. Driving conditions are a 50/50 mix of highway and city, non stop running for 8-12 hours at a time, severe traffic jams, slow driving in snow with some tire spinning to get unstuck for good measure, and stop and go with lots of idling. Oil will never be run more than 5k before dumping (typically once a month).
 
Joined
Aug 7, 2021
Messages
18
I'd use hdeo chevron delo 5w40 ... usually $20/gallon on wally world. My Nissan loved it for winter use.
Second place would be euro 5w40 .. pick your favorite, m1, castrol edge, valvolibe, qs euro.
Either way the car will be fine.
 
Joined
May 25, 2005
Messages
13,778
Location
ROCHESTER, NY
WOW!
Once-a-month oil changes/5K miles per month? Amazing and well done. :)
I can't help you with your oil choice but, I'd say to stick with what you're doing.
And changing your oil once per month, it probably doesn't matter which 40 grade oil you use however, there is an optimal one for your driving style/climate/situation that you've described above but, you may get 10 different answers including some non 40 grade recommendation

Best of luck,

CB
 
Joined
Dec 19, 2019
Messages
2,950
Location
Muncie, Indiana
I'd probably go with the Euro oil, it's been specifically tested and certified for extended drain intervals in gasoline engines, whereas HDEO has not/
 

Accent Abuser

Thread starter
Joined
Feb 6, 2021
Messages
486
Location
Massachusetts
I'd probably go with the Euro oil, it's been specifically tested and certified for extended drain intervals in gasoline engines, whereas HDEO has not/
Well, my thinking is HDEO is tested for extended intervals under even worse conditions than gas engines (higher heat, more soot, dirtier combustion etc). Even the conventional Valvoline 15w40 I'm using now has a TBN of 11.
 
Joined
Dec 19, 2019
Messages
2,950
Location
Muncie, Indiana
Well, my thinking is HDEO is tested for extended intervals under even worse conditions than gas engines (higher heat, more soot, dirtier combustion etc). Even the conventional Valvoline 15w40 I'm using now has a TBN of 11.
The average temp of the engine should be about the same with them both being water cooled, I'd think that gasoline engines would expose the oil to more extreme temperatures in hot spots, doesn't gasoline combustion tend to run hotter? Also when it comes to soot and extended drains on modern HD diesels, I think they have bypass filters in addition to two full flow filters as standard filtration equipment so the oil is pretty well scrubbed of soot.
 
Joined
May 21, 2018
Messages
2,688
Location
South Carolina
The average temp of the engine should be about the same with them both being water cooled, I'd think that gasoline engines would expose the oil to more extreme temperatures in hot spots, doesn't gasoline combustion tend to run hotter? Also when it comes to soot and extended drains on modern HD diesels, I think they have bypass filters in addition to two full flow filters as standard filtration equipment so the oil is pretty well scrubbed of soot.
No, diesel combustion temperatures are much higher.
Yes, most have a bypass filter usually called a "Luberfiner". When I worked on them years ago the the bypass filter was optional except on high end trucks (Pete, KW, etc).
No, there is only one full flow oil filter. There are, however, two fuel filters, a primary and secondary.

EDIT: Soot produced in diesel engine is different than soot produced in a gas engine. Both are carbon based but the differnet fuels produce a different product.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Y_K
Joined
Dec 11, 2006
Messages
343
Location
North Carolina, USA
This is an interesting question. First I'd like to know if API HEDO's are more in line with Euro (ACEA) A/B high saps or C catalyst/gpf/dpf oils. If HDEO's have a higher TBN then maybe the A/B stuff?

When I had the Passat Tdi, ACEA C was recommended, but HDEO's were suppose to be a no no.
 

Accent Abuser

Thread starter
Joined
Feb 6, 2021
Messages
486
Location
Massachusetts
This is an interesting question. First I'd like to know if API HEDO's are more in line with Euro (ACEA) A/B high saps or C catalyst/gpf/dpf oils. If HDEO's have a higher TBN then maybe the A/B stuff?

When I had the Passat Tdi, ACEA C was recommended, but HDEO's were suppose to be a no no.
I think it depends on the oil. Some are lower saps such as delo 600, Valvoline Premium Blue 15w40 (.9% probably to meet SP) etc. My car doesn't consume any oil and the intake is regularly cleaned so I'm not really concerned about ash content.
 

SR5

Joined
Jul 7, 2015
Messages
6,222
Location
Down Under
Both would be excellent, 5w40 HDEO or Euro 5W40 / 0W40.

But even if you go a Euro 5W40 you are still getting a diesel rated oil, A3 is for petrol (gas) while the B3 & B4 is for Diesel engines. All Euro rated oils are dual fuel rated. ACEA don’t allow you to claim only one, you must make the oil suitable for both fuels to claim the spec.

It would be nice to have a similar heavy duty gas (petrol) engine only oil, as then they could reduce the dispersant amount in the add pack, as diesel oils require more dispersants for their higher soot load, and this extra dispersant increases the Noack volatility when it’s not required for a regular gas (petrol) engine.

But splitting hairs here, both would work well. I’m more an A3/B4 sort of guy.
 
Top