5W-30 OK for Alaska in 2.8L GM Duramax?

Currently, it's -34 degs F in Whitehorse, YT and -41 degs F in Destruction Bay, YT. In low spots along the Al-Can Hwy, it's colder. EXTREME COLD WARNING A prolonged period of very cold wind chills is expected. A bitterly cold arctic ridge of high pressure will remain entrenched over the area for several days. Occasional light winds will give wind chill values below minus 45. ### Extreme cold puts everyone at risk. Please continue to monitor alerts and forecasts issued by Environment Canada. To report severe weather in British Columbia or Yukon, send an email to [email protected] or [email protected] or tweet reports using #BCStorm or #YTStorm. https://www.wunderground.com/severe/ca/whitehorse
 
I will post this hoping he gets it before heading out. I just completed this trip on the1/04/2020. this advise was given to me after it was to late only drive 37 in the summer it is not as well maintained as 97. Hwy 37 had places where the snow was built up 4 inches thick and there were holes through it to the pavement. There are more places to stop on 97 as well. I would also get some good maps as your gps and phones might not work and they are not always accurate. good luck and god speed from Fairbanks Jim
 
I have been to Alaska 3 times, have been over most of the road systems, and have a number of friends who live there. In my youth I was on a woodcutting crew in northern Ontario when temps reached as low as -54F. We did not work outside when temps hit -40F because there is a high risk of mechanical breakage. On the basis of my more "limited" knowledge the advice given is "on target." Starting a vehicle 1 time at -30F for a YouTube clip is NOT the same as starting a vehicle multiple mornings at that temp and expecting reliable operation all day. In fact those clips actually demonstrate how difficult it is to get a reliable start. What do you think their remaining battery voltage was after those starts? The draw on the batteries after a couple of these cold starts will significantly deplete the voltage and they will start to become weaker each time. You can't always count on a complete recharge from the alternator in a day's travel at these temps. Anyone who lives in these places always plugs in vehicles if they want them to last and be reliable. I hope the OP lets us know how everything went--and I wish them the best--and I hope they understand that adventures in these conditions can easily turn into a nightmare with one mechanical malfunction and then they will be completely at the mercy of those who are better equipped to find them and help them.
 
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Yea just found it also. Thanks. Looks like the pre-trip advice was spot on. I'd prefer my pre-emission 7.3 diesel for this trip over the new tier 4 emission crap.
 
Originally Posted by T-Stick
Yea just found it also. Thanks. Looks like the pre-trip advice was spot on. I'd prefer my pre-emission 7.3 diesel for this trip over the new tier 4 emission crap.
Yesiree! smile 20 years ago, I drove both late-90's 6.2L Chevy and 7.3L Ford diesel trucks in Prudhoe Bay (the North Slope) and never had troubles with either. Both were good trucks. In Anchorage, I drove a '87 F-250 Lariat with the International 6.9L. It was also a wonderful brute.
 
Originally Posted by rossn2
Has anyone else noticed the new GM 3.0 inline 6 diesel is calling for 7 quarts of 0-20W oil? I wonder how many of them will blow up...
I watched a YT video of a 3.0 towing a travel trailer and the oil temp was near 270F. That's too hot for thin oil like that.
 
Originally Posted by T-Stick
Yea just found it also. Thanks. Looks like the pre-trip advice was spot on. I'd prefer my pre-emission 7.3 diesel for this trip over the new tier 4 emission crap.
I had BMW X5 35d with that emission crap, and would start, drive etc. in -37c (that is as low as that car seen it) like it is mid summer outside. It is all about execution, and SCR system in BMW used numerous parts that other manufacturers used. So, I would say it is issue with execution in this vehicle.
 
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Originally Posted by edyvw
Originally Posted by T-Stick
Yea just found it also. Thanks. Looks like the pre-trip advice was spot on. I'd prefer my pre-emission 7.3 diesel for this trip over the new tier 4 emission crap.
I had BMW X5 35d with that emission crap, and would start, drive etc. in -37c (that is as low as that car seen it) like it is mid summer outside. It is all about execution, and SCR system in BMW used numerous parts that other manufacturers used. So, I would say it is issue with execution in this vehicle.
Does your Bimmer use DEF fluid and regeneration cycles?
 
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Originally Posted by rossn2
Has anyone else noticed the new GM 3.0 inline 6 diesel is calling for 7 quarts of 0-20W oil? I wonder how many of them will blow up...
Just make sure you use the appropriate oil. Just don't reach for any 0w20. It will likely be hard to find.
 
Originally Posted by T-Stick
Originally Posted by edyvw
Originally Posted by T-Stick
Yea just found it also. Thanks. Looks like the pre-trip advice was spot on. I'd prefer my pre-emission 7.3 diesel for this trip over the new tier 4 emission crap.
I had BMW X5 35d with that emission crap, and would start, drive etc. in -37c (that is as low as that car seen it) like it is mid summer outside. It is all about execution, and SCR system in BMW used numerous parts that other manufacturers used. So, I would say it is issue with execution in this vehicle.
Does your Bimmer use DEF fluid and regeneration cycles?
SCR system means DEF. In the case of X5, due to BMW focus on weight distribution there are two tanks, one under the hood, so called active tank (that tank utilized Bosch heater component, common on numerous vehicles and prone to failure, 1.6 gallon size) and passive tank under vehicle below the driver with 5.4 ballon non-heated tank. And yes, it had obviously DPF. Never had an issue in winter. Actually that was by far best winter vehicle. It had PTC heater and would start heating interior like crazy after 5 seconds from starting vehicle.
 
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I was not asking if it had a DPF (Diesel Particulate Filter) but whether it uses the DEF fluid (Diesel Exhaust Fluid) and uses regeneration cycles like a larger diesel. So while they are similar in that they both regenerate the use of DEF with the DPF was part of the problem they were having. The DEF was gelling in the cold temps and causing regen problems. I understand you use DEF also--I was not aware that SCR means that. Most experienced diesel mechanics will tell you that the tier 4 diesels are much more prone to failure--whether in farm equipment, OTR trucks, or small diesels. That is simply the statistics of the industry--not to mention how detrimental tier 4 is to engine longevity. Adding cold weather to the equation only increases the chance of failure. Your good experience with a BMW does not discount the fact that tier 4 diesel systems are far more prone to failure. However I don't doubt that BMW likely has a superior execution of a Tier 4 system than what is in the GMC Canyon and I don't doubt the reliability of your reporting. Day after day of driving in those temps will find any weakness in a tier 4 system, while an older diesel without those systems will just chug right along with the proper fuel.
 
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Originally Posted by T-Stick
I was not asking if it had a DPF (Diesel Particulate Filter) but whether it uses the DEF fluid (Diesel Exhaust Fluid) and uses regeneration cycles like a larger diesel. So while they are similar in that they both regenerate the use of DEF with the DPF was part of the problem they were having. The DEF was gelling in the cold temps and causing regen problems. I understand you use DEF also--I was not aware that SCR means that. Most experienced diesel mechanics will tell you that the tier 4 diesels are much more prone to failure--whether in farm equipment, OTR trucks, or small diesels. That is simply the statistics of the industry--not to mention how detrimental tier 4 is to engine longevity. Adding cold weather to the equation only increases the chance of failure. Your good experience with a BMW does not discount the fact that tier 4 diesel systems are far more prone to failure. However I don't doubt that BMW likely has a superior execution of a Tier 4 system than what is in the GMC Canyon and I don't doubt the reliability of your reporting. Day after day of driving in those temps will find any weakness in a tier 4 system, while an older diesel without those systems will just chug right along with the proper fuel.
SCR-Selective Catalytic Reduction. Anything after 2009 in the US in passenger diesels has to have SCR to be compliant with EPA and CARB requirements. However, you are right, SCR system, especially first generation that I had on BMW are prone to failures. BMW was actually very reliable except SCR system (take that out I only had to deal with open thermostat). While BMW did not have these "rookie" mistakes, system itself is overly complicated for every day use, on top of that due to BMW chasing weight distribution, it had two tanks which added to complexity since DEF had to be transferred from passive (larger non-heated to smaller, heated tank). Keeping this part in best shape required some interest in system, as solution was to always fill passive tank, never active tank and with that keep system constantly working. That added additional plumbing on top of already complicated plumbing. The heat unit in active tank was prone to failure which BMW only replaced as tank assembly ($2,400. Luckily mine failed during warranty period). However, heat unite could be purchased for VW Touareg and Audi Q7 TDI and some other vehicles as it is same, and it was like $206 and some 3hrs of work. Passive tank had level sensor issue, but nothing that $5 resistor could not resolve it. The biggest problem was diagnosis once SCR sensors go bad. Is it pre CAT or post-CAT sensor? Is it DEF injector or SCR mixer (CAT). The second generation BMW utilized on X5 F15 and 328d F30 was much more robust, but with all these moving parts it is really not worth it. However, all this would not leave you on the road. Active, heated tank was in engine compartment very close to exhaust manifold. On other hand I had BMW E61 525d in Europe that just had DPF, not SCR, and made 485k km, was starting as low as -42c, and never had any failure except two thermostats and one EGR.
 
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The issue with the OP truck seems to be GM related, minus the fuel gel. Cold weather testing should have unmasked these issues that they experienced. I have a friend (retired) who was a testing engineer for Ford for many years. I've heard many cold & warm weather testing scenarios that they would put models through, almost unbelievable but true. I have/had multiple newer Diesel engine equipped trucks, and have experienced -40f, the problems that the OP experienced are completely unacceptable on a newer vehicle.
 
Originally Posted by roadrunner1
The issue with the OP truck seems to be GM related, minus the fuel gel. Cold weather testing should have unmasked these issues that they experienced. I have a friend (retired) who was a testing engineer for Ford for many years. I've heard many cold & warm weather testing scenarios that they would put models through, almost unbelievable but true. I have/had multiple newer Diesel engine equipped trucks, and have experienced -40f, the problems that the OP experienced are completely unacceptable on a newer vehicle.
I do not think that this vehicle has heated filter, which is either some serious cost cutting or just plain negligence.
 
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