3.5 in the new Chrysler 300 gets 10w30

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The 3.5 HO in my 300M is spec'd for 10w30, and it seems Chrysler is keeping that same spec for this engine in the new LX platform (Chrysler 300 and Dodge Magnum). Here is a photo of the engine I took today in a 300 Touring. The oil cap has "10w30" on it. The oil cap on my 300M doesn't specifiy a grade, it just has the API starburst symbol on it.  - There was also a 1961 300G on the floor for tonight's premier of the new 300. How's this for an engine?  -
 
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413 max wedge w/ cross-ram? Does your 300M call for 10w-30 just above a certain temp, or year round. I know with my 97 LHS 3.5, in the winter, 5w-20 pennzoil makes it "pump up" the quickest. Then I switch to 10w-30 as soon as possible. I'll try Mobil 1 0w-30 next winter. Steve [ April 23, 2004, 02:10 AM: Message edited by: 69 Riv GS ]
 
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This seems a little strange to me that they would require 10W-30 motor oil in the new 2005 Chrysler 300. As we here at bobistheoilguy know the new ILSAC GF-4/API SM oil should become available this summer. Chrysler must think that it is critical to have a shear stable oil in that engine and that an ILSAC GF-4/API SM 5W-30 motor oil will not provide this. [I dont know] Ford still requires 5W-30 oil in the 2.0L SVT Focus and the 4.0L V6 Explorer and Ranger. They have been using 5W-20 in nearly everything else since the 2001 model year. Some Chrylser vehicles will be using ILSAC GF-4/API SM 5W-20 motor oil for the 2005 model year. I wonder how many of the 3.5L V6 equiped Chrysler 300's will get 5W-20 put in by mistake and how many other Chrysler products that require 5W-20 or 5W-30 will get 10W-30 instead. One Chrysler dealer that I took my 1999 Plymouth Breeze in to have the engine rebuilt at about 20,000 miles would put 15W-40 in every vehicle. The engine was rebuilt again under the Chrysler extended warranty at about 75,000 miles. [Mad] Thankfully I don't own that car anymore. [Happy] [ April 23, 2004, 05:56 AM: Message edited by: Sin City ]
 

G-MAN

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quote:
Originally posted by quadrun1: The 1961 engine is prettier! Hey G-Man II, weren't you gonna try a 5W-20 in your Chrysler?
Yes, I've got Pennzoil 5w20 in there now. It has about 1100 miles on it. Expect a 3000 mile UOA toward the end of summer.
 
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Looks like the drivers side won't seem too bad. Kind of resembles the Fords' coil on plug ignition system. Now the passenger side, ouch...be doing a lot of removal just to get at it. You think that's bad, try changing plugs out on a 01 F150 with the 5.4l engine.
 

G-MAN

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quote:
Originally posted by joatmon: G-Man, Wow! Which dealer? I may have visit and give my eyeballs a treat.
Benson Chrysler on Hwy 29 in Greer. The 61 300G belongs to Mr. Benson.
 
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My understanding is that DC has reduced the maximum drain interval from 7500 miles to 6000 miles on many of their newer engines, based on internal testing. They will maintain these intervals for the GF-4/SM rated oils. In other words, they feel their engine lube requirements are increasing at a faster rate than improvements in oil quality....I expect most of these Hemi engines will be used pretty hard, hence the SAE 10w-30 recommendation. Thermoplastic intake manifolds have been used for a number of years, in fact BMW uses them on their very expensive engines. This material is light, dimensionally stable and easy to mold in complex shapes. It is also possible to get much smoother internal surface contours than with a typical metal casting. The internal surfaces of cast metal intake manifolds are actually quite rough - hence the popularity of "extrude honing" with an abrasive clay slurry. TP's also have much lower thermal conductivity than metals, so you aren't heating up the manifold and the incoming air as much. A denser intake charge increases power [Smile]
 

G-MAN

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quote:
Originally posted by TooSlick: I expect most of these Hemi engines will be used pretty hard, hence the SAE 10w-30 recommendation.
Yes, but as I posted the other day, according to allpar.com, the Hemi in the 300C will come with 5w20. The 3.5 V6 pictured here in the 300 Toruing is essentially the same engine that came in my 300M and like my 3.5 is spec'd for 10w30. I'm very anxious to see how the Pennzoil 5w20 is doing in my engine. I should have a 3000 mile UOA by the end of the summer.
 

Patman

Staff member
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quote:
Originally posted by Schmoe: Seems like all manufacturers are going with plastic intakes. Boy I hate that, but what can you do?
I love it actually! Believe it or not they are very durable too, you never hear of problems with them. The LS1 and LS6 engines use them, and so does the Mustang 4.6. The big benefit is that these composite intakes do not heat soak very easily, so for someone like me who drag races, they are better because you can run back to back and not lose horsepower. Unfortunately, the LT1 Firebird I have uses an aluminum intake, which heats up big time, so in order for me to run my best ET, I need to let the intake cool down for quite a while. [Frown] But when I had my LS1 Firebird, it was great, I once ran 30 runs at the dragstrip back to back, only shutting off the engine once for 5min, and the car ran quicker towards the ends of the runs! [ April 23, 2004, 08:16 PM: Message edited by: Patman ]
 

vvk

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Philadelphia
quote:
Originally posted by Schmoe: Seems like all manufacturers are going with plastic intakes. Boy I hate that, but what can you do?
Can you say "disposable?" How do you change the plugs in that thing? It's disgusting! [Mad]
 
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